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1921 Farmers Directory of Audubon Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; (), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allexander, David. Wf. Clara; ch. Alice, Frank and Mable. Anita, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 33. Isabell Duthie. Alt, Wm. Ch. Ruth, Raymond and Marie. P. O. Exira, R. 4. O. 50 ac., sec. 7; O. 275 ac., sec. 8 (8.) Anderson Bros. P. O. Adair, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 12;O. 40 ac., sec. 1. (45.) Owners, G. A. Anderson and Andrew Anderson. Anderson., Chris. Wf. Alvilda; ch.Nels and Elsie. P. O. Exira, R. 4. O. 161.51 ac., sec. 31. (13.) Anderson, I. S. Wf. Amanda; ch. Annabelle. P. O. Exira, R. 4. R. 160 ac., sec. 17. (11.) Owner, W. Wolf. Bain, Geo. Wf. Elizabeth; ch. Christina, Leonard, Helen, Archie, Hattie and Robert. P. O. Anita,R. 3. O. 40 ac., sec. 26; O. 40 ac., sec. 35. (41.) Owners, Geo. and Elizabeth Bain. Bain, Robert P. Wf. Etta; ch. Zoe, Fannie and George. P. O. Anita, R. 3. O. 120 ac., sec. 25.(35.) Baier, Wm. J. Wf. Edna; ch. Bertha, Wm., Lester and Fred. P. O. Exira, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 4;R. 80 ac., sec. 3, and in Greeley Twp., O. 80 ac., sec. 33. (38.) Owner, John M. Dimick. Baker, Alfred. Wf. Luella; ch. Hannah. P. O. Exira, R. 3. R. 120 ac., sec. 4. (27.) Owner, John H. Baker. Baker Bros. P. O. Exira, R. 3. R. 120 ac., sec. 4. Owner, John H. Baker. Bartalsen, J. C. Wf.Moley; ch. Wesley, Willis and Ruth. P.O. Exira, R. 4. R. 120 ac., sec. 9.(5.)Owners, Tillie...

Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Québec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

Slave Narrative of Tena White

Interviewer: Martha S. Pickney Person Interviewed: Tena White Location: Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina Everybody in the town of Mt. Pleasant, Christ Church Parish (across the Bay from Charleston) knows “Tena White, the washer,” “Tena, the cook,” “Maum Tena” or “Da Tena, the nurse”—the same individual, accomplished in each art, but best as a nurse. The house where Tena lives is the second in a row of Negro houses. The writer, calling from the gate, was answered by Tena, a middle-sized woman of neat figure. As the writer ascended the steps a friendly cur wagged itself forward and was promptly reproved by Tena, who placed a chair, the seat of which she wiped carefully with her dress. The piazza was clean and on the floor a black baby slept on a folded cloth, with a pillow under its head. The writer was soon on friendly terms with Maum Tena, and was told: “As soon as my eye set on you, I see you favor the people I know. My people belonged to Mr. William Venning. The plantation was Remley Point. I couldn’t zactly member my pa’s name. I member when de war come though. Oh dem drum; I nebber hear such a drum in my life! De people like music; dey didn’t care nothing bout de Yankees, but dem bands of music! My mother name Molly Williams. My pa dead long before that. All my people dead. I stayin’ here with my youngest sister chile—youngest son. He got seven head ob chillun.” “I can do anything—wash or cook—aint no more cook though. Oh yes” and her eyes sparkled, “I know...

Biography of Walter Robson

Walter Robson, a former representative of Pottawatomie County in the Legislature, is a man of large and important business interests in and around Westmoreland. His chief business is farming, but whether as a farmer, legislator, merchant he had played a forceful and virile part in every one of his numerous interests. Reared in Kansas from early infancy, Mr. Robson was born at Wilmington in Will County, Illinois, February 26, 1875. His father, John Robson, is and for many years had been a prominent factor in Pottawatomie County and is still living on his farm two miles northeast of Westmoreland. He possesses the characteristic qualities of the Scotchman. He was born at Hawick, Scotland, in 1838, grew up and learned the trade of stone mason in his native country and married there Miss Eliza Scott, who was born in Hawick in 1839. In 1867 they came to the United States and for a number of years John Robson followed the contracting and building business at Wilmington, Illinois. In November, 1877, he brought his family to Kansas and then bought the farm two miles northeast of Westmoreland where he still resided. His business interests have constantly grown and he is now owner of 700 acres of rich farming land in Pottawatomie County, owned and built in 1901 the Robson Building on Main Street in Westmoreland and had a three-quarter section of land in Lipscomb County, Texas, in the Panhandle near Higgins. Politieally he is an independent democrat and served as county commissioner three years. For the past ten years he had been president of the Farmers State Bank of Westmoreland. He...

Biographical Sketch of William N. Robson

William N., son of John Robson, was born in the town of Seneca. New York, in 1822, on the homestead farm. This later passed into his possession and he was engaged in its cultivation until his death. He married Katherine J. Smith, who is still (1910) living on the old...

Biography of Edward B. Robson

Edward B., son of William N. and Katherine J. (Smith) Robson, was born in the town of Seneca, Ontario county, New York, November 19, 1867. He received the advantages of an excellent business and classical education. At first he was a pupil in the district school. then at the Canandaigua Academy and the Geneva High School, and finally received his business training at Eastman’s Business College, from which institution he was graduated in 1891. During his early years, while he was still a student, his spare time was employed in assisting his father in the cultivation of the homestead farm, and he thus gained a detailed and practical knowledge of all pertaining to general agriculture. His first position in commercial life was with the Adams Express Company. in Geneva, with whom he remained for a short time, resigning to accept a position as bookkeeper with the hardware firm of T. J. & 1. M. Skilton, which position he held for a period of seven years, and until he started in business for himself. About 1899 he established himself in the agricultural implement business, a branch of commerce with which he was thoroughly well acquainted, and of this he made an immediate success. He keeps in stock a large and varied assortment of every tool and implement in use in the cultivation of the soil, and the branches of work connected with it. his annual sales averaging at the present time twenty thousand dollars, and they are steadily and constantly increasing. The business is conducted on the most modern and approved lines, and fully equipped with everything which will draw...

Biographical Sketch of James A. Robson

James A. Robson has honored his town no less than himself by being appointed to several of the highest legal offices in the state. He is the son of John and Isabella (Telfer) Robson, and was born in Gorham, Ontario county, New York, January 1, 1851. He attended the district school of Gorham until 1865, when he was a student for one year at the Haveling high school, at Bath, New York, and the Canandaigua Academy in 1867-68. He then matriculated at Yale University, from which he was graduated in 1873 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and then took up his legal studies in the Law School of Columbia University, New York City, being graduated from that institution in 1876 with the degree of Bachelor of Law. He immediately established himself in the practice of his profession in Canandaigua, and was successfully engaged in it until 1903, when he was appointed justice of the Supreme Court of New York for the Seventh District filling the vacancy occasioned by the death of the Hon. William H. Adams. In 1904 Mr. Robson was elected for a full term, which will expire December 31, 1918. January 8, 1907. he was appointed associate justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He has always supported Republican...

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