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Slave Narrative of Isaac Stier

Interviewer: Edith Wyatt Moore Person Interviewed: Isaac Stier Location: Natchez, Mississippi Date of Birth: Jefferson County MS “Miss, my name is Isaac Stier, but folks calls me ‘Ike.’ I was named by my pappy’s young Marster an’ I aint never tol’ nobody all o’ dat name. It’s got twenty-two letters in it. It’s wrote but in de fam’ly Bible. Dat’s how I knows I’ll be one hund’ed years old if I lives ’til de turn o’ de year. I was born in Jefferson County ‘tween Hamburg an’ Union Church. De plantation joined de Whitney place an’ de Montgomery place, too. I b’longed to Marse Jeems Stowers. I don’t rightly ‘member how many acres my Marster owned, but ’twas a big plantation wid eighty or ninety head o’ grown folks workin’ it. No tellin’ how many little black folks dey was. “My mammy was Ellen Stier an’ my pappy was Jordon Stier. He was bought to dis country by a slave dealer from Nashville, Tennessee. Dey traveled all de way through de Injun Country on afoot. Dey come on dat Trace road. Twant nothin’ but a Injun Trail. “When dey got to Natchez de slaves was put in de pen ‘tached to de slave markets. It stood at de forks o’ St. Catherine Street an’ de Liberty road. Here dey was fed an’ washed an’ rubbed down lak race hosses. Den dey was dressed up an’ put through de paces dat would show off dey muscles. My pappy was sol’ as a twelve year old, but he always said he was nigher twenty. “De firs’ man what bought him was...

Biography of W. L. Stowers

W. L. STOWERS. A popular resort for the traveling public and people of this city is the West Plains Hotel, which was first opened in 1883, and is conducted by W. L. Stowers, one of the prominent business men in the city. Mr. Stowers, who is a most genial and obliging host, was born in Marion County, Missouri, August 2, 1843, son of Samuel and America (Whaley) Stowers. Samuel Stowers was born in Virginia in 18O5 to the union of Colman and Nancy (Conway) Stowers, natives of the Old Dominion. The grandfather came to Ralls County, Missouri, as early as 1825 and followed farming, but he was a manufacturer of machinery while residing in Virginia. He was one among the early pioneers of Missouri, and made his home in Ralls County until his death in 1853. He was with the old Whig party and was a prominent man in the county. His wife died in Ralls County about 1851 or 1852, and they were members of the old Ironside Baptist Church. Three daughters and two sons were born to them: Anna, Susan, Nellie, Thomas and Samuel. None of these are living. Samuel Stowers, father of subject, was a young man when he came to this State, this being a year or so before his father came, and he settled in Ralls County and married Miss Whaley. From there they moved to Marion County, and there Mrs. Stowers died in 1847. Two years later Mr. Stowers emigrated overland to California and took his oldest son, Thomas Coleman Stowers, with him. He made the trip in about nine months, and he...

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