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Clifford Family of New Bedford, MA

Among the most prominent law offices in southern Massachusetts is one which by lineal succession has existed for nearly, if not quite, a hundred years, and in which three generations of the Clifford family have been represented. The members of the Clifford family who have been such important factors in this old and prominent law firm came of a distinguished ancestry. The late John H. Clifford was a direct descendant in the eighth generation from George Clifford, who came with his wife Elizabeth and son John from Arnold village and parish, Nottinghamshire, England, to Boston in 1644.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twentieth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Bangor, Maine, to the eleventh day of May, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

Choctaw Indian Mounds

I read the following in the American Antiquarian over the signature of H. F. Buckner: “Mr. Maxwell, in a historical address, says: My conviction is that the high grade of military skill displayed by the Mound Builders at Carthage, Alabama, attests a know ledge of the necessities of attack and defense unknown to the mode of warfare practiced by the tribes found here by De Soto.” Mr. Maxwell does not state in what respect the high grade of military engineering skill displayed by the Mound Builders at Carthage, Alabama, attests a knowledge of the necessities of attack and defense unknown to the mode of warfare practiced by the tribes found here by De Soto. However, I will here state that the old Shakchih Humma fort, within the enclosure of which was established the missionary station among the Choctaws, called Hebron, of which I have already spoken, and where I spent many years of my life, displayed as “high grade of military engineering skill” and attested a “knowledge of the necessities of attack and defense” equal to our high grade of military engineering skill displayed in the military forts erected throughout the present Indian Territory, of which I have had an ocular demonstration. “Who the Mound Builders were it is impossible to determine,” continues Mr. Maxwell. “They were not built by the ancestors of the tribes found here by De Soto, as they pretended no knowledge of their construction, traditional or otherwise.” Truly, a poor basis upon which to predicate the above broad assertion; since De Soto expedition was made alone for the purpose of finding gold, while to learn...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biographical Sketch of Capt. Eldad Prescott

Capt. Eldad Prescott, son of Benjamin, was a native of this town, and the first settler upon the farm on road 39 corner of 40. His son Oren married three times, first, Martha L., daughter of Jacob and Martha Adams, of Rindge; second, Caroline A., daughter of William T. Nutting; and third, Louisa J. Plummer, of Goffstown, who bore him five children. His son Elliot 0. married Lizzie A., daughter of Julius A. and Eliza Hale, of Rindge, and resides upon a farm on road...

Biography of John Henry Prescott

John Henry Prescott. At the close of the Civil war, in which he had played a gallant role as a Union soldier and had attained the rank of captain, Mr. Prescott came out to Kansas and from that time until his death on July 5, 1891, was a notable figure in the life and affairs of Salina and that part of the state. He attained high rank as a lawyer and as a jurist, and was also remarkably successful in business affairs. His name and memory may well be cherished by his descendants and by the people of the entire state. Captain Prescott was born October 14, 1840, at Pittsfield, New Hampshire. He is of old New England stock, and this branch of the Prescott family goes back in American history to the year 1640. His parents were substantial farming people, John and Mary (Clark) Prescott, both natives of New Hampshire. John Henry Prescott was the second in a family of five children and the oldest of the three sons. His early life was spent on his father’s farm, and he completed his literary education at Pittefield Academy. When sixteen years of age he took up the study of law. He was still equipping himself for this profession when the Civil war broke out. On August 10, 1862, Mr. Prescott enlisted as a private in Company F of the Twelfth New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. He was almost immediately assigned to duty as commissary sergeant, and on the basis of merit and fidelity to duty was promoted through one grade after another until he became captain of Company I of...

Biography of George W. Prescott

George W. Prescott, of San Bernardino, Master Mechanic of the Southern California Railroad, and one of the most expert mechanical engineers in this country, was born in New Hampshire fifty-one years ago. At the early age of seven years he was left without father or mother, and at thirteen he left his native State and started out to fight the battle of life alone and unaided. Going west as far as Ohio, he spent the next-five years in the old city of Chillicothe, where, following the natural bent of his mind, he studied the business of machinist, and when just past his eighteenth birthday he took charge of a locomotive engine. In 1856 he went to Columbus, Kentucky, and commenced building the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. On January 15, 1857, he unloaded from the steamer J. C. Swan the first locomotive engine that ever passed over that road, and set it up and run it aver the line. He put up all the engines and cars for that road till the spring of 1861. On May 3, of that year, the war of the Rebellion having broken out, and Mr. Prescott New England blood and patriotism allying him to the cause of the Union, he resigned his position and went North, notwithstanding he was offered $500 a month by the Superintendent of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad if he would remain and take charge of the machinery of the line. On June 15, of that year, he began to run an engine on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, and was connected with that company in various capacities...

Biography of Charles H. Prescott

CHARLES H. PRESCOTT. – The subject of this sketch is second vice-president of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on the 22d of June, 1839, and is the son of Harrison and Sarah Harris Prescott. His father was a native of Massachusetts, and can date back for three generations as members of New England families. Harrison Prescott died when his son was yet in infancy; and at the age of six he suffered the loss of his mother. So under the care of guardians he was educated in the common and high schools of Boston. At the age of fifteen he found employment as clerk in the well-known shipping firm of Wilkingram Bros & Co., who had offices in nearly every part of the country, and who shipped lumber from Puget Sound as early as 1854. He remained in the employ of that firm until March of 1861, when he began to do for himself, and went to Australia, where he engaged in mining and sheep raising with good success. After spending seven years in Australia, by exposure in the mines his health failed; and in 1868 he visited London, England, for a short time. He then returned to his native city, and in 1869 went to Kansas City in the employ of James T. Joy as auditor and treasurer of the Missouri, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad. From that time until 1880, Kansas City was his home; and probably no one man did more for that country than Mr. Prescott. In 1880 he was elected comptroller of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company under...

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