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Biographical Sketch of Horace E. H. Ruggles

The task of educating children of one of the peninsula’s most flourishing cities is the responsibility that falls on Horace E. H. Ruggles, supervising principal of the Burlingame schools. It was not long ago that Burlingame although destined to become one of the county’s leading cities, did not have a single school house within its boundaries. It was shortly after that Mr. Ruggles accepted his present position. With 217 children the Burlingame system was founded. In only three years the number of pupils increased to nearly 500. Burlingame has two handsome, modern, up-to-date school houses of which any community would be justly proud. A recognized feature of the Burlingame school system is the perfect co-operation between the teachers. To bring this about was one of Mr. Ruggles’ first undertakings; and succeeding in that he is now encouraging a closer relationship between the schoolroom and the home through the mutual efforts of the parents and teachers. Mr. Ruggles came to Burlingame well prepared for the responsibilities of his position. After a splendid primary and preparatory school education he attended the Potsdam Normal School in New York. After holding several teaching positions he became principal of the high school at Johnsonburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Ruggles is a native of Vermont. He has lived in California for five...

Biography of William B. Ruggles

WILLIAM B. RUGGLES WILLIAM Benjamin Ruggles was born at Bath, Steuben County, N. Y., on the 14th of May, 1827. He is the son of William and Mary Ruggles. At the age of thirteen he was in a Bath printing office, trying to work his way up from the printer’s case, with the determination of becoming some day an educated man. At the same period he attended a part of the time the public school of Bath, with a view of preparing himself for a collegiate course. ” We remember him,” writes one, ” when a boy, as a studious youth, and call to mind the hours when we found him stretched out evenings on the old ‘ bank ‘ of the printing office studying his books by the aid of a tallow dip, fitting himself for entrance to Hamilton college.” In 1846 he had the great satisfaction of entering Hamilton college, in the sophomore class, though still obliged during vacation to set type in order to secure the necessary funds to carry him through college. He went through, graduating in 1849, with the highest honors of his class. And we venture to say that no graduate ever left the halls of that excellent institution of learning with more scholarly pride and satisfaction than did young Ruggles with his diploma in hand. While he had experienced the truth that there is “no royal road to learning,” he had also found that his industry and perseverance had overcome all obstacles in the way; and he stepped out into the world ready for its more active and stirring duties – an...

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