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Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon Strong. His children were: Jerome Hutchinson, see further; John Hutchinson, who removed to New York State, where he died; Lydia Hutchinson, who was probably the first child born in Norwich, married D. Hammond, of Thetford; Abigail Hutchinson, married Honorable John...

Narrative of the Captivity of Quintin Stockwell – Indian Captivities

Quintin Stockwell, Who was taken at Deerfield, in Massachusetts, by a Party of Inland Indians, in the Year 1677; Communicated in his own Words, and Originally Published by the Eminent Dr. Increase Mather, in the Year 1684. A particular account of the interruption in which Stockwell and others fell into the hands of the Indians will be found in the Book of the Indians, Book iii, p. 97 and 98. Out of twenty-four at that time killed and taken, we learn the names only of these; Quintin Stockwell, John Root, Sergeant Plimpton, Benjamin Stebbins, his wife, Benjamin Waite, and Samuel Russell. Plimpton was burnt in their cruel manner, Root was killed, and Stebbins escaped. Of the others I have learned nothing. In the year 1677, September the 19th, between sunset and dark, the Indians came upon us. I and another man, being together, we ran away at the outcry the Indians made, shouting and shooting at some others of the English that were hard by. We took a swamp that was at hand for our refuge; the enemy espying us so near them, run after us, and shot many guns at us; three guns were discharged upon me, the enemy being within three rods of me, besides many others before that. Being in this swamp, which was miry, I slumped in and fell down, whereupon one of the enemy stepped to me, with his hatchet lifted up to knock me on the head, supposing that I had been wounded and so unfit for any other travel. I, as it happened, had a pistol by me, which, though uncharged, I...

Biographical Sketch of Richard Stebbins, M.D.

Richard Stebbins, M.D., and druggist, was born in Springfield, Mass., in 1824. He was educated for a physician; removed to Council Bluffs in 1857, and engaged in the practice of medicine; remained there six months; removed to Onawa, and continued the practice of his profession, and engaged in the drug business in 1864. He was married in 1859 to Mary J. Billings, and has a son and a...

Biographical Sketch of Elihu Stebbins

Rowland Stebbins, born in 1594, came from Ipswich, Eng., on the Francis in 1634, landed at Roxbury, but probably went to the Connecticut River the following year with William Pynchon, the founder of the city of Springfield. Thence he moved to Northampton, about 1656, where he died, December 14, 1671. His wife died at Springfield, October 4, 1649, aged fifty-eight years. Elihu Stebbins, whose ancestors resided in Northfield, was a lineal descendant of Rowland. He was born in 1762, settled in Hinsdale, and married, March 24, 1786, Lucretia,. daughter of Eldad Wright, who was taken from him by death, December 7, 1843, at the age of eighty years. Elihu died April, 23, 1846, aged eighty-four years. Elihu, Jr., born here in 1794, married Sarah G., daughter of Seth Hooker and granddaughter of Rev. Bunker Gay. She organized the first Sunday-school in town, and the venerable Lewis Taylor was appointed its first superintendent. Mr. Stebbins located as a farmer on the homestead of his father, where he remained until his death, at the ripe age of seventy-seven years. He ever took an active interest in town affairs, and repeatedly represented his townsmen in the state legislature and held the office of selectman. His children were John Mills Stebbins, born December 27, 1825, who graduated at Dartmouth college in 1848, and is now a lawyer of Springfield. Mass., of which city he was mayor in 1874; Sarah H., born July 31, 1831, died October 31, 1866; and Edward, born March 10. 1834, owner of the old homestead. He resides in Hinsdale village, being, one of its leading merchants and is also...

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Stebbins

Samuel Stebbins came from Hartland, Conn., in 1804, with his family, consisting of his wife, Sarah Boardman, and six children, Eleanora, Sarah, Harlow, Sophia, Melissa, and Jerusha. Mr. Stebbins came here first in 1803 and built that year the rear portion of the Medbury House on the site of which he settled, and where, in company with Bela Scoville, he kept tavern till about 1809. He died March 6, 1833, aged 74, and his wife, September 4, 1833, aged 70. He was a Revolutionary...

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