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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the first or lower dam was, prior to 1826, a part of Steuben, and was called Narraguagus to distinguish it from the settlement in the southwestern part, which was called “Head of the Bay,” and the post office at Cherryfield was called “Narraguagus” until within some twenty-five years past. What is now the flourishing town of Milbridge was a part of Harrington until 1848. Harrington (No. 5) was incorporated as a town in 1791, Steuben (No. 4) in 1795, Cherryfield (No. 11) in 181G, and the northeast part of Steuben was annexed to Cherryfield in 1826. I find that prior to the incorporation of Harrington, that township and No. 11, Cherryfield, held their plantation meetings and kept their records as one organization. At that time most of the settlers in Harrington lived at Mill River, where the earliest settlement was made. There was no settlement at what is now Harrington village until several years later. I have found it impossible to ascertain the date of the very earliest settlement upon the...

Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

Dahlonega Georgia in 1848

Dahlonega, Georgia, April, 1848 The Cherokee word Dah-lon-e-ga signifies the place of yellow metal; and is now applied to a small hamlet at the foot of the Alleghany Mountains, in Lumpkin County, Georgia, which is reputed to be the wealthiest gold region in the United States. It is recorded of De Soto and his followers that, in the sixteenth century, they explored this entire Southern country in search of gold, and unquestionable evidences of their work have been discovered in various sections of the State. Among these testimonials may be mentioned the remains of an old furnace, and other works for mining, which have been brought to light by recent explorations. But the attention of our own people was first directed to this region while yet the Cherokees were in possession of the land, though the digging of gold was not made a regular business until after they had been politely banished by the General Government. As soon as the State of Georgia had become the rightful possessor of the soil (according to law), much contention and excitement arose among the people as to who should have the best opportunities for making fortunes; and, to settle all difficulties, it was decided by the State Legislature that the country should be surveyed and divided into lots of forty and one hundred and sixty acres, and distributed to the people by lottery. For several years subsequent to that period, deeds of wrong and outrage were practiced to a very great extent by profligate adventurers who flocked to this El Dorado. In the year 1838, however, the Government established a branch Mint...

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Lincoln Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Ahrendsen, Herman. Wf. Annie; ch. Lawrence, Arthur, Alta. P. O. Manning, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 7; O. 80 ac., sec. 8. (9.) Aikman, Geo. R. Wf. Mae; ch. Ethel M. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 26. (38.) Aikman, R. F. Wf. Jennie; ch. Vera, Floyd, Olive, Donald and Myron. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (34.) Asmus, Fred. Wf. Edith; ch. Dwight, Hazel and Harry. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. R. 80 ac., sec. 24. (9.) Owner, John Asmus. Asmus, H. A. Wf. Minnie; ch. Earl. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. R. 240 ac., sec. 25. (32.) Owner, D. Asmus. Asmus, J. J. Wf. Annie; ch. Chris, Willie, Fred and Herman. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 23; O. 120 ac., sec. 9, and in Douglas Twp.,O. 80 ac., sec. 4. (30.) Owner, John Asmus. Asmus, W. F. Wf. Ella. P. O. Audubon, R. 1.R. 160 ac., sec. 35. (27.) Owner, Christina Asmus. Bald, Barbara. Ch. Geo., Jacob and Anna. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. O. 160 ac., sec. 27; O. 80 ac., sec. 28. (43.) Bald, Geo. Wf. Ida; ch. Clara, Mary. Erna, Elsie, Harry, Mardell. P. O. Audubon. R. 6. R. 80 ac., sec. 28. (44.) Owner, Barbara Bald. Bald, Jacob. Wf. Emma; ch. Esther, Herman, Annie, Fritz, Rose, Walter, George. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. R. 160 ac., sec. 27. (43.) Owner, Barbara Bald. Barten, John. Wf. Pauline; ch. Richard, Walter, John and Lorene....

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Todd Family Genealogy

This huge dataset depicts the descent from Christopher Todd (1637-1919), being an effort to give an account, as full as possible of his descendants in America.

Biographical Sketch of Levi Todd

Levi Todd, born in Rindge, N. H., in 1797 or ’98, was educated in the common schools of his neighborhood, and came to Hinsdale when about twenty-one years of age. He was a shoemaker by trade, and built the first shoe shop in the town, and about six months after he came he married Nancy Corey. of Ashburnham, Mass. He followed his trade several years, then gave his attention to manufacturing brick, his brick-yard being the first in the town. He finally bought the farm now occupied by his son “alter C., where he found excellent clay beds. He continued to manufacture brick in all about twenty-five years, then he sold his brick-yard and gave his whole attention to farming. He died in 1873, aged seventy-six years. Mrs. Todd died in 1872, aged seventy-three years. They were the parents of six children, only two of whom are living-Nancy A. (Mrs. James Boyce), of Keene, and Walter C., as previously...

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