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Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery Graham Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery, Graham, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the DAR cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Arbuckle, J. N., 07 Aug 1837 – 10 Dec 1882 Boyd, Robert H., 09 May 1830 – 22 June 1917, Co. B. 10th Iowa Regiment Cain, John, 23 Aug 1868 – 15 Apr 1892 Cain, Melissa J., w/o John Cain, 12 Mar 1813 – 07 Aug 1867 Cain, Martha, w/o John Cain, 20 Jun 1838 – 17 Jan 1893 Cain, Emma, 1867 – 1927 Cain, Marcellus, 22 Sep 1842 – 25 Mar 1878 Chambers, Rose N., d/o of Chas & Nancy Chambers, 25 Sep 1864 – 08 Jun 1886 Chambers, Nancy, 25 Jun 1819 – 24 Jan 1891 Chambers, James B., 07 May 1822 – 24 Dec 1893 Chambers, Melita, w/o Alex Chambers, d. 04 Feb 1878, age 47 years Chambers, Avery, consort of Rhoda Chambers, d. 08 Mar 1865, age 67 years Chambers, Rhoda, w/o Avery Chambers, d. 21 Aug 1875, age 75 years Chasteen, inf. Son of Chasteen, 1863 Chasteen, James, 07 Aug 1818 – 07 Jun 1889 Chasteen, Elizabeth, 1820 – 1902 Chasteen, Ephraim, 25 Nov 1847 – 01 Sep 1927 Chasteen, Christenia, w/o E. Chasteen, 28 Mar...

History of the Methodist Church at Norwich Vermont

Prior to the year 1800, Methodism had scarcely gained a foothold in Vermont. The first Methodist society in the State is said to have been formed at Vershire by Nicholas Suethen in 1796. Two years later, only one hundred church members were returned as residents in the Vershire Circuit, then including the whole of eastern Vermont. Zadock Thompson, in the first edition of his Gazetteer of Vermont, published in 1824, gives the number of preachers, traveling and local, at that time as about one hundred, and the number of societies much greater. Probably no religious body ever made so rapid a growth in the state or the country as did the Methodists during the first twenty-five years of the nineteenth century. Although largely outnumbering every other at the present time, its later rate of increase is comparatively slow. We have no information that fixes the time at which Methodist meetings began to be held in Norwich. The earliest preaching was by circuit preachers, and of these Eleazer Wells and Nathaniel Stearns were among the first. Both of these men had the certificates of their ordination to the ministry (as early as 1810 or 1811) by Bishop McKendree entered upon the town records, and both doubtless labored here more or less about that time. Rev. Amasa Taylor was also here some part of the time about 1813. About 1815, the first church building was erected by the Methodists, a wooden structure of modest dimensions, which stood near the forks of the highway leading from Union Village to Norwich Plain, and about two miles south of the former place. Some members...

The Founding of Norwich Vermont

As we have already seen, Norwich virtually had its origin in the colony of Connecticut in the year 1761. On the 26th day of August of that year, at the house of William Waterman, inn-holder, in the town of Mansfield, in said colony, were convened the proprietors or grantees of a newly granted township of land situated 150 miles away to the northward, in a wilderness country then just beginning to be known as the “New Hampshire Grants.” These men were assembled to decide upon the first steps to be taken to open up to settlement and improvement a tract of forest six miles square located on the west bank of Connecticut River forty miles north of Charlestown, New Hampshire (Fort Number Four), then the farthest outpost of civilization in the upper valley of that river. At the time of which we are speaking all that portion of the present state of New Hampshire lying west of the intervals of the Merrimac in the vicinity of Concord was entirely uninhabited, and lay in the primitive wildness of nature. A few townships along that river above Concord had been surveyed and located, and thither a few resolute pioneers had already penetrated, among them Captain Ebenezar Webster, the father of the future expounder of the Constitution, whose cabin was at one time, it is said, nearer the north star than that of any other New Englander. But beyond a narrow fringe of settlements along the Merrimac, the whole of western New Hampshire north of Keene was alike covered by primitive forests and untouched by the hand of man1. To the westward...

Old Norfolk County Massachusetts Records

May 17, 1654, Jno Ward of Haverhill and wife Alice conveyed to Elizabeth Lilford of Haverhill (wife of Tho: Lilford) 4-acre house lot. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Rich: Ormsby. Ack. before Tho: Wiggin May 15, 1658. April 22, 1659, Robert Swan of Haverhill and wife Elizabeth, for £r6, conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 6 acres of houselot I bought of Mathias Button, bounded by Theophilus Satchwell, etc. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Symon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. Oct. 12, 1661, Obadiah Eyer (his mark) of Haverhill and wife Hannah, for £5 l0s., conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 4 acres in flaggy meadow, bounded by Edward Clarke and Jno Eyer. Wit Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Simon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. April 21, 1659, William Simons (also Simmons) (his M mark) of Haverhill and wife Elizabeth, for £8 10s., conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 3 acres of houselot I bought of Theophilus Satchwell, bounded by Daniel Ladd, etc. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Simon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. April 19, 1661, James Davis, sr., (his mark) and wife Cisley (her mark) of Haverhill, for £10, conveyed to George Brown of Haverhill 2 acres of my houselot on the side next grantee’s houselot. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Symon Bradstreet Oct. 17, 1661. Thomas Barnet (signed Barnerd; also spelled Barnard) of Salisbury, husbandman, conveyed to Richard Currier of Salisbury, planter, 24 acres of upland in Salisbury new town, bounded by John Eyer, sr., now in possession of grantee, widow Willix (formerly wife of Tho: Hauxworth) and Merrimack...

Biography of Newell H. Webster

Newell H. Webster, now a prominent and affluent resident of Helena, Mont., was born November 29, 1836, in Henniker, a son of Jesse and Susan C. (Newell) Webster. An account of his Newell was known as a remarkably bright lad, showing even then the vigor of intellect and strength of character inherited from his mother. After leaving school he learned the tailor’s trade from his father, subsequently spending two years as a clerk in Boston. His health failing, a change of climate was advised; and, little thinking what the future years had in store for him, he bade farewell to his friends, and started westward, arriving in Minnesota early in 1861. At Hastings he joined a party engaged in surveying for a railway, being employed as chain carrier. His investigating turn of mind and natural desire for knowledge caused him to note the transit’s record in a book of his own. Soon after he became expert in the use of the instruments, whereupon the engineer in charge placed him in charge of the transit. When the surveying in that State was completed, he received and accepted a flattering offer of an engagement in the same line of business in Colorado, where he went in 1863. He was subsequently selected to lead an exploring party into Idaho and Montana; and he was at East Bannack, Montana Territory, when the settlement of the district was beginning. Deciding at once to locate in the new and undeveloped region, Mr. Webster identified himself with its interests. Eventually he established himself in business in the future city of Helena, where he erected the first...

Biography of Stuart Webster

Stuart Webster, vice president, general manager and treasurer of the Racine Rubber Company, was born in New York in 1870 and after pursuing his preliminary education in private schools entered the preparatory school at Andover, Massachusetts. Still later he matriculated in Yale University, where he won the Bachelor of Arts degree upon his graduation with the class of 1892. He then went abroad for further study and is a graduate of the medical department of the University of Vienna. He never gave his attention to the practice of the profession, however, but with his return to America entered commercial circles. His business career has been one of continuous advancement and throughout the entire period he has been identified with the middle west, having accompanied his parents on their removal to Chicago when he was a youth of fourteen years. He was with the Diamond Match Company for four years, connected with its various departments, and in 1900 he embarked in the importing business in Chicago, there remaining until 1910, when he came to Racine and entered into association with C. F. U. Kelley, Frank L. Mitchell and J. H. Dwight in organizing and promoting the Racine Rubber Company. The history of the business and its development is given above, the record indicating the marvelous growth of the enterprise, which within a short space of six years has built up a business that necessitates the employment of between eight hundred and one thousand men. Throughout the entire period Mr. Webster has been watchful of every indication pointing to success, has utilized forces to the best possible advantage and has shown...

Biography of William F. Webster

The social, political and business history of this section is filled with the deeds and doings of self-made men, and no man in Stone County, Missouri, is more deserving the appellation than Mr. W. F. Webster, for he marked out his own career in youth and has steadily followed it up to the present, his prosperity being attributable to his earnest and persistent endeavor, and to the fact that he has already consistently tried to follow the teachings of the “Golden Rule.” He is a native Missourian, born in Ralls County, June 18, 1828, The eldest but one of four children born to the marriage of Elizure D. and Jane (Fourman) Webster. The grandfather, Daniel Webster, who was related to the famous Daniel Webster, was a native of the Old Bay State, and he was with Jackson at the battle of New Orleans. He and wife died in Massachusetts, within twelve miles of Boston, where the family was a noted one. The father of our subject was born in Massachusetts in 1799, and when eighteen years of age, or in 1817, he turned his face west-ward and settled in Ralls County, Missouri, where he soon became the owner of a farm. He learned the blacksmith’s trade, was handy with tools, and could work at the millwright’s trade as well as at all kinds of wood work. Mr. Webster was married in Ralls County to Miss Jane Fourman, and later settled in Monroe County, Missouri,where, in connection with farming, he followed black smithing, and ran a water mill on Salt River. There he resided until 1845, when he moved to...

Biography of George Washington Webster

GEORGE WASHINGTON WEBSTER. As a progressive tiller of the soil the subject of this sketch has no superior throughout Ozark County, Missouri, for he is industrious, decidedly progressive in his views, and has always taken advantage of all new methods for the improvement of his land. His fine and valuable estate is located ten miles west of Gainesville on Bratton Spring Creek, and comprises 480 acres, in two different tracts, all of which has been acquired through his own efforts. He is also quite extensively engaged in the raising of stock; in fact, is well up in all branches of agriculture and is well worthy of bearing the title of “self-made man.” At the time he settled on his farm there were about twelve or fifteen acres cleared, but all this has been changed and his farm is now a remarkably well-improved one. He was born in Martin County, Indiana, in 1834, a son of Jonathan and Catherine (Graham) Webster, natives of New Hampshire and Kentucky, respectively, the birth of the former occurring in 1804 and that of the latter in 1806. In 1854 they removed from Indiana to Douglas County, Missouri, having spent the previous winter in Illinois. After one year in Douglas County, Missouri. they removed to Ozark County, near the Arkansas line and there resided until the Civil War, when they removed to Illinois. At the end of about two years they returned to Douglas County and after the war to Ozark County, where Mr. Webster died in September, 1892, his wife, having been called from life in Douglas County about 1886, at the home of...

Biographical Sketch of John Howard Webster

Webster, John Howard; assignee The Variety Iron Works Co.; born, Portsmouth, N. H., Nov. 8, 1846; came to CIeveland in 1850; public school education, graduated from Yale in 1868; degree A. B., Union Law College, 1870; degree LL. B.; received degree of A. M. from Yale in 1871; engaged in the practice of law in Cleverland until 1891, when he was appointed assignee for the Variety Iron Works Co.; still serving; pres. Chamberlain Cartridge & Target Co., Buckeye Milling Co.; vice pres. Penton Publishing Co.; interested in other corporations; member Union, University, Rowfant Clubs, Cleveland, and University Club, New Haven, Conn.; member Japan Society, London,...

More Victims of Anti-Slavery Act – Fugitive Slave Law

Columbia, Penn., (end of March, 1852;) a colored man, named William Smith, was arrested as a fugitive slave in the lumber yard of Mr. Gottlieb, by Deputy Marshal Snyder, of Harrisburg, and police officer Ridgeley, of Baltimore, under a warrant from Commissioner McAllister. Smith endeavored to escape, when Ridgeley drew a pistol and shot him dead! Ridgeley was demanded by the Governor of Pennsylvania, of the Governor of Maryland, and the demand was referred to the Maryland Legislature. Hon. J.R. Giddings proposed the erection of a monument to Smith. James Phillips, who had resided in Harrisburg, Penn., for fourteen years, was arrested May 24, 1852, as the former slave of Dennis Hudson, of Culpepper County, Virginia, afterwards bought by Henry T. Fant, of Fauquier County. He was brought before United States Commissioner McAllister. Judge McKinney volunteered his services to defend the alleged fugitive. The Commissioner, as soon as possible, ordered the man to be delivered up; and, after fourteen years’ liberty, he was taken back to slavery in Virginia. Afterwards, bought for $900, and taken back to Harrisburg. Wilkesbarre, Penn., (Summer of 1852.) Mr. Harvey arrested and fined for shielding a slave. Sacramento, California; a man named Lathrop claimed another as his slave, and Judge Fry decided that the claim was good, and ordered the slave to be surrendered. Mr. Lathrop left, with his slave, for the Atlantic States. A beautiful young woman, nearly white, was pursued by her owner [and father] to New York, (end of June, 1852.) There a large reward was offered to a police officer to discover her, place of residence. It was discovered, and...
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