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Jackson Family of Fall River, MA

Here in this article it is the purpose to treat of but one branch or family of the Massachusetts Jacksons – the family of John Jackson, who was a descendant of the Middleboro settler of the name, one John Jackson, and who in time removed to the State of Maine, the home State for several generations of the Fall River Jacksons in question. The first John Jackson came from England to New England and settled in Middleboro, where in May, 1714, he was married to Mary Smith. They had two children (if not more), John and Cornelius, the latter of whom was born in Middleboro Sept. 11, 1716. The father died in 1731.

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence. The community loyalty and neighborly spirit that typifies this locality is our legacy from these early pioneers. Their sweat and toil made possible many luxuries that we of Washington County now enjoy. Their ambition and foresight resulted in far flung civic improvements that are of lasting benefit. SurnameGiven NameMiddle Name/TitleAddressCame FromDate Arrived AdamEffieMrs.WeiserIowaJuly, 1879 AdamsFrancisCambridgeCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsRichardJWeiserCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsVereWeiserNative1890 AdamsonRosaMidvaleKansas1884 AderBerthaMrs.MidvaleAugust, 1881 AderArthurWeiserMissouri1884 AllenClaudeMrs.Weiser1889 AllisonAlexBCambridgeNative1875 AndersonErnmaO. / Mrs.WeiserSweden1887 ApplegateWilliamWeiserOregon1878 BartonBarbaraS. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1882 BartonCarrieMrs.Weiser1882 BartonMollieWeiserNative1885 BeierAmeliaMrs.WeiserUtah1882 BlackDoraMrs.WeiserMontana1888 BoydLillianHague / Mrs.MidvaleNative1881 BradshawWalterWeiserIllinois1884 BranchBS. / Mrs.MidvaleNative BrooksArthurSWeiserNative1873 BuhlThomasCambridge1869 CalwhiteMaeSalingWeiserNative1883 CalwhiteMartinWeiserGermanySept. 1887 CanaryLizzieMrs.WeiserMontana1881 CarpbbellLenaWeiserNative1882 CarrickBertCambridgeKansas1882 ConnellMaryMrs.WeiserIndiana1880 CopeBenWeiserNative1882 CorbettJRWeiserNative1883 CornettOllieJones / Mrs.MidvaleNative1879 CornettIsaacWMidvaleOregon1882 CousensWJWeiserSept. 1882 CowinsLewisWeiserCalifornia1887 CoxAliceMrs.Cambridge1881 CrowellLoraCravenWeiserNative1880 DalyCarrieM. / MrsWeiserOregonApril 1884 DaytonMaryWeiserJerusalem, Idaho1878 DevennyGeoMrs.WeiserNative1884 DickersonL.M. / MrsWeiserBoise1869 DickersonLMWeiserKansas1877 DodgeMaybelleBrooksWeiserNative1868 DonartGeorgeWeiserNative1890 EcclesWilliamHCambridge1886 EdlinLauraWilsonWeiserIllinois1886 ElliottAndrewWeiserOregon1887 EshomEmmaF. / Mrs.WeiserKansas1875 EvansDudleyMidvaleAugust, 1881 EvansJohnMidvaleNative1882 FavreLouisMidvaleOregon1889 GallowayFrancisHWeiserNative1871 GallowayAFWeiserNative1877 GallowayGuyWeiserNative1880 GallowayKatherineWeiserNative1882 GilderoyGeorgeWeiserIllinoisJuly, 1871 GilderoyNA. / AllieWeiserNative1875 GilderoyMaryMrs.WeiserOregon1878 GlascockGeorgeWeiserNative1882 GrayClaraE. / Mrs.WeiserOregonSpring, 1872 GrayThomasWWeiserNativeJuly, 1882 GrimmettWilliamWeiserOregon1883 HagueGeorgeWeiserNative1888 HarrisFrankJudgeWeiserCalifornia1880 HarrisNettieO. / Mrs.WeiserOklahoma1881 HauntzHJWeiserMissouriJuly, 1882 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserUtah1880 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserNative1881 HixonCL. / Dr.WeiserKansas1882 HoffstatterMaryCambridgeNebraska1879 HopkinsLeeAWeiserOhio1889 HopkinsVernonJWeiser1889 HopperRA. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1876 HopperJohnMMidvaleAugust, 1883 HubbardJW. / Mrs.WeiserSept. 1882 HubbardCoraAWeiserIllinois1882 HubbardJWWeiserOregon1886 JacksonAlexWeiserMissouri1890 JonesMaryMrs.Native1872 JonesIda.WeiserKansas1875 JonesAJWeiserMissouri1878 KeithleySAMidvale1876 KeithleySA. / Mrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySarahMrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySeppie.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithlyEffieMrs.Midvale1881 KimballSallieR. / Mrs.WeiserNative1877 KiserCharlesAWeiserColorado1881 KorupFranz.WeiserGermany1888 LaffertyZellaMrs.WeiserNative1884 LanningRebecca.WeiserKansas1891 LedingtonCalvin.MidvaleKansas1883 LedingtonCal.MidvaleKansas1883 LinderMinnieMrsMidvaleUtah1870 LinderThosMMidvaleColoradoSept. 1875 LinderRoseMidvale1877 LinderRoseGrosecloseMidvale1877 MadisonDave.Weiser1880 MartinDoraKelly / Mrs.WeiserNative1876...

Slave Narrative of Rosa Starke

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Rosa Starke Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Date of Birth: 1854 Age: 83 Occupation: Farm work, hoeing and picking cotton. Rosa’s grandfather was a slave of Solicitor Starke. Although she has had two husbands since slavery, she has thrown their names into the discard and goes by the name of Rosa Starke. She lives in a three-room frame house with her son, John Harrison, two miles south of Winnsboro, S.C., on the plantation of Mrs. Rebecca V. Woodward. She still does farm work, hoeing and picking cotton. “They say I was six years old when de war commence poppin’ in Charleston. Mammy and pappy say dat I was born on de Graham place, one of de nineteen plantations of my old marster, Nick Peay, in 1854. My pappy was name Bob and my mammy name Salina. They had b’longed to old Marse Tom Starke befo’ old Marse Nick bought them. My brudders was name Bob and John. I had a sister name Carrie. They was all older than me. “My marster, Nick Peay, had nineteen places, wid a overseer and slave quarters on every place. Folks dat knows will tell you, dis day, dat them nineteen plantations, in all, was twenty-seven thousand acres. He had a thousand slaves, more or less, too many to take a census of. Befo’ de numerator git ’round, some more would be born or bought, and de nominator had to be sent ’round by Marse Nick, so old Miss Martha, our mistress, say. Her never could know just how many ’twas. Folks used to come to see her and...

Slave Narrative of Reverend Squire Dowd

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Rev. Squire Dowd Location: 202 Battle Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: April 3, 1855 [HW: language not negro, very senternous & interesting.] [TR: The above comment is crossed out.] Reverend Squire Dowd 202 Battle Street Raleigh, N. C. My name is Squire Dowd, and I was born April 3, 1855. My mother’s name was Jennie Dowd. My father’s name was Elias Kennedy. My mother died in Georgia at the age of 70, and my father died in Moore County at the age of 82. I attended his funeral. My sister and her husband had carried my mother to Georgia, when my sister’s husband went there to work in turpentine. My mother’s husband was dead. She had married a man named Stewart. You could hardly keep up with your father during slavery time. It was a hard thing to do. There were few legal marriages. When a young man from one plantation courted a young girl on the plantation, the master married them, sometimes hardly knowing what he was saying. My master was General W. D. Dowd. He lived three miles from Carthage, in Moore County, North Carolina. He owned fifty slaves. The conditions were good. I had only ten years’ experience, but it was a good experience. No man is fool enough to buy slaves to kill. I have never known a real slave owner to abuse his slaves. The abuse was done by patterollers and overseers. I have a conservative view of slavery. I taught school for four years and I have been in the ministry fifty years. I was...

Biography of Richmond Pearson

Richmond Pearson, late of Davie county when a part of Rowan, was born in Dinwiddie county, Va., in 1770, and at the age of nineteen years came to North Carolina and settled in the forks of the Yadkin river. When the war of the Revolution broke out he was a Lieutenant in Captain Bryan’s company (afterward the celebrated Colonel Bryan, of Tory memory). After the Declaration of Independence, at the first muster which occurred, he requested some on whom he could rely to load their guns. When Captain Bryan came on the ground he ordered all the men into ranks. Pearson refused, and tendered his commission to Bryan, whereupon he ordered him under arrest. This was resisted, and he was told that the men had their guns loaded. They then came to a parley, and it was agreed by the crowd, as matters stood, that Bryan and Pearson, on a fixed day, should settle this national affair by a fair “fist fight”, and whichever whipped, the company should belong to the side of the conqueror, whether Whig or Tory. At the appointed time and place the parties met, and the Lieutenant proved to be the victor. From this time the Fork company was for liberty, and Bryan’s crowd, on Dutchman’s creek, were Loyalists. The anecdote illustrates by what slight circumstances events of this period were affected. When Cornwallis came south, Pearson, with his company, endeavored to harass his advance. He was present at Cowan’s Ford on the 1st of February, 1781, where General Davidson fell in attempting to resist the passage of the British. Captain Pearson was a successful...

Biography of Daniel O. Pearson

DANIEL O. PEARSON. – One of the most respected and honored of all of Washington’s citizens is the pioneer of Stanwood whose face looks at us from the opposite page. He is one of those whose integrity and universal kindness, as well as public spirit and business enterprise, are of the truest need in laying the foundations of a community. Mr. Pearson was born at Lowell, Massachusetts, April 11, 1846. His parents were Daniel and Susan (Brown) Pearson, who now reside near Coupville, Washington. The first removal of the family was to Salmon Falls, while Daniel was yet an infant. There they remained till he was twelve years old. Returning to Lowell, they gave the son the best of educational advantages at the High School of that city. Having a collegiate education in hope, he was already well on in the preparatory course, when the tempest of the Civil war in 1861 called him, with so many of the other boys of the nation, to her defense. Mr. Pearson was one of the one-hundred day men, enlisting as a volunteer in Company G, Sixth Massachusetts Infantry. At the expiration of his term of service, he returned home and spent his time at the painter’s trade, which he had previously learned. Soon after the close of the war, Mercer’s Colony scheme, which created so much interest on this coast, and even in the East, come to the attention of the Pearson family, with the result that Daniel, with his mother and sister, joined the colony. The object of the colony was especially to enable those who had suffered in the...

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