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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Contributions of the Lowell Massachusetts Historical Society

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 2 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were preceded by the contributions by the Old Residents Historical Association of Lowell, Massachusetts. Table of Contents Volume I Bunker Hill, The Battle of, and Those Who Participated Therein from the Towns from which Lowell was Formed, Mrs. Sara Swan Griffin Fiske, Rev. John, by Henry S. Perham Francis, Mrs. Sarah W., by Miss Mabel Hill Lincoln, Abraham, Centennial Anniversary of Introductory Address, Solon W. Stevens Recollections of Lincoln in Lowell in 1848, Samuel P. Hadley Recollections of the Assassination of Lincoln, William M. Clarke Reminiscences of Personal Interviews with Lincoln, Moses G. Parker Lowell High School Historical Essays, 1906 “The Lowell High School, Its History, and the History Its Boys and Girls have Made.” Presentation of Prizes, Alfred P. Sawyer First Prize Essay, Alfred M. Caddell Second Prize Essay, Harold P. Conklin 1907 “The Concord River in History and Literature.” Introduction First Prize Essay, Miss Edith C. Erskine Second Prize Essay, Miss Annie Louise Naylor 1909 “Lowell the Site for a Beautiful City.” First Prize Essay, Miss Tessie G. Curry Second Prize Essay, Miss Geneva AT. Coggins Manning, Manse, The, Mrs. Louise C. Howard Marisquelles, Col. Marie Louis Amand Ansart De, Mrs. Sara Swan Griffin Middlesex County, Ancient and Modern, Levi S. Gould With brief biographical sketches of the men who have served as county commissioners from Lowell and adjacent towns. Middlesex Village, Boyhood Reminiscences of, Samuel P. Hadley Mining Operations near Lowell, Early, Alfred P. Sawyer Old Homes...

Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company of Artillery in th6 Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Albion P. Arnold. Lieutenant Charles B. Bates. Sergeants George W. Armstrong, Sylvanus Fairbanks. Rufus K. Lane. John S. Morrill. Corporals Daniel F. Ayer. William P. Caldwell. Cyrus C. Fairbanks. William Walker. Musicians Charles E. Hodges. Sumner Smith. Privates Allen, George. Allen, Josiah. Atwood, George M Blaisdell, Orrin W. Brown, John W. Butler, Samuel. Campbell, Rufus. Choate, James R. Dudley, Stephen. Earle, Joseph. Fogg, Francis A. Follett, John E. Folsom, Cyrus H. Haines, George W. Hall, Samuel P. Hammond, George W, Jacobs, John. Knowles, Augustus. Knowles, John. Lawton, Daniel. Leeman, Moses D. Lyon, William. Melvin, Adorno L. Moody, Edlon D. Moshier, Stephen. Page, Charles R. Page, David L. Patch, Jonathan. Perkins, William. Pinkham, William, Quint, Ivory. Ramsdell, Harvey. Russell, Samuel B. Stanley, George W. Webster, Nathan. Whittier, Jonathan, Wiggin, James M. Yeaton, Phineas,...

Muster Roll of Captain Joseph Anthony’s Company of Infantry

Muster Roll of Captain Joseph Anthony’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the nineteenth day of April, 1839, when mustered. Captain Joseph Anthony Sergeants Horace S. Cooley Simon Pratt. Epaphrus R. Bryant. S. S. Webster. William H. Clark. Thomas Field. Corporals Charles Hamlin. Henry L. Carter. Micah Safford. E. E. Dennis. Ensign Charles Simmons. Musicians Harrison Stone. James Trask. Privates Blake, Dudley. Bodwell, David. Briggs, John. Cogan, William E. D. Fletcher, Joseph H. Gazlin, Benjamin. Gilley, Isaac F. Godfrey, Adam. Greene, Sumner. Guild, Samuel. Haskell, Greenleaf. Heath, John. Herrin, Samuel. Knowles, Harrison. Lamson, John. Lyon, David. Lyon, Ezra. Morgan, Theophilus. Packard, Sidney. Partridge, John. Place, William. Pray, Edmund, Jr. Robey, John, Jr. Rollins, Joseph. Saben, John. Savage, Daniel, 2d. Trask, Samuel. Wells, Lewis. Wiggins, Ephraim. Wilson, Jesse. Wright, John. Young,...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Loveland Family of Norwich Vermont

One of the farms in Norwich still (1904) owned and occupied by descendants bearing the name of the original settlers, belongs in the Loveland family. Joseph Loveland was born in 1747, in Connecticut; moving from that state to Dartmouth College, Hanover township, New Hampshire, where he enlisted to reinforce the Continental Army at Ticonderoga. In 1778 he settled on a now fertile farm, about a mile and a half from Norwich village, building a home a little off the river road. Ten of his thirteen children were born in town, and six of them made, during most of their lives, their native place their home; dying, with one exception, in the town, at an average age of seventy-two years. Aaron, one of Joseph’s older sons, familiarly known as “The Judge” graduated at Dartmouth in the same class as Daniel Webster, with whom he roomed during part of his college course. Being the best Greek scholar of his class, he had an oration in that language at Commencement. Though a lawyer he lived the life of a recluse; he was ever a conservator of the peace rather than an instigator of litigation. He represented Norwich several times in the legislature, and was Chief Judge of Windsor County court in 1823. He died in 1870, at the advanced age of eighty-nine years. David Loveland, the next younger brother of Aaron, made farming his chief business, at which he worked early and late, with good success. A few years before his death, in 1828, he built a new house on his river farm, about three miles from the village. As his fatherless...

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