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Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater MA

The Keith family of the region of country in and about the Bridgewaters, members of which have been most prominent and influential there from the beginning, is as ancient as are the settlements there. Bridgewater, as originally, was the first interior settlement in the Old Colony, the grant of the plantation being made in 1645, but the actual settlement was not commenced until after 1650, the first lots being taken up in the West Parish, and there the first house was built and the first improvements made, the proprietors and inhabitants practically all coming from Duxbury. From the ancient town of Bridgewater have since been set off the towns of East Bridgewater, West Bridgewater and North Bridgewater, the latter since becoming the thriving city of Brockton. The first settlements being made in the West Parish, the first church was built there. While the settlement was thus early made and the church formed, the society had no regular settled pastor until the coming thither, in 1661, of Rev. James Keith, who was born in Scotland, and emigrated to this country at the age of eighteen years. From the Rev. James Keith have descended practically all those bearing the name in this Commonwealth. Across the sea the Keiths were among the most ancient families in Europe. Of the nobility of Scotland, while some were originally Scots, others at different times came thither from foreign countries. To the latter class belonged the Keiths, it being the supposition that the ancient family derived its origin from one Robert (who was of German origin), a chieftain among the Catti, from which it is said...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

An Historical Sketch of the Seneca County Medical Society

At the anniversary meeting of the Seneca County Medical Society held at Waterloo, July 23, 1885, a resolution was introduced by Dr. S. R. Welles, and adopted by the Society, that a committee be appointed which should prepare biographical sketches of members of the Society from its earliest history to the present time. As a result, this manuscript was published which includes 75 biographies of the early pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society.

An Account of the Sufferings of Mercy Harbison – Indian Captivities

On the 4th of November, 1791, a force of Americans under General Arthur St. Clair was attacked, near the present Ohio-Indiana boundary line, by about the same number of Indians led by Blue Jacket, Little Turtle, and the white renegade Simon Girty. Their defeat was the most disastrous that ever has been suffered by our arms when engaged against a savage foe on anything like even terms. Out of 86 officers and about 1400 regular and militia soldiers, St. Clair lost 70 officers killed or wounded, and 845 men killed, wounded, or missing. The survivors fled in panic, throwing away their weapons and accoutrements. Such was “St. Clair’s defeat.”

The utter incompetency of the officers commanding this expedition may be judged from the single fact that a great number of women were allowed to accompany the troops into a wilderness known to be infested with the worst kind of savages. There were about 250 of these women with the “army” on the day of the battle. Of these, 56 were killed on the spot, many being pinned to the earth by stakes driven through their bodies. Few of the others escaped captivity.

After this unprecedented victory, the Indians became more troublesome than ever along the frontier. No settler’s home was safe, and many were destroyed in the year of terror that followed. The awful fate of one of those households is told in the following touching narrative of Mercy Harbison, wife of one of the survivors of St. Clair’s defeat. How two of her little children were slaughtered before her eyes, how she was dragged through the wilderness with a babe at her breast, how cruelly maltreated, and how she finally escaped, barefooted and carrying her infant through days and nights of almost superhuman exertion, she has left record in a deposition before the magistrates at Pittsburgh and in the statement here reprinted.

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biography of Joseph Wilkins

Joseph Wilkins, a resident of Pembroke and a veteran of the Civil War, was born May 24, 1844, son of Jeremiah Hall and Mary (Thompson) Wilkins. He is not only a representative of an old New Hampshire family, but a lineal descendant of ancestors who were first settlers in this country. Bray Wilkins, who came from Wales, Brecknock County, was a descendant of Lord John Wilkins, who belonged to a family that traced their lineage back to 1090 and had borne many honorable titles. Lord John was a connection of the Bishop Wilkins who married the sister of the Protector, Oliver Cromwell. Bray, at the age of twenty, is supposed to have come to this country in the same ship with Endicott, about 1630, and to have first settled in Dorchester, Mass. Before 1659 he bought from Governor Richard Bellingham seven hundred acres of land called Wills Hill, which in 1661 was within Salem’s six-mile limit. He died in 1702, a patriarchal land owner, amidst the farms and homes of his sons and daughters. The portion of Bray’s son, John Wilkins, was situated in Danvers, Mass. John, son of John, who was born about 1689, went with his wife, Mary Goodale Wilkins, and two sons to Marlboro, Mass., in 1740. His eldest son, Josiah Wilkins, married Lois Bush, whose grandparents settled in Marlboro in 1690. Of Josiah’s five sons, the third, Jonathan, born in 1755, graduated at Harvard College, studied theology, and was called to preach at the old South Parish, Concord, N.H., in 1789. He married Sarah Hall, whose grandfather, Deacon Joseph Hall, was one of Concord’s first...

Biography of Gustavus Charles Wilkins

Forty-two years ago Gustavus Charles Wilkens, a native of the fair land of Poland, left the dominion of the Czar to seek his fortune in America, and being favorably impressed with the possibilities open to him in this country he lost no time in renouncing his allegiance to the Russian government. Mr. Wilkens belongs to a race of liberty-loving people who have long cherished an ardent desire to regain their national independence, but the iron hand of imperial Russia still holds them in subjection. His father, Ludwig Wilkens, born in 1801, was in the service of the Russian government, having been at the mint for some time, and subsequently had full charge of large pulp and paper mills in Warsaw, Sacifa and Bozizno. In addition to his business ability he possessed a varied knowledge of the world and its affairs in general, having circumnavigated the globe, but his career of progress was cut short by his untimely death, which occurred when he was forty-seven years old. Ludwig Wilkens was married in 1842 to Caroline Teichman, who was born in Modzerowo, Poland, March 4, 1820, and is still living. Her father was the owner of three large freight boats plying on the Vistula river, which were destroyed by the Russian government forces during the Polish rebellion of 1830. Caroline (Teichman) Welkins’ mother was before marriage, Minnie Anglehart, born in Vloclawek, Russia, in 1978, daughter of a Polish shipbuilder at Vloclawek on the river Vistula, who died in Modzerowo at the advanced age of ninety-seven years. The children of Ludwig and Caroline (Teichman) Wilkens are: 1. Gustavus Charles, see forward. 2....

Biographical Sketch of J. Reuben B. Wilkins

Wilkins, J. Reuben B., Ferrisburgh, Vergennes p. o., was born in Vergennes, Vt., September 18, 1834. He is a general farmer, town superintendent of schools, and a graduate of the University of Vermont in the class of 1855. In 1856 he read law with W. W. Peck, esq., in Burlington, Vt., and was admitted to the bar at Albany, N. Y., in 1857. He was married in 1859 to Harriet E. Guinnip, daughter of Matthias B. and Margaret (Pinney) Guinnip, residents of Watkins, Schuyler county, N. Y. Three children were born to them in Ferrisburgh, Vt. — Anna M., Daniel N., and Alice B. J. Reuben B. was a son of Samuel A. and Ann Smith (Nichols) Wilkins. She was born in Newtown, Conn., in 1800, and he was born in Cornish, N. H., in 1795. They were married at Vergennes, Vt., in 1820. They had a family of two children born to them — Mary Ann (who died in the Ursuline Convent, at Three Rivers, Canada, in 1846) and J. Reuben B., who lives on the farm in Ferrisburgh, Vt., which was set to him by the will of Daniel Nichols, his grandfather. Ann Smith Nichols was daughter of Daniel and Mary Ann (Booth) Nichols; she died in Ferrisburgh, Vt., in 1845. Samuel A. Wilkins died in Washington, D. C., in 1873, and was buried in Salem, N....

Biography of Jonathan Wilkins

Jonathan Wilkins, one of the earliest inhabitants of Athens, was a man of very considerable learning, and for some time taught a pioneer school. Of his son, Timothy Wilkins, the following reminiscence is furnished by Dr. C. F. Perkins; it is hardly less strange than the history immortalized by Tennyson in 11 Enoch Arden.” Mr. Wilkins was skillful and enterprising in business, but, through no fault of his own, became embarrassed, was hard pressed by creditors, and pursued by writs. In those days, when a man could be imprisoned for a debt of ten dollars, to fail in business was an awful thing. Wilkins was not dishonest, but had a heart to pay if he could. He battled bravely with his misfortunes for a considerable period, but with poor success. One day in the year 1829, full of despair, he came from his home west of town, across the Hockhocking, and having transacted some business with the county clerk, went out, and was supposed to have returned home. The next morning it became known that he was not at his house. Inquiry and search being made, the boat in which he usually crossed the river was seen floating bottom upward, and his hat was also found swimming down the stream. Mr. Wilkins was a popular man in the community; news of his loss soon spread, the people gathered from every quarter and measures were taken to recover the body. The river was dragged, a cannon was fired over the water, and other means resorted to, but to no purpose; the body was not found. The excellent Mrs. Wilkins put...

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