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Slave Narrative of Millie Simpkins

Person Interviewed: Millie Simpkins Location: Nashville, Tennessee Age: 109 Place of Residence: 1004 10th Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee “Black Mamie” I claims I’s 109 ye’ars ole en wuz bawn neah Winchester, Tennessee. Mah marster wuz Boyd Sims en mah missis wuz Sarah Ann Ewing Sims. Mah mammy wus named Judy Ewing en mah daddy wuz Moses Stephens en he wus “free bawn.” He wuz de marster’s stable boy en followed de races. He run ‘way en nebber kum back. Mah fust missis wuz very rich. She had two slave ‘omen ter dress her eve’y mawnin’ en I brought her breakfust ter her on a silvah waitah. She wuz ma’ied three times, her second husband wuz Joe Carter en de third wuz Judge Gork. Mah fust missis sold me kaze I wuz stubborn. She sent me ter de “slave yard” at Nashville. De yard wuz full ob slaves. I stayed dere two weeks ‘fore marster Simpson bought me. I wuz sold ‘way fum mah husband en I nebber se’d ‘im ‘gin. I had one chile which I tuk wid me. De slave yard wuz on Cedar Street. A Mr. Chandler would bid de slaves off, but ‘fore dey started biddin’ you had ter tek all ob yo Clothes off en roll down de hill so dey could see dat you didn’t hab no bones broken, er sores on yer. (I wouldin’ tek mine off). Ef nobody bid on you, you wuz tuk ter de slave mart en sold. I wuz sold dere. A bunch ob dem wuz sent ter Mississippi en dey had dere ankles fas’end tergedder en dey had ter...

Biographical Sketch of William A. Sims M.D.

William A. Sims, M. D. is a son of William and Julia (Cooke) Sims, who are Tennesseans, born in 1826 and 1833 respectively. They were married in west Tennessee and immediately located in Crockett County where they have since resided. Of eight children born to them five are living, four sons and one daughter. Three of the sons are physicians and one is a teacher, though all have taught school. Both parents and all the children are members of the Christian Church. Dr. William A. Sims was born January 15, 1857 in Crockett County. His early education was quite limited as his father was poor and unable to give his children good advantages, but they all have acquired good educations through their own efforts. The Doctor taught school for some time and in 1878 began the study of medicine under Dr. W. T. MacLine. In 1880-81 he attended lectures in the University of Tennessee, and in the latter year opened an office five miles west of Tiptonville, where he practiced until 1883 and then completed his course at the Eclectic Medical Institute, at Cincinnati, Ohio graduating the same year. Soon after, he located in Tiptonville, where he has since resided and has an extensive practice. In 1883 he married Lillian McCulloch, who was born in Gibson County, Tennessee, December 11, 1861. They have one child, Ernest C. Dr. Sims is a democrat and his wife is a member of the Christian...

Biography of William Sims, Major

Maj. William Sims. The late Maj. William Sims, whose death occurred July 23, 1907, on his farm in Shawnee County, Kansas, had an enviable record both as a soldier of the Civil war and as a citizen in the years that followed that struggle. He was born May 15, 1831, on a farm in Muskingum County, Ohio, and was a son of Mahlon and Myron (Riley) Sims. He grew to manhood in his native community, securing his scholastic training in the common schools, and when still a young man served for a number of years as a clerk in the office of the probate judge. At the breaking out of the Civil war, he enlisted in Company G, Thirty-second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and when the company was organized he was made orderly sergeant. Later a company was taken out of his regiment to man a battery and Mr. Sims was sent back home to recruit a new company to fill the vacancy. While he was absent upon this duty, his regiment was captured at Harper’s Ferry. His command then became Company A, Ninth Ohio Cavalry, of which he was made captain, and subsequently he was at the siege of Knoxville, where he was filling the post of major by promotion. Owing to ill health, he was compelled to resign from active service at the front, and from that time until 1866 was employed in the quartermaster’s department. When he received his honorable discharge, Major Sims returned to Ohio, where he engaged in farming, and so continued for two years, then removing to DeWitt County, Illinois, there carrying on...

Biography of John Thomas Sims

John Thomas Sims, who many years ago secured prestige as one of the most forcible lawyers of the Kansas City, Kansas, bar and is now serving as judge of the Probate Court of Wyandotte County has had his share of the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. His early life was one of hard and continuous work, often ill repaid, and again and again overtaken with calamity or disaster. He tried farming in the early days of Kansas, and various other occupations, and again and again when prosperity seemed to smile upon him he was put back at the beginning by drought or some other of the numerous calamities which are so familiar in Kansas history. Judge Sims was born at Robinson, Crawford County, Illinois, December 31, 1864. He was one of eleven children, four of whom are still living, and is the only one in Kansas. His parents were Thomas Jefferson and Arminta McComas (Elledge) Sims. His father was born in Virginia, was a blacksmith and wagon-maker by trade, and for a number of years followed merchant milling, having a mill on the banks of the Wabash River on the Illinois side. He lived in Illinois until his death about 1877. Judge Sims’ mother was born in Kentucky in 1828 and died at Robinson, Illinois, in 1884. The father was a democrat until the war, and then joined his allegiance with the republican party. The only public office he ever held was that of tax collector. He was an active member of the Christian or Disciples Church. Several members of the family have attained distinction. Judge Sims’ sister...

Sims, Leonard – Obituary

Truck Kills Sims, Former Powderite Leonard Sims, 60, who farmed the place now occupied by Ben Biais on Clover Creek, some years ago, died Wednesday from a broken neck suffered when a truck he was operating went over a bank near Elkton on the Reedsport highway last Sunday morning. Sims was taken to the Pacific Christian hospital in Eugene after the accident, and clung to life for two days. Sims left here about ten years ago, when Ben Biais took possession of the Clover Creek ranch. He had farmed the place for two years, according to William Hudelson, North Powder pioneer merchant. He was married when he was here, and is believed to have been a native of Grant county. North Powder News – Oregon Trail Weekly Friday April 17, 1931 Transcribed by Charlotte...

Victims of the Fugitive Slave Law – Fugitive Slave Law

The remainder of this Tract will be devoted to a record, as complete as circumstances enable us to make, of the Victims Of The Fugitive Slave Law. It is a terrible record, which the people of this country should never allow to sleep in oblivion, until the disgraceful and bloody system of Slavery is swept from our land, and with it, all Compromise Bills, all Constitutional Guarantees to Slavery, all Fugitive Slave Laws. The established and accredited newspapers of the day, without reference to party distinctions, are the authorities relied upon in making up this record, and the dates being given with each case, the reader is enabled to verify the same, and the few particulars which the compass of the Tract allows to be given with each. With all the effort which has been made to secure a good degree of completeness and exactness, the present record must of necessity be an imperfect one, and fall short of exhibiting all the enormities of the Act in question. James Hamlet, of New York, September, 1850, was the first victim. He was surrendered by United States Commissioner Gardiner to the agent of one Mary Brown, of Baltimore, who claimed him as her slave. He was taken to Baltimore. An effort was immediately made to purchase his freedom, and in the existing state of the public feeling, the sum demanded by his mistress, $800, was quickly raised. Hamlet was brought back to New York with great rejoicings. Near Bedford, Penn., October 1. Ten fugitives, from Virginia, were attacked in Pennsylvania—, one mortally wounded, another dangerously. Next morning, both were captured. Five...

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