Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Thorp, Edith Wallace Mrs. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Mrs. James Thorp passed away Friday morning, July 2, 1937, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W.M. Myers in Enterprise. She suffered a paralytic stroke some time before and nearly recovered from this. Her last illness was of only three weeks duration. The family took the body to Weiser, Idaho, Saturday, and funeral services were held at Cambridge. Edith Wallace was born in Iowa rest of article missing Source: Enterprise Record Chieftain, Enterprise, Oregon, July, 1937 Contributed by: Sue Wells Transcribed by: Belva...

Thorp, Levina Mrs. – Obituary

In La Grande, October 29, 1905. Mrs. Levina Thorp, aged 61 years. Death was due to pneumonia. Deceased had been a resident of Alicel for fourteen years and leaves a host of friends to mourn her loss. She leaves three sons, also a brother, S.L. Brooks, and numerous other relatives. The remains were interred in the Summerville cemetery Tuesday afternoon. Elgin Recorder Friday November 3,...

Lois Todd Turner

TURNER, Lois Todd4, (James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 10, 1729, died 1813, married Aug. 2, 1748, James, son of Joseph and Sarah (Hotchkiss) Turner, who was born May 13, 1727. Children: I. Lois, b. Oct. 12, 1749, m.(???)Ives. II. Bethuel, b. Dec. 27, 1751. III. Mary, b. April 7, 1754, m. Mar. 19, 1770, Hezekiah, son of Jude and Lydia (Atwater) Tuttle, who was b. May 20, 1749. IV. Dorcas, b. Sept. 30, 1756, m.(???)Thorp. V. Edward, d. 1797, m....

Biography of Leonard L. Thorp

LEONARD L. THORP. – This pioneer of the Yakima country is a native of Oregon, having been born in Polk county in 1845. He came to Klikitat county, at the present site of Goldendale, as early as 1858, and to the Yakima in 1861, engaging in stock-raising in the Moxee and Selah valleys until 1870, when he occupied his present place three miles from North Yakima, Washington territory, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres of very rich land. He also owns eighty acres somewhat nearer town, upon which he has an extensive orchard with a very fine exposure, and other requisites for the successful culture of fruit. His principal business is handling large lots of cattle, and delivering them to the various cities of the Sound. The early pioneer days of Mr. Thorp were eventful with the experiences relating to a frontiersman’s life. When he was but a boy of sixteen, the lonely family was surprised one morning by the appearance of an Indian war party bearing down upon the cabin. Hastily hiding the women in the feather beds, the father and son stationed themselves behind the fence out of sight of the Indians, who were approaching, with old Smohallah at their head, to reconnoiter. They were armed and mounted, and were decked with war paint. As they reached the fence, the elder Thorp sprang over the fence and seized the chief’s horse by the bridle, covering Smohallah himself with his revolver, and demanding the reason for such a warlike approach. Being quick-witted, the old Indian smiled and offered to shake hands in friendly fashion, saying, by way...

Biography of Fielden M. Thorp

FIELDEN M. THORP. – Mr. Thorp is spoken of as rough in his exterior, but as having a warm heart, a man who has taken great interest in improving the Indians among whom he has lived, and as of such strict honesty that his word is taken everywhere to be as good as hi bond. He is every inch a frontiersman, and is the son of a frontiersman who ranged over Missouri before that region was set off as a state. This old father was, moreover, a veteran and pensioner of the war of 1812. Fielden left Missouri in 1844 for the Pacific coast, coming across the plains with a party of twenty-six men, and a train of twelve wagons. Much of the way led through sage-brush’ and, as was customary; the head team of one day took the rear the next day, each one thus taking a turn at breaking the brush. The trip down the Columbia from The Dalles was effected by rafts as usual; but Mr. Thorp, with one other man, added to this the feat of shooting the Cascades in a canoe, perhaps the only craft of this kind that ever came safely through that fearful torrent. The Hudson’s Bay People might well have looked upon those “Missourians” as bearing a charmed life, when, unused to water, they safely took such risks. Making a landing near the present site of Portland, Mr. Thorp went out to the Tualatin Plains, finding employment in splitting rails to an extent sufficient to procure, with the proceeds of this labor, provisions for the winter; and after that he went...

Pin It on Pinterest