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Biography of Samuel Richardson, M.D.

Among the old “land marks” in the medical profession, in the county of Waterloo, is Dr. Samuel Richardson, forty years a practitioner in Galt. He is better known than almost any other man in the town, having been up and down the valley of the Grand river for a long period, a distance of twenty or thirty miles, and at an early day, much farther; and even now, with all the comparatively new settlers, there are very few families in a radius of ten or fifteen miles, that do not know the Doctor. He is a native of the county of Longford, Ireland, and was born February 3, 1809, his parents being Euchmuty and Jane (Moffatt) Richardson. He was educated at a clergyman’s school and Trinity, Dublin; there studied medicine; and was graduated from the Royal College of Surgeons in that city, in 1834. In the autumn of the same year he embarked for the western world to follow his profession in Upper Canada, locating first at Guelph, and there practicing for five years. Many of his rides at this date were not only long, but extremely tedious. In 1839 the Doctor removed to Galt, then a small village; and in forty years has seen the country settle up with thrifty farmers, and Galt become a manufacturing town of perhaps 5000 inhabitants. Other doctors had preceded him, or soon followed him hither, but they have gone, some to other parts of the country, one, a pioneer, Dr. Robert Miller, back to England, and others to “that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns.” Dr. Richardson has been in...

Biography of William Benjamin Richardson

William Benjamin Richardson was born October 31, 1867. He was the son of Dr. Stephen Lawrence Richardson, prominent physician and surgeon, and Susan Radford Richardson, of Twiggs County. Early in life he was bereft of parents and was forced to seek a livelihood for himself. With his blithe courage and rugged determination he used the obstacles he encountered as opportunities to succeed. He united with Mount Calvary Baptist Church at Cary, Ga., and was called to serve as deacon soon thereafter, and was active in this work until he moved away. A lover of the simple and natural things of life, he chose farming as his chief occupation. On February 17, 1889, he was married to Miss Faith Davis, daughter of Henry Davis, Confederate veteran, and Caroline Davis, of Twiggs County. They moved to the upper part of Pulaski County, ten miles from Cochran, which is now Bleckley County. Here they reared a large family of eleven children: H. G., W. B., E. 0., C. L., S. L., Mrs. J. F. Lee, Mrs. Nell Wade, Mrs. J. P. Pollock, Mrs. G. M. Grinstead, Mrs. J. P. McGriff, Jr., Emmie, who died in childhood, and twenty-two grandchildren. In 1909 he began his political career, being elected tax receiver of Pulaski County. He held this office for six years. In the spring of 1910 he moved to Hawkinsville and accepted a position with the Thompson Oil Mill Company; however, he retained his residence on the farm. In 1920 he was elected tax collector, and has served in this office until the present time. In every movement concerning the advancement of county...

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Samuel A. Richardson

Dr. Samuel A. Richardson was born in Dublin, N. H. He graduated at the Albany Medical college, remained in a hospital one year, and came to Marlboro, July 5, 1855. He remained in practice here until 1862, when he went out with the lath N. H. Vols., and remained in the service until the close of the war. At the time of the surrender of Lee, at Appomatox, the doctor furnished the lunch partaken of by the vanquished and victorious commanders. With this refreshment he managed to furnish some liquor, which he said they drank in silence and with bowed heads. Dr. Richardson died June 19,...

Biographical Sketch of Nelson Richardson

Nelson Richardson was born in Hinsdale, February 13, 1817. His educational advantages were limited, but by careful study and reading he has acquired a good business education- At the early age of eighteen years he began to assist in the navigation of the Connecticut, and in 1841 was made captain of a flat-boat, continuing in that capacity until the close of 1847, when the railroad was completed, and the river navigation abandoned. About two years later he purchased a farm in the northern part of the town, upon which he has resided until the present time. He has the confidence of his townsmen, and has served them repeatedly as selectman, and is frequently called upon to act as executor and administrator in settling...

Biographical Sketch of Abijah Richardson

Abijah Richardson, a native of Woburn, Mass., and a soldier in the Revolutionary war, was the first settler upon the farm on road 19, where Luke F. and Malachi Richardson now reside. He married Elizabeth Richardson and reared seven children, two of whom are living. His son Malachi married Tamesin, daughter of Aaron and Mary (Townsend) Greenwood, and reared a family of seven children, four of whom are now living. He still resides on the homestead farm, where five old people are living, aged respectively eighty-eight, eighty-six, eighty-six, seventy-nine and seventy-five...

Biography of Silas Richardson

Silas Richardson, a descendant of John Richardson who came from England previous to 1636, was born in Medfield, Mass., 1748, married, in 1771, Sileme Daniels, of Medway, Mass. In 1776 he came to Chesterfield and settled on land one mile north of the Factory Village. The deed of his purchase under colonial government, still preserved, is dated in May, 1776. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and was called “Lieutenant” Richardson was one of the original trustees of the academy, selectman in 1788, ’93 an ’96, and died in 1803. His children were: Wilkes, born December, 1772 married Mehitabel Clark, resided in Chesterfield till 1808, when he remove to Champion, N. Y. He was selectman in 1804, ’05. Sarah, born September, 1779, married Calvin White, of Westmoreland. Orlo, son of Silas, m Tied Nancy, daughter of Benjamin Wild, who died April 4, 1872, aged near ninety years. He lived in Chesterfield all his life, was a justice of the peace and an active business man, was selectman in 1826, ’28, ’34 and ’35, representative in, 1828, ’29, and died May 27, 1852. His children were, John Milton, born November 25, 1807. Laura, born January 25, 1809, married Ebenezer Culver, of Barre, N. Y., and died March 28, 1861; Nancy, born September 20, 1810, died December 1, 1857; Edwin, born August 2 1812, married Sarah B. Wheeler, of Westmoreland, was a manufacturer scythes in Fitchburg, Mass., the most of his life; Sarah Wild, born August 11, 1814, married Col. Charles Butterfield, of Westmoreland, who was graduate of Kimball Union academy, and a prominent teacher; Silas D., born December 20,...

Biography of Clement Richardson

Clement Richardson, of Jefferson City, president of the Lincoln Institute, deserves mention as an eminent educator, for his professional work has been not merely instilling knowledge into the minds of pupils but has been broad in its scope, thoughtful in its purposes and human in its tendency. lie has studied the individual and his requirement, has met the needs of the school and has made valuable contributions to literature that has to do with his profession. Mr. Richardson was born June 23. 1878, in Halifax county, Virginia, a son of Leonard and Louise (Barksdale) Richardson. In his youthful days he attended the White Oak Grove country school, but his opportunity to pursue his studies was limited to a brief period each year, as it was necessary that he work in the tobacco fields. He was still quite a young lad when obliged to leave school in Virginia, and later he became mail carrier for the Brow Hill plantation near Paces station. In 1895, however, prompted thereto by a laudable ambition, he made his way to Massachusetts seeking work and with a view to promoting his education. After spending some years in Winchester, Massachusetts, working in a tannery, a glue factory and on a farm, through the help of the Young Men’s Christian Association and the First Baptist church of Winchester, he was able to enter the Dwight L. Moody Mount Herman school for boys. It was in the fall of 1897 that he entered Mount Herman, there pursuing a classical course, working all the time to pay his way, doing cooking and farm work and thus meeting his expenses....

Biography of Elias A. Richardson

ELIAS A. RICHARDSON. The self-made man is entitled to respect, and he gets it in America. He represents all that is vigorous and substantial in our American institutions, and is deserving of all praise. Elias A. Richardson is a native of Henderson County, West Tennessee, where he was born in 1851, a son of William and Mary E. (Seaton) Richardson, who became residents of Independence County, Arkansas, in 1853, but later came to Stone County, and here the father breathed his last October 10, 1892, in his sixty-eighth year. The mother is still living and resides on the old home farm in Franklin Township. They were members of the Missionary Baptist Church for years, and he was a Democrat in politics, and by occupation was a farmer, in which calling he met with success. Of eleven children born to them, the subject of this sketch was the fourth, and nine are now living. The subject of this sketch came to Stone County with his parents in 1855, and here has since resided. His education was acquired in Independence County, and later in Stone Country, and upon reaching the age of eighteen years he commenced to do for himself as a tiller of the soil. He rented some river bottom land in Franklin Township, afterward followed the same occupation in Sharpe County, and then for some time was a resident of Franklin County, Arkansas He then returned to Franklin Township, Stone County, and after eight years settled on the farm of 360 acres which he now owns. This land is highly productive, and on the 125 acres that are under...

Biography of Alonzo L. Richardson

Thirty-eight years have passed since Alonzo L. Richardson came to Idaho, then a sparsely populated territory of the extreme northwest, its splendid resources undeveloped, its advancement a development of the future. For many years he has been closely identified with the work of progress, and is now filling the position of clerk of the United States court in Boise. A native of Missouri, Mr. Richardson was born in Franklin County that state, on The 19th of December 1841, and is a representative of one of the old families of Virginia. His ancestors located there in 1750, and there occurred the birth of Daniel Richardson, the great grand father of our subject. He removed from the Old Dominion to Kentucky and subsequently to Missouri, being a pioneer of those states. The father of our subject also bore the name of Daniel Richardson and was a native of Kentucky. He married Dorcas Caldwell, a native of Missouri, and in 1843 started with his family to cross the plains to Oregon, being in the second emigration to that far distant territory. Gold had not then been discovered in California, and the tide of emigration had not set toward the Pacific coast. The hardships and dangers of such an undertaking were many, and to add to the difficulties the father was taken ill and died at Fort Hall, Idaho, then a Hudson Bay station, when only thirty years of age. Mrs. Richardson continued on her way to her destination, and some time after her arrival in Oregon City she married Sidney W. Moss, now one of the oldest living pioneers of that place....
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