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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Cushman Family of Norwich Vermont

The Cushman family in New England dates from the year 1621, the first after the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower, when Robert Cushman, who was a prominent leader and organizer of the Plymouth Colony, brought from England the earliest recruits and supplies to the wasted and famishing settlement. A century and a half later Solomon Cushman, a descendant of Robert, in the sixth generation, born at Plympton, Mass., in 1745, having married Sarah Curtis, daughter of Simeon Curtis, at Lebanon, Conn., in 1768, removed to Norwich, probably in company with the Curtis family. Solomon Cushman (afterward known as Captain Solomon) was in those days a famous hunter and marksman, the terror of bears and catamounts. He once shot and killed a deer at a distance of seventy-two rods1. In the war of the Revolution he served three years as lieutenant in the Norwich militia in the campaign of 1777 against Burgoyne, and the following two years on the northern frontier as captain of a company of Rangers in the regiment of Colonel Timothy Bedel of Haverhill, N. H. His health was much broken as a result of his service in the army. In 1784 he removed to Tunbridge, Vt., where he died in 1799, at the age of fifty-four. His son, Benjamin H. Cushman, born in Norwich, recently died at Tunbridge, upwards of ninety years old, and the father of twelve children. Three years after the removal of Captain Solomon Cushman to Tunbridge, another Solomon Cushman, the fifth in descent from Robert Cushman, the Pilgrim ancestor, came to Norwich from Willington, Conn., with his family. He was...

Biography of Paul Brigham

Hon. Paul Brigham, son of Paul and Catharine (Turner) Brigham, born in Coventry, Connecticut, January 17, 1746; married, October 3, 1767, Lydia Sawyer, of Hebron, Connecticut; came to Norwich from Coventry, in the spring of 1782, bringing his family with him, all of his children having been born in Connecticut. In 1788, he built the house on ”Brigham Hill,” for many years occupied by his great-granddaughter, the late Miss Louisa D. Brigham. The farm had been previously owned and occupied by Elihu Baxter. In what esteem Mr. Brigham was held by the people of his adopted state and town, is shown under appropriate heads in other places in this volume. Captain Paul Brigham in the Revolutionary Army, June-August 1777. Mr. Brigham served four years as Captain in the Continental Army in a Connecticut regiment commanded, first, by Colonel Chandler and afterwards by Colonel Isaac Sherman. He entered the Army January 1, 1777, and was discharged April 22, 1781. A portion of the time he served under the immediate command of Washington, and was engaged in the important battles of Germantown, Monmouth, and Fort Mifflin. He was enlisted by General McDougal from Coventry, Conn., and his regiment seems to have been largely composed of men from that section of the State. We have been privileged to read a fragment of a diary kept by Captain Brigham during a part of his army service above the “Highlands,” which does not cover the time when any of the above named battles were fought (at that time the portion of the army to which he was attached was serving on the Hudson River), and...

Church History of Norwich Vermont

The great achievement of the first generation of Norwich settlers was the building of a meeting house. More than any other event of the time, with the possible exception of the accomplishment of the national independence, this was an undertaking that enlisted the energies and taxed the resources of our forefathers. The building of a meeting house in a New England frontier settlement a century ago was regarded a matter of public concern, to be supported by the whole community without regard to sect or party, like the opening of roads or any other public charge. In less than ten years from the time the first clearing was made in Norwich, the preliminary steps were taken to provide a meeting house to be used for the accommodation of the whole people in the public worship of God. The question of the location of this building was sharply agitated, re-resulting in a keen competition between different sections of the town for the coveted distinction, inasmuch as the location of the house was supposed to fix the site of a possible future village where much of the business of the town would be transacted. When it became apparent that no agreement could be reached, a locating committee of three men from out of town was chosen and summoned upon the ground to decide where the meeting house should stand. The formal report of this Committee as made at the time has recently been found among the papers of the late W. H. Duncan, Esq., of Hanover, N. H., and by the kindness of Honorable Frederick Chase has been furnished to the...

1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and Lane, Hingham Hersey John P., Hingham Sprague J. and S., Hingham Bonney Geo H., Kingston Churchill L., Lakeville Barrows Elijah W., Lakeville Pickens H. C., Lakeville Parlow A. W., Marion Rogers Wm., W. Marshfield Dexter James W., Mattapoisett Jones Eben,...

Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Tilden

Nathaniel Tilden, the immigrant ancestor, came in the ship “Hercules” of Sandwich, England, from Tenterden, England, in March, 1634, bringing with him his wife Lydia, seven children and seven servants. He settled at Scituate where he was living and had a house built according to Parson Lothrop, as early as September, 1634. He was the first ruling elder of the Scituate church, indicating that he was one of the foremost citizens. He held many town offices. His was the third house on Kent street, south of Greenfield lane. He also had lands at Long Marsh, and in 1640 land on the east side of North River below the Gravelly Beach. His will was dated May 25, 1641 and proved July 31, 1641. He bequeathed to his wife; to sons Joseph, Thomas and Stephen; daughters Judith, Mary, Sarah and Lydia; to servants Edward Cinkins and Edward Tarse; his wife was to have a house at Tenterden. His son Joseph. was made executor of the will of his father’s brother, Joseph Tilden, citizen and girdler by trade, of London, February 1, 1642. The widow Lydia and daughters Mary and Sarah were the legatees and this daughter Lydia afterwards married Richard Garrett. Children: Joseph, married Elizabeth Twisden, had the homestead; Thomas (a Thomas came to Plymouth in 1623 and had three lots assigned to him, perhaps the same) ; Mary, married, March 13, 1630, Thomas Lapham; Sarah, married, March 13, 1630, George Sutton; Judith, married Abraham Prebles; Lydia, married Richard Garrett; Stephen, about 1630, mentioned...

Biographical Sketch of Stephen Tilden

(II) Stephen, son of Nathaniel Tilden, was born in England, about 1630-34; married in 1661, Hannah Little, daughter of Thomas Little, of Marshfield. He resided most of the time at Marshfield. Children: Hannah, 1662; Stephen, 1663; Abigail, 1666; Mary, 1668; Judith, 1670; Joseph, mentioned elsewhere; Mercy, 1674; Ruth, 1676; Isaac, 1678; Ephraim....

Biographical Sketch of Joseph Tilden

(III) Joseph, son of Stephen Tilden, was born May 13, 1672. He lived at Scituate and Marshfield. He married, November 30, 1710, Sarah White, who was baptized, an adult, June 20, 1708, at Scituate. He and his wife were admitted to the Scituate church, September 5, 1756. Sarah White was born April 26, 1685, at Scituate, daughter of Timothy White who married in 1678. Abigail, daughter of John Rogers. Timothy was a son of Gowan White of the Conihasset plantation in 1646, who bought a farm of William Richards, in 1650. Children of Joseph and Sarah Tilden : Joseph, born September 20, 1711 ; Christopher, mentioned elsewhere; Benjamin, baptized October 5, 1712; John, born October 1, 1715; Sarah, born May 23, 1718; John, born October i7,...

Biographical Sketch of Christopher Tilden

(IV) Christopher, son of Joseph Tilden, was baptized at Scituate May 4, 1712. He married Sarah Parrot of Boston and lived there. Children, born in Boston: Major David, mentioned elsewhere; Sarah, born March 6, 1743; Abigail, April 17, 1745; Captain Joseph. of Boston, had sons Joseph, Bryant P. and...

Biographical Sketch of Major David Tilden

(V) Major David Tilden, son of Christopher Tilden, was born at Boston, October 5, 1741. He married Joanna. He lived in Boston and Pembroke, Massachusetts and was prominent in the revolution. He was first lieutenant in Captain James Hatch’s company in 1776 and marched from Pembroke to Braintree. He was second major of Colonel John Cushing’s regiment (Second Plymouth county) in 1777 and was in the Rhode Island campaign. He was superintendent of mustering in 1778, in Plymouth county. Children: 1. Sarah, baptized at Pembroke, February 19, 1764. 2. James, mentioned in Deane’s “Scituate.” 3. Christopher, born in Boston, April 12, 1769, mentioned elsewhere. 4. Mary, baptized March 24, 1771. 5. David, baptized at Pembroke, February 28, 1773. 6. Sarah, baptized at Pembroke, February 5, 1775. 7. Nathaniel, baptized at Pembroke, November 3, 1776. 8. Nathaniel, baptized July 26,...
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