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Cotton County Oklahoma Cemeteries

Most of these Cotton County Oklahoma cemeteries are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Cotton County OKGenWeb Archives Devol Cemetery Elm Grove Cemetery Fairview Cemetery, Randlett Fairview Cemetery 2 Temple Cemetery Abell-Gutierrez Surnames Hackett-Oxford Surnames Pack-Zerkle Surnames Partial Extract Walters Cemetery Wilkerson Cemetery Hosted at Cotton County OKGenWeb Devol Cemetery Elm Grove Cemetery Fairview Cemetery Temple Masonic Cemetery Walters Cemetery Wilkerson Cemetery Hosted at Oklahoma Cemeteries Fairview Cemetery, aka Randlett Cemetery Wilkerson Cemetery Search: Oklahoma, Find A Grave Index Search: Billion Graves for Cemeteries in Cotton County...

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they were occasionally forced to give food and shelter to both, which aroused the jealousy of both the Indian allies of the English and the American frontiersmen, although they preserved the strictest neutrality. In February 1772, the American settlers (nothing more could be expected) assumed to believe that the Moravian, or Christian Indians; as they were called, harbored the hostile Indians; therefore they pronounced them enemies, and at once doomed them to destruction. Accordingly on the following march, ninety volunteers, under the leadership of one David Williamson, started for Gnadenbrutten where they arrived on the morning of the 8th, and at once surrounded and entered the station; but found the most of the Indians in a field gathering corn. They told them they had come in peace and friendship, and with a proposition to move them from their unpleasant and dangerous position between the two hostile races to Fort Pitt for their better protection. The unsuspecting Indians, delighted at the suggestion of their removal to a safer place, gave up their few...

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Genealogy of the Cherokee Wilkerson Family

Instructions on how to interpret this information 11 Coo-ta-ya. Edward Wilkerson and John Wilkerson 1112 Eliza Wilkerson. Jesse Bushyhead ________ 2 Aaron Wilkerson 3 Richard Wilkerson* 4 James Wilkerson* 5 George Wilkerson.  Susan Poorbear 6 John Wilkerson. Annie Woods 151 John Wilkerson. Rebecca Oglesby 2 Riley Wilkerson* 3 James Monroe Wilkerson. Nancy Jane Keys 4 George Wilkerson 5 Laura Wells Wilkerson  Wilson Sanders 6 Eliza Wilkerson   John Ross 7 Leonard Worcester Wilkerson. Ellen Bible 8 Mary Wilkerson. John Henry Coody 116218 Martha Wilkerson*  John Groom 2 Nannie Wilkerson*  Solomon Ray 3 Mary Wilkerson. Charles Jones 4  Elizabeth Wilkerson. Mack Messer 5 John Wilkerson. Jennie Campbell 6 Ace Wilkerson. Margaret Jones 7 Caroline Wilkerson*  Joseph Wickett 8 Whidby Wilkerson. Elnora Winpiegler nee...

Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman and girl had a special servant for her own use and care and each white man had his colored man or valet. There are no records of a big slave trade in this county. When a slave was sold it was usually to a friend or neighbor and most masters were very considerate and would not sell unless a family could go together. For instance from the diary of Mrs. Wliza[TR: Eliza?] Magowan 1853-1871, we read this: “Lina and two children Scott and Dulcina sold to J. Wilkerson.” Also another item: “Violet married to Dennie” showing that care was taken that marriages were made among the negroes. The darkies had suppers in their own quarters and had much merrymaking and laughter. Illness among the darkies were cared from among themselves but under the watchful eye of the master and mistress. The darkies were deeply religious and learned much of the Bible from devout mistresses who felt it their holy duty to teach these ignorant people the word of God....

Slave Narrative of Bert Luster

Person Interviewed: Bert Luster Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Watson County, Tennessee Date of Birth: 1853 Age: 85 I’ll be jest frank, I’m not for sho’ when I was born, but it was in 1853. Don’t know the month, but I was sho’ born in 1853 in Watson County, Tennessee. You see my father was owned by Master Luster and my mother was owned by Masters Joe and Bill Asterns (father and son). I can remember when Master Astern moved from Watson County, Tennessee he brought me and my mother with him to Barnum County Seat, Texas. Master Astern owned about twelve slaves, and dey was all Astern ‘cept Miriah Blmore’s son Jim. He owned ’bout five or six hundred acres of ground, and de slaves raised and shucked all de corn and picked all de cotton. De whites folks lived in a big double log house and we slaves lived in log cabins. Our white folks fed us darkies! We ate nearly ever’thing dey ate. Dey ate turkey, chickens, ducks, geese, fish and we killed beef. pork, rabbits and deer. Yes, and possums too. And whenever we killed beef we tanned the hide and dare was a white man who made shoes for de white folks and us darkies. I tell you I’m not gonna lie, den white folks was good to us darkies. We didn’t have no rean overseer. Master Astern and his son jest told us niggers what to do and we did it, but 50 miles away den niggers had a mean overseer, and dey called him “poor white trash”. “old whooser”, and...

Slave Narrative of Charlotte Martin

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Charlotte Martin Location: Live Oak, Florida Occupation: Farmed, made quilts, and made herb cures. Charlotte Mitchell Martin, one of twenty children born to Shepherd and Lucinda Mitchell, eighty-two years ago, was a slave of Judge Wilkerson on a large plantation in Sixteen, Florida, a little town near Madison. Shepherd Mitchell was a wagoner who hauled whiskey from Newport News, Virginia for his owner. Wilkerson was very cruel and held them in constant fear of him. He would not permit them to hold religious meetings or any other kinds of meetings, but they frequently met in secret to conduct religious services. When they were caught, the “instigators” – known or suspected – were severely flogged. Charlotte recalls how her oldest brother was whipped to death for taking part in one of the religious ceremonies. This cruel act halted the secret religious services. Wilkerson found it very profitable to raise and sell slaves. He selected the strongest and best male and female slaves and mated them exclusively for breeding. The huskiest babies were given the best of attention in order that they might grow into sturdy youths, for it was those who brought the highest prices at the slave markets. Sometimes the master himself had sexual relations with his female slaves, for the products of miscegenation were very remunerative. These offsprings were in demand as house servants. After slavery the Mitchells began to separate. A few of the children remained with their parents and eked out their living from the soil. During this period Charlotte began to attract attention with her herb cures. Doctors sought her...

Biography of Robert A. Wilkerson

Since 1915 Robert A. Wilkerson has resided in Pryor and he is recognized as one of the prominent and representative members of the Oklahoma bar. He was born near Carthage, Smith county, Tennessee, on the 30th of January, 1884, a son of James A. and Elizabeth (Hale) Wilkerson, both natives of Tennessee and still living. The father is actively engaged in farming and has won substantial success in that connection. Five sons and four daughters have been born to their union, of whom Robert A. is the youngest. On reaching school age Robert A. Wilkerson attended the public schools of Smith county and later entered Grant University at Chattanooga, Tennessee. He studied law there for some time and then enrolled in Cumberland University, where he was graduated, in 1915 with the LL. R. degree. He at once established offices in Pryor and has since practiced here. From the beginning he has been unusually prosperous and the success be has attained is due to his own efforts and merits. He has built up an extensive and lucrative patronage and handles much important litigation before the courts. In Kansas City, Missouri, in July, 1917, occurred the marriage of Mr. Wilkerson to Miss Norma Neff, a daughter of J. W. Neff. The Neffs are an old and representative family of this state, who located at Checotah at an early day. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilkerson: Luke Alton and Neva Marie. The political allegiance of Mr. Wilkerson is given to the Democratic Party, he having firm belief in the principles of that party as factors in good government....

Biography of Oliver C. Wilkerson

Oliver C. Wilkerson is one of the enterprising and progressive young business men of Washington County, his home being about three miles north of Dewey, where he resides with his parents. He was born at Claremore, Oklahoma, on the 5th of March, 1899, and is a son of Richard Wilkerson and a grandson of Thomas Wilkerson. The family are full-blooded Cherokees. Richard Wilkerson was born August 26, 1866, in the Choctaw Nation, his parents being Thomas and Lizzy (Tenewey) Wilkerson, both of whom were full-blooded Cherokees and were natives of Georgia. In childhood they were brought by the United States government to the Indian Territory and after the outbreak of the Civil war Thomas Wilkerson, who was a minister of the Baptist Church, went to the south, leaving his family in the Choctaw Nation,whence he returned after serving with the Confederate army until the close of the Civil war. He died when his son, Richard, the only child of his last marriage, was about six months old. Mrs. Wilkerson passed away in 1885, at her home four miles west of Porum. By a previous marriage she was the mother of two children, Eli and Ella, who are both deceased and Thomas Wilkerson had a son by a former marriage. Richard Wilkerson was reared in the Canadian district of the Cherokee Nation and in his youth became a student in the Male Seminary at Tahlequah, which was conducted as a national school by the Cherokee Nation. He could not speak English when he entered that institution but was well versed in the English tongue when he concluded a three years’...

C. C. Wilkerson

Sergt. 1st Class, Med. Corps, 81st Div., 312th F. A.; of Durham County; son of W. A. and Mrs. Mary P. Wilkerson. Entered service Oct. 5, 1917, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camps Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Returned to USA June 13, 1919, at Newport News, Va. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 21,...
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