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Lovering Family Genealogy of Taunton Massachusetts

Through much of the nineteenth century there figured prominently in the business and social life of Taunton — continuing to do so at the present — the family bearing the name introducing this sketch. Reference is made to the late Hon. Willard Lovering, long one of the leading manufacturers not only of Taunton, but of the great manufacturing region thereabout, in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island, a representative in the Massachusetts Assembly, bank president, etc.; and to his sons and grandsons, the former being the late Charles L., the late Hon. William C. and Hon. Henry Morton Lovering, all of whom are or have been officers in the Whittenton Manufacturing Company and among the leading business men and citizens of their city, William C. having been the representative in the United States Congress from the 12th and 14th Massachusetts districts. The home town of this Taunton Lovering family for generations was Holliston, where the name was well represented in the struggle of the colonies for independence, and from which town and vicinity went out into other localities men of achievement. It was from this Holliston stock sprang the eminent lawyer, Hon. Warren Lovering, of Medway, born Feb. 21, 1797, who was often a member of the State Assembly, a member of the executive council for some years in the thirties, at the time being in warm personal relations with the then governor of Massachusetts, the Hon. Edward Everett, Bank Commissioner, etc.; and his brother, the late Hon. Amos Lovering, lawyer and judge, who figured prominently in the South and West. These were the sons of Amos and Lucy (Day)...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Biography of Captain Alden Partridge

The subject of this sketch was the second son of Samuel, Jr. and Elizabeth (Wright) Partridge, and was born at Norwich, Feb. 12, 1785, on the farm where his father and grandfather located when they came to this town. He remained at home, doing the work that fell to the lot of the sons of New England farmers in those days, until he entered Dartmouth College in 1802. He continued his course in college until 1805, when he entered the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, being the first person from his native town to enter that institution. After his graduation at the academy he filled many positions on the academic staff there, besides being superintendent of the academy at different times. In 1817 he resigned his commission of captain in the corps of engineers. Captain Partridge was chief of the American party in running a northeastern boundary, in 1819, between this country and Canada, under the Fifth Article of the Treaty of Ghent; Surveyor General of Vermont, 1823: represented his native town in the legislature in 1833, 1834, 1837, and 1839; three times his party’s candidate for Congress, but unsuccessful, as the district was largely of a different political coloring. In 1812, Dartmouth College conferred upon him the honorary degree of A. M., and the University of Vermont did likewise in 1821, it being the only honorary degree conferred by that corporation that year. In the same year the Presidency of that institution was offered him, only to be declined by him. Captain Partridge was a noted pedestrian, on several occasions walking sixty miles a day, and...

Biography of George Musalas Colvocoresses

Born in Scio, Grecian Archipelago, October 22, 1816. During the Greek Revolution the Turks invaded that island in 1822, and after narrowly escaping the massacre that followed, George with his mother and two young sisters were carried captives to Smyrna. Through friends in that city he was ransomed and sent in an American brig to Baltimore; much kindness was shown him by members of the Greek Relief Committee, and the story of his misfortunes excited the sympathy of Captain Alden Partridge, head of the military academy then at Norwich, who offered to receive and provide for young Colvocoresses as his son. Accordingly, he was sent to Norwich and his kind benefactor educated him in his military academy and secured for him an appointment in the United States Navy in 1832. He was a passed midshipman in the Wilkes Exploring Expedition in the Pacific, 1838- ’42, and saw service in all parts of the world during his naval career. He married Miss Eliza Freelon Halsey, niece of Captain Thomas W. Freelon, U. S. N., in 1846, and Norwich continued to be his home until 1863, As lieutenant and second in command of the U. S. S. “Levant,” on the China station, he took part in the bombardment and capture of the Barrier Forts in the Canton River. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was ordered to the U. S. S. “Supply” and promoted to commander; while in this ship he captured the “Stephen Hart” of Liverpool, loaded with arms and ammunition for the rebels. He was in constant service along the Atlantic coast and in the Gulf of...

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that there were here, as in most other towns throughout the north, a few disloyal spirits who sympathized with the Slaveholders’ rebellion, who denounced the war from beginning to end, and who scarcely concealed their satisfaction when news came of rebel...

Biographical Sketch of Ambrose Swasey

Swasey, Ambrose; manufacturer; born, Exeter, N. H., Dec. 19, 1846; son of Nathaniel and Abigail Chesley (Peavey) Swasey; early education in schools of Exeter; degree of engineering Case School of Applied Science, 1905; Sc. D. Denison University, Granville, O., 1910; married, Hampton, N. IL, Oct. 24, 1871, Lavinia D. Marston, daughter of David and Sarah Ann (Dearborn) Marston; entered into partnership with W. R. Warner (Warner & Swasey), 1880, mfrs. machine tools and astronomical instruments; the 36-inch Lick telescope, the 26-inch of Naval observatory, Washington, the 40-inch Yerkes telescope, as well as a new and exceptionally accurate dividing engine, are some of the firm’s achievements; invented Swasey Range and Position Finder, adopted by the United States Government; pres. The Warner & Swasey Co., pres. the Caxton Building Co.; director the Cleveland Trust Co.; Chevalier Legion of Honor, France, 1900; trustee of Denison University, Granville, O.; vice pres. Y. M. C. A.; past pres. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, N. Y.; past pres. the Cleveland Engineering Society; past pres. Chamber of Commerce; member Institution of Mechanical Engineers of Great Britain and British Astronomical Assn; fellow Royal Astronomical Society; member Country Club, Cleveland; Engineers Club, N. Y., University Club,...

Biographical Sketch of John Swasey

John Swasey, formerly a well-known merchant of Clarcmont, was born in Canterbury, N.H., July 21, 1785. He engaged in mercantile pursuits in Claremont, and conducted a profitable business until his death, which occurred October 13, 1835, at the age of fifty years. Mr. Swasey married Sally Robinson, a native of Epping, N.H., and a daughter of Noah and Sally Robinson. Mrs. Swasey became the mother of six daughters; namely, Ann Elizabeth, Sophia Charlotte, Sarah Jane, Lydia Ann, Adeline Maria, and Juliette Frances. Ann Elizabeth married Captain Alden Partridge, a military man of note, who founded a military college in Norwich, Vt. Her children were: George, who is no longer living; and Henry V. Sophia Charlotte, who became the wife of General Edward Phelps, a prominent resident of Cold Brook, Conn., died in 1893. Lydia Ann is now deceased. Adeline Maria married Lieutenant George M. Colvocoresses, who was in the United States Navy during the Civil War, and remained in the service after its close. He had risen in his profession to a position from which his advancement would have been rapid, when he was accidentally killed in Bridgeport, Conn., while on his way to New York. He was twice married, and had four children by his first union. Miss Sarah Jane Swasey and Mrs. Colvocoresses are residing in Claremont. Mrs. John Swasey died October 11,...

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