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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Biography of Capt. Edmond D. Pennington

CAPT. EDMOND D. PENNINGTON. This gentleman has resided in the community in which he now lives for the past ten years. He was born in White County, Tennessee, January 26, 1825, a son of John and Nancy (Harris) Pennington the former of whom was born in Virginia, a son of Charles Pennington, a native of England, who married after reaching America, a German lady. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and at an early day became a resident of Tennessee, and later of Illinois, in which State he passed from life, having followed the calling of a Baptist minister while living. John Pennington was a farmer and died in Tennessee in 1863, his wife having passed from life in 1847. Of a family of fifteen children born to them, only four are living: Dabner, Nancy, Edmond D. and Rachel. Edmond D. Pennington grew to manhood in the State of his birth and there enlisted in the Union Army in August, 1862, with which he served until May, 1865, in the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry. He took part in the battles of Stone River and was in various other engagements and skirmishes. He was a good and faithful soldier and was promoted in January, 1863, to the rank of first lieutenant and later to that of captain of Company B, of the First Tennessee Mounted Infantry, which he commanded at Cherry Creek and Beech Grove. After the war he located in White County, Tennessee, where he followed farming until 1869, when he emigrated to Kansas and for fourteen years resided in Montgomery County, Kan. He then came to Douglas County,...

Slave Narrative of Lizzie Barnett

Interviewer: Mrs. Rosa B. Ingram Person Interviewed: Lizzie Barnett Location: Conway, Arkansas Age: 100? “Yes; I was born a slave. My old mammy was a slave before me. She was owned by my old Miss, Fanny Pennington, of Nashville, Tennessee. I was born on a plantation near there. She is dead now. I shore did love Miss Fanny. “Did you have any brothers and sisters, Aunt Liz.?” “Why, law yes, honey, my mammy and Miss Fanny raised dey chillun together. Three each, and we was jes’ like brothers and sisters, all played in de same yard. No, we did not eat together. Dey sot us niggers out in de yard to eat, but many a night I’se slept with Miss Fanny. “Mr. Pennington up and took de old-time consumption. Dey calls it T.B. now. My mammy nursed him and took it from him and died before Mr. Abe Lincoln ever sot her free. “I have seen hard times, Miss, I shore have. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now “In dem days when a man owned a plantation and had children and they liked any of the little slave niggers, they were issued out to ’em just like a horse or cow. “‘Member, honey, when de old-time war happened between...

Pennington, Roy – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Roy Pennington, 71, of La Grande, died June 26 at his home. A graveside service will begin at 1 p.m. Friday at the Island City Cemetery. Roy was born April 21, 1936, the son of Wesley Lawrence and Katie Pennington in La Grande. He graduated from La Grande High School in 1954. On April 27, 1956, he married Jane Duncan in Elgin. He worked for Boise Cascade until 1959. He was a union carpenter, working for Bechtel Brothers, Gilco and later for Gus Tsiatsos until retiring in 2000. Roy had a great love of the outdoors, including hunting, fishing, mushrooming and gardening. He loved going into the mountains and enjoyed spending time with his family and friends. Survivors include his wife, Jane Pennington of La Grande; son, Dale and his wife, April, Pennington of La Grande; daughter, Sandy Knudson of Baker City; four grandchildren; sisters, Ruth Roulet of Elgin and Mildred Hayes of Enterprise; sister-in-law, Wanda Pennington of La Grande; numerous nieces and nephews and other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his brothers, Walter and Lawrence Pennington. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Oregon Lung Association in care of Daniels Chapel of the Valley, 1502 7th Street, La Grande 97850. La Grande Observer – Obituaries For The Week Ending June 30, 2007 Published: June 30, 2007 Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO...

Pennington, Pearl – Obituary

Miss Pearl Pennington, daughter of Sheriff and Mrs. C.C.Pennington, died in the Baker City hospital last Saturday, following an operation for appendicitis. Deceased was a young lady of bright mental attainments and her parents have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in their said bereavement. A Card of Thanks In this our time of trouble, we take this method of thanking our many friends fortheir assistance and the sympathy shown us during the sickness and burial of our daughter and sister, Pearl. Mrs. and Mrs. C.C. Pennington, Brother and Sisters Elgin Recorder Friday August 28,...

The Fugitive Blacksmith

The Fugitive Blacksmith: Events in the history of James W. C. Pennington, Pastor of a Presbyterian Church, New York, formerly a slave in the State of Maryland, United States. The principal portion of the ‘Tract,’ as Mr. Pennington modestly styles his book, consists of an autobiography of his early life as a slave, and of his escape from bondage, and final settlement in New York as a Presbyterian Minister. His adventures and hair breadth escapes invest the narrative with startling interest, and excite the deepest sympathies of the reader.

Biography of James Pennington

James Pennington, familiarly known as “Old Pennington,” was also one of the pioneers of Arizona. The Pennington family consisted of James Pennington, his wife and five children, three daughters and two sons. They moved from Tennessee into Texas, and from thence pushed westward through New Mexico into Arizona and settled upon the Sonoita near Fort Buchanan in the year 1857 or 1858. During the time of the abandonment of the country by the Americans “he occupied,” says Ross Browne, “a small cabin three miles above the Calabasas, surrounded by roving bands of hostile Indians. He stubbornly refused to leave the country; said he had as much right to it as the infernal Indians, and would live there in spite of all the devils out of the lower regions. His cattle were stolen, his corrals burned down, his fields devastated; yet he stood it out to the last. At times when hard pressed for food, he would go out in the hills for deer, which he packed in on his back at the risk of his life.” Frequently, in his absence, his daughters stood guard with guns in their hands, to keep off the Indians who besieged the premises. About this time, Miss Lucera S. Pennington, was married to a Mr. Paige, and was living with her husband in a canyon where she was captured by a roving band of Indians, together with a little girl about ten years of age, said to be a Mexican, and who it is said, afterwards became the wife of the late Charles A. Shibell of Tucson. Mrs. Paige, not being able to keep...

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