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Claybank Cemetery Ozark Alabama

Margaret Claybank Cemetery is located about two miles from Ozark, Alabama on Ozark – Daleville Highway. This cemetery enumeration was performed in 1948 by Eustus Hayes and as such will provide details on headstones which may no longer be present in the cemetery. Lizzie E. Dowling June 25, 1853 – Oct 31, 1938. Wife of N. B. Dowling. N. B. Dowling Aug 15, 1853 – Mar 28, 1938. Hus of Lizzie E. Dowling. Leila Belle Dowling May 26, 1876 – Jan 14, 1933. Dau of S. L. & Sarah Jane Dowling. Samuel L. Dowling Nov 3, 1841 – Jan 15, 1919. Sarah Jane Windham Feb 22, 1839 – June 15, 1925. Wife of Samuel L. Dowling. Rev. John Dowling July 20, 1818 – Feb 28, 1900. Son of Rev. Dempsey Dowling. Charlotte Dowling Oct 20, 1888 -. Wife of Rev. John Dowling Sr. Erin Elizabeth Dowling Feb 10, 1902 – Sep 11, 1902 Inf. Dau of R.Y. & Melissa Dowling. Pauline Dowling Feb 13, 1897 June 24, 1899 Inf. Dau of RY & Melissa Dowling. Alonzo G. Dowling Dec 26, 1888 June 16, 1922. F. Melissa Prigden July 1, 1866 Apr 18, 1943. Wife of R.Y. Dowling. Robert Y. Dowling June 14, 1865 Aug 30, 1924. J. B. Dowling July 16, 1903 Oct 20, 1928. Sarah E. Thomas Feb 23, 1839 – Sep 10, 1917. Wife of F.M. Prigden. F.M. Prigden Apr 10, 1838 – Feb 21, 1908. Jefferson Dowling May 6, 1848 – Mar 12, 1887. Margaret Dowling Oct 7, 1850 – Aug 16, 1887. Wife of Jefferson Dowling. Nellie Parker July 16, 1855 – Nov 2, 1887....

Slave Narrative of Bert Mayfield

Interviewer: Eliza Ison Person Interviewed: Bert Mayfield Location: Lancaster, Kentucky Place of Birth: Garrard County KY Date of Birth: May 29, 1852 Garrard County. Ex-Slave Stories. (Eliza Ison) Interview with Bert Mayfield: Bert Mayfield was born in Garrard County, May 29, 1852, two miles south of Bryantsville on Smith Stone’s place. His father and mother were Ped and Matilda Stone Mayfield, who were slaves of Smith Stone who came from Virginia. His brothers were John, Harrison, Jerry, and Laurence, who died at an early age. He lived on a large plantation with a large old farm house, built of logs and weatherboards, painted white. There were four rooms on the first floor, and there were also finished rooms on the second floor. An attic contained most of the clothes needed for the slaves. “Uncle Bert” in his own language says, “On Christmas each of us stood in line to get our clothes; we were measured with a string which was made by a cobbler. The material had been woben by the slaves in a plantation shop. The flax and hemp were raised on the plantation. The younger slaves had to “swingle it” with a wooden instrument, somewhat like a sword, about two feet long, and called a swingler. The hemp was hackled by the older slaves. The hackle was an instrument made of iron teeth, about four inches long, one-half inch apart and set in a wooden plank one and one-half feet long, which was set on a heavy bench. The hemp stalks were laid on these benches and hackled herds were then pulled through and heaped in piles...

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