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A History of Peaks Island Maine and its People

A history of Peaks Island and its people: also a short history of House Island, Portland, Maine. In presenting this history of two of the best known islands in Portland Harbor, it has been the intention of the author to give only the story of the early days of those islands, and of the families who have contributed to their history.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Big Mound City Archaeological Zone

Big Mound City is the only site from the Belle Glade culture on the National Register of Historic Places.1 It was added in 1973 as an example of a Calusa ceremonial complex, but is now understood to have originally been constructed by the same ethnic group that built the Ortona and Wakate towns – probably ancestors of the Mayaimi. Even though its earthworks are about 1000 to 1500 years older than those of Fort Center, the architecture was extremely similar. Its final phase of occupation was probably by an ethnic group either related to the Tekesta or Mayaimi, but under the political domination of the Calusa. This large archaeological zone is located on a geographical boundary, where the Everglades portion of the Lake Okeechobee Basin meets the Pinewood Flats.2 It has been theorized that the location was either a convenient place for ceremonial activities or trading, perhaps both activities. The environs of this ceremonial site were flooded at least six months out of the year. The earthworks would have raised any temples or houses above the floodwaters. This is also an architectural trait of several cultures in the Upper Amazon Basin of Brazil and Peru. The similarity may be evidence of a cultural connection or mere coincidence. What really makes Big Mound City stand out among large town sites in the Southeastern United States are the paired earth berms that connect conical mounds of various sizes to a central crescent shaped causeway that even today is nine feet high and nine feet wide across the top. The earth berms form radians that seem to have astronomical functions, but to...

Biography of Paul Brigham

Hon. Paul Brigham, son of Paul and Catharine (Turner) Brigham, born in Coventry, Connecticut, January 17, 1746; married, October 3, 1767, Lydia Sawyer, of Hebron, Connecticut; came to Norwich from Coventry, in the spring of 1782, bringing his family with him, all of his children having been born in Connecticut. In 1788, he built the house on ”Brigham Hill,” for many years occupied by his great-granddaughter, the late Miss Louisa D. Brigham. The farm had been previously owned and occupied by Elihu Baxter. In what esteem Mr. Brigham was held by the people of his adopted state and town, is shown under appropriate heads in other places in this volume. Captain Paul Brigham in the Revolutionary Army, June-August 1777. Mr. Brigham served four years as Captain in the Continental Army in a Connecticut regiment commanded, first, by Colonel Chandler and afterwards by Colonel Isaac Sherman. He entered the Army January 1, 1777, and was discharged April 22, 1781. A portion of the time he served under the immediate command of Washington, and was engaged in the important battles of Germantown, Monmouth, and Fort Mifflin. He was enlisted by General McDougal from Coventry, Conn., and his regiment seems to have been largely composed of men from that section of the State. We have been privileged to read a fragment of a diary kept by Captain Brigham during a part of his army service above the “Highlands,” which does not cover the time when any of the above named battles were fought (at that time the portion of the army to which he was attached was serving on the Hudson River), and...

Early Residents of Helena, Montana

Isaac D. McCutcheon, born in New York in 1840, removed to Mich, with his parents in 1846, and was there educated. He began teaching school at the age of 18 years, and continued to teach for 5 years, after which he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1868. He practised his profession in Charlotte, Michigan, until 1882, when he was appointed secretary of Montana. He resigned in 1883 to return to the practice of the law. F. S. Witherbee, born in Flint, Michigan, in 1860, removed to Louisville, in 1873. He was educated for a physician, graduating in Philadelphia 1883, but not liking his profession, he became a publisher in Washington D.C. He sold out his business in 1888, and came to Helena, where he engaged in real estate, organizing the Witherbee and Hunter Estate, Loan, Investment Co., Limited. O. K. Allen, born in the state of New York, in 1852, received a collegiate education, and in 1876 went to Colorado, where he remained until 1883, when he came to Montana and engaged in mining. In 1880 he acquired the Gould mine, and organized a stock company to develop the property. The mine has produced over $1,000,000, and is still producing richly. F. P. Sterling was born in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, in 1843, and was educated in his native town. In 1861 he entered the union army, serving through the war, after which he removed to Iowa, and engaged in school teaching until 1874, when he came to Montana. In 1876 he was appointed register of the U. 8. Land Office at Helena, serving until1883. The following...

Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the Big Stoner, in what is now the eastern part of Clark County. Two years later another group of families with their slaves came to join this little settlement. In some cases the owners were good to their slaves had comfortable quarters for them at a reasonable distance from the main house. Their clothing was given them as they needed it. In most instances the clothing was made on the plantation Material woven, and shoes made. The cabins were one and two rooms, maybe more if the families were large. The slaves ate their meals in the kitchen of the main house. A cruel and inhuman master was ostrazied and taught by the silent contempt of his neighbors a lesson which he seldom failed to learn. In 1789 the general assembly passed an act in which good treatment was enjoined upon master and all contracts between master and slaves were forbidden. The execution of this law was within the jurisdiction of the county courts which were directed to admonish the...

Biographical Sketch of Frederick Augustine Sterling

Sterling, Frederick Augustine; merchant; born, Chapinville, Conn., May 26, 1831; son of Frederick Augustine and Caroline Mary (Dutcher) Sterling; educated, public and private schools, Geneva, N. Y.; married, Meadville, Pa., May 13, 1856, Emma Betts; issue, one son, living in Erie, Pa.; merchant in Cleveland since 1850; connected with T. S. Beckwith & Co., Beckwith, Sterling & Co., Sterling & Co., The Sterling & Welch Co., pres. the Sterling & Welch Co., director Union National Bank; director Citizens Savings & Trust Co.; vice pres. Cleveland Burial Case Co.; pres. Board of Trustees, Second Presbyterian Church; member Union and Country Clubs. Favorite pastime:...

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