Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Descendants of John Sanford of Taunton, MA

The town of Taunton, which included within its original boundaries the neighboring village of Berkley, has been the home of a branch of the Sanford family for about two hundred years. This Berkley-Taunton branch of the family, in the line of Capt. Joseph Sanford, an active patriot of the Revolution, has been more or less eminent in professional life. Four of the sons of Capt. Joseph Sanford were college graduates and ministers of the gospel; and several of their posterity have followed the learned professions. One of the grandsons of Capt. Joseph was the late Hon. John Elliott Sanford, of Taunton, lawyer, legislator, railroad commissioner, etc., who at the time of his death was characterized by the local paper as Taunton’s “first citizen.”

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the first Theodore, b. in Boston in 1636, m. Sarah Myrick, Apr. 27, 1664, and lived on the side of the “Upper Green,” in Newburyport, Mass. His son, John Atkinson, m. Sarah Woodman, in 1693, and had Thomas, b. Mar. 16, 1694, who m. Mary Pike, of Salisbury, Aug. 5, 17 19. He was the father of: Humphrey Atkinson, b. June 12, 1720; m. Sarah Hale, of Newburyport, May 25, 1743, and lived in that town until 1760, when he came to Buxton. He had purchased land in the township previously; was a shipwright. He d. in 1775, and with his wife was buried at Pleasant Point. Children named as follows, being born in Newbury: Sarah Atkinson, b. June 25, 1744; m. Jabez Bradbury. Joseph Atkinson, b. Aug. 24, 1745; m. Olive, dau. of Capt. Joseph Woodman, Dec. 18, 1767, and in 1769 his father conveyed to him forty acres of land, upon which he settled and died. He was deacon of the Baptist church. He and his brother m....

Biography of Hon. Robert P. Henry

The son of a Revolutionary soldier and the representative of a distinguished family was Robert P. Henry. He was born in 1788 in Scott County, Ky., where his father, Gen. William Henry, had settled among the first in that region. He graduated in Transylvania University at Lexington, and studied law with Henry Clay. In 1809 he was admitted to the bar, and the same year was appointed Commonwealth’s Attorney for the district. He served in the war of 1812 as aid to his father, with the rank of Major. In 1811 he married Miss Gabriella F. Pitts, of Georgetown, Ky., and some years after the close of the war of 1812 he removed to Christian County, where he continued to reside to the end of his life. Soon after he came to Hopkinsville he was appointed Commonwealth’s Attorney, a position he filled with ability. He was elected to Congress from this district in 1823, and re-elected in 1825. As a member of the Committee on “Roads and Canals ” was instrumental in obtaining the first appropriation ever granted for the improvement of the Mississippi River. While in Congress he was appointed a Judge of the Court of Appeals, an honor he declined. He died suddenly before the close of his second congressional term, and before he had hardly reached the prime of life. As a lawyer, Mr. Henry was positive in his positions when taken. He rapidly gained a practice, which steadily increased until he entered the political field. He was a good pleader, and his address to a jury was always clear, logical and often eloquent. His mental...

Biography of Edward P. Pitts, M. D.

Edward P. Pitts, M. D.,is a well known specialist at Atchison, where he had practiced as an eye, ear, nose and throat physician and surgeon for fifteen years. He is a native of Virginia and his ancestry for several generations lived in that part of the South. He was born in Northampton County, Virginia, October 13, 1880. This branch of the Pitts family came out of England and settled in Maryland in Colonial times. Doctor Pitts’ grandfather, Edward P. Pitts, was born in Somerset County, Maryland, in 1821, and became a prominent lawyer. He lived at Norfolk, Virginia, where he died in 1881, and for about thirty years had been judge of the Circuit Court. Doctor Pitts’ father, Edward D. Pitts, was also a prominent lawyer. He was born in Northampton County in 1849, was reared and married there, and graduated in law from the University of Virginia. For a time he practiced at Eastville in Northampton County, but subsequently took up practice at Norfolk, where he was active in his profession until his death in 1909. In early manhood he served as clerk of the court at Eastville. He was a democrat, a member of the Episcopal Church, and was affiliated with the Masonic order. Edward D. Pitts married Emory W. West, who was born in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1850 and is now living at Norfolk in that state. Her children were: Mary, wife of Frank K. Clements, a hotel proprietor at Petersburg, Virginia; Charles D., in the plumbing business at Norfolk; Doctor Pitts; Mrs. Mildred Rogers, whose husband had charge of the branch of the Morris...

Biography of Roy Pitts

Roy Pitts is chief of the fire department at Independence. During his two years in that office he has developed the service to a high point of efficiency, partly by organization and partly by the introduction of modern apparatus, so that Independence today can boast of as perfect an equipment for fighting fire as any city of its size in Kansas. When Mr. Pitts took charge of the department the apparatus consisted of a chief’s car and a horse-drawn hose wagon. Since then he has taken the lead in giving the city a better apparatus. The city now has three motor propelled cars, one pump and hose car and the other a hose car, and both of these engines were designed by Chief Pitts. The first was built by the South Bend Motor Car Works at South Bend, Indiana. It is in itself a complete engine for prompt and efficient fire fighting. It carries 1,200 feet of hose, besides ladders, deluge, searchlight and all necessary tools, and can pump 750 gallons a minute. The other hose car, also designed by Mr. Pitts, was built by himself and the other firemen of the city on a Buick chassis. It carries an equipment of 1,000 feet of hose, ladders, chemicals, pyreenes, searchlight, etc. The chief’s car, which was built by the Anderson Fire Coupling and Supply Company of Kansas City, Kansas, also carries a large amount of fire fighting equipment, including two forty-gallon chemicals, one hand chemical, two pyreenes, etc. When he first took charge of the chief’s office Mr. Pitts was called upon with his horse-drawn equipment to fight two...

Biography of James Albert Pitts

James Albert Pitts, a prominent figure, in real estate and loan circles in Muskogee, having developed a business of very substantial proportions, was born in Hickory county, Missouri, in 1877, and is a son of Robert Virgil and Pauline C. (Robertson) Pitts. The father was a merchant in Missouri and in 1889 removed to Muskogee, where he engaged in the live stock business. He continued a resident of this city until his demise, which occurred in 1900. James A. Pitts, who is usually called “Bert” by his warmest friends, was educated in the public schools, in the Harrell Institute at Muskogee, Oklahoma, and in the Bacone College. Starting out in the business world he was for five years connected with the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, in the clerical department. He then resigned his position and for two years was connected with the hotel business. Later he was appointed chief clerk in the tax collector’s office and occupied that position for a year, after which he was elected to the office of city assessor and continued to serve in that capacity for two years. Later he was appointed city tax collector and, after retiring from that position served for one year as superintendent of the city water works. He has thus given much time to public service and in every connection has faithfully discharged the duties that have devolved upon him. After retiring from the superintendence of the water works he acted as assistant to Jake Hamon, chairman of the state republican central committee, for a period of two years. In 1907, following the admission of Oklahoma to the...

Robert Lee Pitts

Corpl., Co. C, 81st Div., 324th Regt.; of Nash County; son of J. H. and Mrs. Florence V. Pitts. Entered service May 25, 1918, at Spring Hope. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C., then to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 5, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne, St. Die, Vosges Mtn. Sector. Returned to USA June 18, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 28,...

Pin It on Pinterest