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Descendants of Richard Kimball of Ipswich MA

KIMBALL. Richard Kimball, of the parish of Rattlesden, County of Suffolk, England, with his family, came to New England in the ship “Elizabeth” in 1634, arriving at Boston, and thence went to Watertown, Mass. He soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement, was proclaimed a freeman in 1635, and was proprietor in 1636-37. Soon thereafter he removed to Ipswich, where he passed the remainder of his life. His services as a wheelwright were very much appreciated. Mr. Kimball married Ursula, daughter of Henry Scott, of Rattlesden, and (second) Oct. 25, 1661, Mrs. Margaret Dow, of Hampton, N. H. He died June 22, 1675. His widow died March 1, 1676. His children, all by the first marriage, and all born in England except the youngest child, were: Abigail, Henry, Elizabeth, Richard, Mary, Martha, John, Thomas and Sarah. Richard Kimball (2), son of Richard, was born in Rattlesden, England, about 1623. He came to New England with his parents. He removed from Ipswich to Wenham, near Ladd’s Hill, in the western part of the town, and became a large land owner. He was a subscriber to the minister’s rate in 1657; Dec. 4, 1660, he was on the committee to see about building the new meetinghouse, and in 1663 was on the committee to join with the select-men to put out the new contract. With the exception of three years he served on the board of selectmen from 1658 to 1674. He owned 200 acres of land in Rowley. He died in 1676. He seemed to have served in the Indian war. His second wife was Mary...

Descendants of Francis Brayton of Fall River, MA

BRAYTON. The first in America by this name, one Francis Brayton, came from England to Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where, in 1643, he was received as an inhabitant, in 1655, became a freeman, and to him nearly if not all the Braytons of New England trace their origin. He early entered into the political life of the country, serving as a member of the General Court of Commissioners for the Colony, for many years as member of the Rhode Island General Assembly, and frequently during the later generations his descendants have held positions of responsibility and trust in the public offices of State and the private offices of the business world. The name is found on the rolls of the United States Army and Navy, and on the professional records of the clergy, the physician, and the lawyer. This article, however, is confined to one of the branches of the family several of whose members chose the commercial world for their sphere and through which, during the phenomenal growth of Fall River’s industrial life, the name of Brayton became prominent and influential. In 1714, Preserved Brayton, grandson of Francis, purchased 138 acres of land from William Little, whose father was one of the proprietors of the ShawomeOKt Purchase in Swanzey, Massachusetts. This farm, since known as the Brayton Homestead, borders on the west bank of the Taunton river and is located in the present town of Somerset, which, in 1790, was set apart from Swanzey (now spelled Swansea). Preserved had already married Content Coggeshall, the granddaughter of John Coggeshall, whose name is handed down in history as that of a...

Staples Family of Taunton, MA

STAPLES (Taunton family). The Staples name is one of long and honorable standing in New England and the country. The family has been a continuous one in the Bay State for two hundred and seventy and more years, and at Taunton, in this Commonwealth, have lived generation after generation of the name down to the present – a worthy race, one representative of the best type of citizenship. Such men in more recent generations as the two Sylvanus Staples, father and son, and the latter’s son Sylvanus Nelson Staples, and the two Ebenezer Staples and Abiel B. Staples – all in line – have played well their part in the affairs of their communities in their day and generation. The Taunton Staples spring from the ancient Weymouth family of the name, from John Staple (the common spelling both in England and America at that period omitting the final “s”), who appears on the records of that town, it is said, in 1636. His wife’s name is given as Rebecca by the late Joseph W. Potter, of Bangor, Maine. John Staple became a freeman of the Colony May 10, 1648. He died July 4, 1683, in Dorchester, leaving according to his will, children John, Jr., of Braintree, Joseph of Taunton, Abraham of Mendon, Rebecca, wife of Samuel Sumner of Dorchester, and Sarah, wife of Increase Sumner, also of Dorchester. John Staple’s son Abraham was a proprietor of Mendon. He married in 1660 Mary, daughter of Robert Randall, of Weymouth, was a weaver by trade, served in King Philip’s war, and was known – probably from service in the militia –...

Expeditions of Fowler and James to Santa Fe, 1821

When Pike returned from his western expedition and related his experiences in Santa Fe and other places among the Spaniards, his accounts excited great interest in the east, which resulted in further exploits. In 1812, an expedition was undertaken1 by Robert McKnight, James Baird, Samuel Chambers, Peter Baum, Benjamin Shrive, Alfred Allen, Michael McDonald, William Mines, and Thomas Cook, all citizens of Missouri Territory; they were arrested by the Spaniards, charged with being in Spanish territory without a passport, and thrown into the calabazos of Chihuahua, where they were kept for nine years. In 1821, two of them escaped, and coming down Canadian and Arkansas rivers met Hugh Glenn, owner of a trading house at the mouth of the Verdigris, and told him of the wonders of Santa Fe. Inspired by the accounts of these travelers, Glenn engaged in an enterprise with Major Jacob Fowler and Captain Pryor for an expedition from the Verdigris to Santa Fe.2 The members of the McKnight party who had escaped from the Spaniards, continued their journey to Saint Louis, where they repeated their romantic tale to John McKnight, a brother of Robert McKnight who was still a prisoner with the Spaniards, and to others. As a result of their account, McKnight and General Thomas James organized an expedition to go from Saint Louis to Santa Fe. James’s purpose was to trade with the Indians, and John McKnight went to see his brother and procure his release, if possible. The two expeditions got under way the same summer, and both went by way of the Arkansas as high as the Verdigris, which at that...

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Mary F., emp. H. S. & H., h. 16 East Main View the Complete Directory Surnames in the Town of Lakeville Massachusetts You will find the directory of Lakeville Massachusetts starts on page 161. Aldrich, Allen, Anderson, Ashley, Audet, Barnes, Barney, Barton, Bassett, Bennett, Benton, Best, Boman, Briggs, Brown, Bullock, Bump, Bumpus, Burgess, Canedy, Card, Carlin, Caswell, Chace, Clark, Clarke, Cole, Collins, Coombs, Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Dean, DeMoranville, Dexter, Drake, Dushane, Ellers, Elmer, Elwell, Farmer, Farnham, Ford, Frades, Freeman, Frost, Gerrish, Gifford, Gilman, Gilpatrick, Godfrey, Grady, Griffith, Hackett, Hafford, Hale, Hall, Hammond, Harlow, Harrington, Harvey, Haskell, Haskins, Hayes, Haynes, Hinds, Hinkley, Hoard, Hoffman, Holloway, Horr, Horton, Morton, Howland, Johnson, Jones, Keith, Kelley, Kenney, Kinsley, Lang, Leach, Leonard, Letcher, Lincoln, Loner, Luther, Macomber, Mann, Manning, Marrah, McCulby, McDonald, McGowan, Moody, Morgan, Mosher, Murphy, Nelson, Nickerson, Norris, Orrall, Osborne, Parker, Parkhurst, Parris, Parry, Paun, Peirce, Perry, Phinney, Pickens, Pierce, Pittsley, Plummer, porter, Pratt, Quell, Ramsdell, Reed, Reynolds, Robbins, Robinson, Rogers, Russell, Sampson, Sanford, Sawyer, Scott, Seekell, Sharidan, Shaw, Shockley, Shove,...
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