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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Norwich Soldiers in War with Mexico

Names of soldiers from Norwich Vermont in the War with Mexico T. B. Ransom, Colonel 9th United States Infantry. Killed at Chapultepec, September 13, 1847. Henry O. Brigham, Drummer 9th United States Infantry. Died at Detroit, Mich. James Crangle, Hudson Kimball, Oramell Chamberlain, Ezekiel V. Hatch, George Hatch, Rowell, Elijah Hatch. Died at Tunbridge, Vt. Frederick K. Spear. Died at West Point, N....

Old Norfolk County Massachusetts Records

May 17, 1654, Jno Ward of Haverhill and wife Alice conveyed to Elizabeth Lilford of Haverhill (wife of Tho: Lilford) 4-acre house lot. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Rich: Ormsby. Ack. before Tho: Wiggin May 15, 1658. April 22, 1659, Robert Swan of Haverhill and wife Elizabeth, for £r6, conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 6 acres of houselot I bought of Mathias Button, bounded by Theophilus Satchwell, etc. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Symon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. Oct. 12, 1661, Obadiah Eyer (his mark) of Haverhill and wife Hannah, for £5 l0s., conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 4 acres in flaggy meadow, bounded by Edward Clarke and Jno Eyer. Wit Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Simon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. April 21, 1659, William Simons (also Simmons) (his M mark) of Haverhill and wife Elizabeth, for £8 10s., conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 3 acres of houselot I bought of Theophilus Satchwell, bounded by Daniel Ladd, etc. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Simon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. April 19, 1661, James Davis, sr., (his mark) and wife Cisley (her mark) of Haverhill, for £10, conveyed to George Brown of Haverhill 2 acres of my houselot on the side next grantee’s houselot. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Symon Bradstreet Oct. 17, 1661. Thomas Barnet (signed Barnerd; also spelled Barnard) of Salisbury, husbandman, conveyed to Richard Currier of Salisbury, planter, 24 acres of upland in Salisbury new town, bounded by John Eyer, sr., now in possession of grantee, widow Willix (formerly wife of Tho: Hauxworth) and Merrimack...

Biography of Charles S. Rowell

Charles S. Rowell, a farmer and the Postmaster of West Hopkinton, was born June 26, 1857, in the house which he now occupies, son of Isaac and Harriet (Adams) Rowell. This farm was owned by his great-grandfather, who settled here shortly after the Revolutionary War, probably about 1780, and was the birthplace of his grandfather, Moses Rowell, who was born November 29, 1776. Moses lived on the farm both during his father’s lifetime and after his death, when he became its owner. At one time he owned some mills; but after a while he sold them, devoting himself exclusively to the farm. On November 26, 1801, he married Tamesin Eastman, who had eight children-Abram, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Abram, Isaac, Albert G., Achsa, and Roxana. Abram died at the age of seven years, Albert at the age of five, and Achsa in infancy. Isaac Rowell, born April 19, 1813, remained on the farm with his father until he was sixteen years of age. Then he learned the carpenter’s trade, which he afterward followed until his marriage, on which occasion he returned to the farm. He made several additions to the farm, which contained in his time about three hundred acres of land. In 1840, February 20, he married Harriet R. Adams, a daughter of James and Lydia Johnson Adams, of Henniker. They had five children, namely: James A. and Harriet Ella, who died in infancy; Harriet Ella (second), who on October 24, 1866, married Frank Howlett, of Bradford; Mary E., who married June 9, 1874, George Gove, of Henniker; and Charles S., the subject of this sketch. Mr. Howlett died June...

Slave Narrative of Julia Woodberry

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Julia Woodberry Date of Interview: November 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina “Oh, my God a mercy, child, dat been a time when dat shake come here. I tell you, dat been somethin. I sho remember all bout dat cause I been a grown woman de year dat earthquake come here. Yes, mam, I gwine tell it to you just like I experience it. We had all just been get over wid us supper en little things dat night en I had washed Auntie en Mr. Rowell’s feet for dem to lie down en dere come such a sketch of clouds from over in dat direction dat I never know what to make of it. Auntie en Mr. Rowell never know what to make of it neither. I remember, I run out to help my sister dat been out to de paddlin block en, honey, you ain’ never live to see no black cloud like dat been. I washed a piece through en den I left off en went back in de house en set down by de fire to dry my feet. I set dere awhile en seems like somethin just speak right out de fire, bout dat time, en tell me to move my feet dat I was in bad shape. En, child, it de truth of mercy, dere come a big clog of dirt out dat chimney en drap (drop) right down in de spot whe’ my foot was. I run to Auntie en Mr. Rowell to see could dey tell what dat was, but dey been in just as much...

Slave Narrative of Julia Woodberry

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Julia Woodberry Date of Interview: November 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina “No, mam, I ain’ thought bout nothin no more to tell you. Death been in de family en seems like I just been so worried up wid my daughter sick in de house dere wid de straw fever. De doctor, he say it de fever en dat all we know, but it acts like de straw fever all up en down. I tell dem chillun dere de other night dat I would have to go back en get my mind fixed up wid somethin to speak bout fore you come here another time. Yes, mam, have to get my mind together somewhe’ or another.” “I been born down dere in Britton’s Neck, but most my days was lived up to Mr. Jim Brown’s place to Centenary. My father, he was name Friday Woodberry en my mother, she come from off de sea beach in slavery time, so she told me. Say dat her old Massa stole her en her brother John, too, from off de sea beach. When freedom come here, her brother John went back to de sea beach, but my mother say dat she won’ in no shape to go back. She went from family to family till after freedom was declared en her white folks wouldn’ never have her ill-treated neither en wouldn’ never let nobody else have her no time. When she was let loose from de white people, she went to Britton’s Neck wid a colored woman. You see, she was a stranger to de country bout...

Biographical Sketch of C. F. Rowell

C. F. Rowell, born in Goshen, N. H., came to Keene in 1851, and worked as a carriage painter, in the employ of French Bros., twenty-one years. He traversed the entire state of New Hampshire as correspondent for the New Hampshire Patriot, at which occupation he spent three years. He was station agent for Connecticut River & Ashuelot R. R., from June 1877, until June 1884, and since then has been agent for the recovery of lost freight on the Cheshire R. R. He was sergeant-at-arms of the New Hampshire house, under J. A. Weston, and has been twice Democratic candidate for state treasurer. He was a member of the Keene board of education for six years. He married Evaline Dodge, in 1855, and has two daughters, Jennie M. and Nellie...

Slave Narrative of Jessie Rowell

Person Interviewed: Jessie Rowell Location: Dade County, Florida Jessie Rowell, 331 NW 19th St., Miami, Florida was born in Mississippi, between Fossburg and Heidelberg, on the Gaddis plantation. “My grandmother worked in the house, but my mother worked in the field hoeing or picking cotton or whatever there was to do. I was too little to work. “All that I can ‘member is, that I was just a little tot running ’round, and I would always watch for my mother to come home. I was always glad to see her, for the day was long and I knew she’d cook something for me to eat. I can ‘member dat es good as ’twas yestiday. “We ‘stayed on’ after Freedom. Mother was give wages then, but I don’t know how...

Biographical Sketch of Hon. Charles Rowell

HON. CHARLES ROWELL, son of Lemuel Rowell, removed from “Ryder Corner” to Allenstown, N. H., where he died Jan. 11, 1867, aged 82 years. He was intrusted with many civil offices. He was Selectman of his town twentyfour years, Justice of the Peace about the same number of years, a Representative to the State Legislature four years, County Treasurer two years, and State Senator two years. He had been an earnest and consistent member of the Methodist E. Church for fifty-eight years. EDMUND ROWELL, a brother of the preceding, studied medicine and settled in Merrimac County, where he died young. FRANKLIN ROWELL, and CHRISTOPHER ROWELL, sons of David Rowell, both men of decided genius – are among the most successful artists in Boston. EDMUND ROWELL, Son of Sherburn Rowell, is a successful trader at New London,...
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