Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Staples Family of Taunton, MA

STAPLES (Taunton family). The Staples name is one of long and honorable standing in New England and the country. The family has been a continuous one in the Bay State for two hundred and seventy and more years, and at Taunton, in this Commonwealth, have lived generation after generation of the name down to the present – a worthy race, one representative of the best type of citizenship. Such men in more recent generations as the two Sylvanus Staples, father and son, and the latter’s son Sylvanus Nelson Staples, and the two Ebenezer Staples and Abiel B. Staples – all in line – have played well their part in the affairs of their communities in their day and generation. The Taunton Staples spring from the ancient Weymouth family of the name, from John Staple (the common spelling both in England and America at that period omitting the final “s”), who appears on the records of that town, it is said, in 1636. His wife’s name is given as Rebecca by the late Joseph W. Potter, of Bangor, Maine. John Staple became a freeman of the Colony May 10, 1648. He died July 4, 1683, in Dorchester, leaving according to his will, children John, Jr., of Braintree, Joseph of Taunton, Abraham of Mendon, Rebecca, wife of Samuel Sumner of Dorchester, and Sarah, wife of Increase Sumner, also of Dorchester. John Staple’s son Abraham was a proprietor of Mendon. He married in 1660 Mary, daughter of Robert Randall, of Weymouth, was a weaver by trade, served in King Philip’s war, and was known – probably from service in the militia –...

Descendants of Jonathan White, Brockton, MA

HON. JONATHAN WHITE, for sixty years a member of the Plymouth county bar and a citizen of note in what is now Brockton, Plymouth Co., Mass., was born Aug. 22, 1819, in that part of Randolph called East Randolph (now Holbrook), Norfolk Co., Mass., son of Jonathan and Abigail (Holbrook) White. The Whites have lived in this section of Massachusetts from the time of the earliest settlements, and the members of the family in every generation have upheld the honorable name. Mr. White’s lineage from the immigrant ancestor follows: Thomas White, probably from England, was in Weymouth as early as 1635, a member of the church there. He was admitted a freeman of Massachusetts Colony March 3, 1635-36. His name appears upon the earliest records of Weymouth. He was many years one of the selectmen of the town, and was often chosen on important committees. He was in command of a military company and was representative in the General Court in 1637, 1640, 1657 and 1670. His age is stated in a deposition in 1659 as about sixty years. His will was proved Aug. 28, 1679. His children living at date of his will were: Joseph (married Lydia Rogers); Hannah (married Capt. John Baxter); Samuel, born in 1642 (married Mary Dyer); Thomas; and Ebenezer, born in 1648 (married Hannah Phillips). Thomas White (2), born in Weymouth, married Mary, daughter of Matthew Pratt, and settled in Braintree. He was made a freeman in 1681, and had a high social position. He died April 11, 1706. His will was proved May 16, 1706. His children were: Thomas married Mehetabel Adams; Mary...

Descendants of Joseph Borden of Fall River MA

BORDEN (Fall River family – line of Joseph, fourth generation). The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conquerer, and after the battle of Hastings  – in A. D. 1066 – was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where they resided being named Borden. One John Borden, of a later generation, moved to Wales early in the seventeenth century, where his sons Richard and John were married. These sons returned to Borden, in England, and in May, 1635, embarked for America. (I) Richard Borden is found a settler in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1638, in which year he was admitted an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck, and in that same year was allotted five acres of land. He figured in the surveying and platting of the lands thereabout in 1639, and in the year following was one of those appointed to lay out the lands in Porstmouth, R. I. He was assistant in 1653 and 1654; general treasurer in 1654-55; commissioner in 1654-55-56-57; and deputy in 1667 and 1670. He bought land in Providence in 1661, and not far from 1667 became one of the original purchasers of land in New Jersey from the Indians. He...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the first or lower dam was, prior to 1826, a part of Steuben, and was called Narraguagus to distinguish it from the settlement in the southwestern part, which was called “Head of the Bay,” and the post office at Cherryfield was called “Narraguagus” until within some twenty-five years past. What is now the flourishing town of Milbridge was a part of Harrington until 1848. Harrington (No. 5) was incorporated as a town in 1791, Steuben (No. 4) in 1795, Cherryfield (No. 11) in 181G, and the northeast part of Steuben was annexed to Cherryfield in 1826. I find that prior to the incorporation of Harrington, that township and No. 11, Cherryfield, held their plantation meetings and kept their records as one organization. At that time most of the settlers in Harrington lived at Mill River, where the earliest settlement was made. There was no settlement at what is now Harrington village until several years later. I have found it impossible to ascertain the date of the very earliest settlement upon the...

Descendants of Edmund Hobart

The East Bridgewater family bearing this name, the head of which was the late Hon. Aaron Hobart, long one of the town’s leading citizens and substantial men, and whose father before Him, Hon. Aaron Hobart, was an eminent lawyer and efficient public servant, holding many positions of trust and responsibility, State senator, member of the United States Congress, etc., is a branch of the older Abington Hobart family, in which town the Hobarts were long prominent, and that a branch of the still older Hingham family of the name. It is the purpose here to consider the East Bridgewater Hobart family only. The name there is perpetuated and being worthily worn and the family reputation sustained by the posterity of Judge Aaron Hobart. There follows in chronological order from the first American Hobart ancestor and somewhat in detail the family history and genealogy. (I) Edmund Hobart, from Hingham, in the County of Essex, England, and born in that parish about 1570, came to this country, arriving in 1633 at Charlestown, and with his son, Thomas, and several others, came to “Bare Cove” the same year, probably for the purpose of assisting in establishing a new plantation, but it is generally thought that he did not locate there permanently until the arrival of his son, Rev. Peter, and those who came with him. He was an early settler of Hingham, one of those who drew their home lots on Town (North) street Sept. 18, 1635. He married (first) Margaret Dewey, who was the mother of his children, and (second) Oct. 10, 1634, Mrs. Sarah Lyford, widow of Rev. John. Mr....

Free Masonry in Norwich Vermont

It does not appear that any Masonic Lodge has ever existed in Norwich. Quite a number of our citizens, however, as might be expected, have at different times belonged to lodges in adjacent towns. In the list of members of Franklin Lodge, established at Hanover, N. H., in 1796, we find the names of the following Norwich men, with the year of their admission: Reuben Hatch, Freegrace Leavitt (1798), William Sumner (1799), Thomas Brigham, Erastus Leavitt, and Moses Hayward (1800), Reuben Partridge, Andrew Dewey, William Little, Levi Richards, Aaron West (1801-1807), Lyman Lewis, Elijah Slafter, Simon Baldwin, Enos Lewis, Jasper Johnson, Noah Lewis (1808), Charles Hutchins, Sewell Gleason (1809), Ephraim Hall, George Olds, Jr., and Pierce Burton (1810), Manly G. Woodbury, Silas Morse, Ammi B. Allen, and Barzilla Bush, Jr. (1813-1820). The roll probably bears other Norwich names that we do not now recognize. The Franklin Lodge was moved to Lebanon in 1821, where it still flourishes. In 1807 and 1808, Doctor Thomas Brigham of Norwich was master of the lodge, who, on his sudden departure from town and abandonment of his family, was promptly expelled therefrom by notice published in the Vermont Journal at Windsor, in April, 1809, ”for immoral conduct unworthy a Mason and a gentleman.” Other Norwich Masons of that time, not of the Franklin Lodge, were Captain Calvin Seaver, Jeremiah Bissell, Ebenezer Spear, 2nd, Lyman Baldwin, and William Leconte. At the height of the Anti-Masonic agitation, about 1830, a great commotion was raised in the North Congregational Church, growing out of the refusal of the majority of the church, led by Deacon Israel Newton, to...

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January.1 It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the spring of 1776, by both Colonel Bedell and Colonel Warner. Again on the 7th of March Colonel Morey writes to the New Hampshire Committee of Safety: “Some recruiting officers from Colonel Warner‘s party [regiment] have enlisted a considerable number of fine men, they had the money to...

Biography of George A. Sumner

George A. Sumner, a popular storekeeper and real estate owner of Hill, was born on the place where he now resides, June 27, 1839, son of George W. and Hannah (Abrams) Sumner. [For the full genealogy of the Sumner family the reader is referred to the account of Governor Increase Sumner, to be found in the General Register.] George Sumner is a direct descendant of Edward Sumner, a Revolutionary patriot, who for a long time would not allow tea to be served on his table, and who was one of the Boston Tea Party. Edward’s son, Nathaniel, by his wife Hannah Bullock Sumner, was also a prominent patriot, and a man of large property and much influence. Nathaniel had a numerous family of children, and gave each of his sons a farm. George, the next in line, married Margaret Lewis. One of his children, who was grandfather of the subject of this sketch, settled in New Boston, N.H. Grandfather Sumner married Lydia Winchester. He bought a farm in Deering, N.H. He was noted in the district for his indomitable courage. George W. Sumner, at the age of nineteen, after having helped his father in clearing the Deering property, left his home and applied himself to learning the clothing business. He came to Hill and engaged in wool carding and cloth dressing, constructing a dam and erecting a mill for these purposes. In 1825 he built a fine brick house, which is still one of the most prominent structures in the town. He married Hannah Abrams in 1822; and his children were: Mary, Ellen, Catherine, Jane, George A., and Sarah....

Biography of Henry G. Sumner

Sumner, Henry G., Bristol, grandfather of Hiram S. Sumner, of Bristol Flats, Vt. Henry G. married Sally Hall, and to them were born a large family, of whom Thomas, the father of Hiram S., was the eldest. He married Dorcas M. Fuller, of Potsdam, St. Lawrence county, N. Y., where they resided until 1841, when they settled in Middlebury, Vt., where they engaged in farming. They had a family of four children born to them — Charlotte, Mrs. Elia Austin, of Bristol, Vt.; Mary E., now Mrs. Harrison Gove, of Bristol, Vt. After the death of his first wife he married Harriet Boynton, a daughter of David Boynton, of New Haven, Vt., and by her had one child — Frank B., born on January 21, 1856. He married Libbie C. Laird, a daughter of John Laird, of Middlebury, Vt., who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He purchased his mill property in 1883 from George N. Varney. They had a farm of thirty-five acres, and also has eighty-four swarms of bees. Henry and George Henry Sumner were twins. They settled on farms in the south, part of Bristol, Vt., which are now occupied by Robert Place, and which is a part of the estate of the late James Barry. Henry G. married Sally Hall, and by her had a family of two children, one of whom grew to maturity — Seneca,. who was married twice. His first wife was Sylvia Mills, a daughter of Ralph Mills, by whom he had a family of two children — Carlos C. and Delia M. His second wife was Mrs. Albert C....

Pin It on Pinterest