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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Genealogy of the Yeargan Family 1730-1890

By the personal efforts of Leonidas Hilary Yeargan and Hilary H. L. Yeargan, two second cousins, who are great-grandsons of the original Rev. Andrew Yeargan, these memoirs have been obtained. The descent in this manuscript starts with Rev. Andrew Yeargan, who came from Wales about the year 1735 and settled in Virginia, ministering in the Roanoke and James River Valley. He married Ony Bowles and raised 10 sons and 1 daughter, namely: Andrew Yeargan, settled in South Carolina and raised two children, who’s identity is lost. John Yeargan,resided in Newbury County SC and raised two sons: John and Wiley. Samuel Yeargan,settled first in Newbury County SC and then Franklin County GA. Had at least one daughter, Sallie. Benjamin Yeargan, married Sarah Morgan, and had 4 children: Charlotte, Mark, Harriet and Bartlett. Would spell his name Yeargain. Jarratt F. Yeargan,married Amelia Patterson, and had 8 children: Benjamin, Patterson, Devereaux, Bartlett, Henry, Chesley, Charlotte and Sarah. Edward Yeargan, settled in Anderson County SC where he and his wife were killed by lightening. Raised a large family of children. James Yeargan,died a bachelor at his brother Devereaux’s house in Greenville County SC. Devereaux Yeargan, married and had the following sons: Andrew, Benjamin, Steven, Rufus and William. Bartlett Yeargan, married and had the following sons: Benjamin, William, Jarratt, Bartlett and Gideon. His descendants would spell their name as Yeargin. Williams Yeargan,married a Miss Bennett, and had the following sons: John, James, Philip and Bennett. His descendants lived in Illinois. Sarah Yeargan, married Burrell Hudson and raised a large family. Early in the 19th century finds Rev. Andrew and Ony Bowles in Greenville South...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

An Historical Sketch of the Seneca County Medical Society

At the anniversary meeting of the Seneca County Medical Society held at Waterloo, July 23, 1885, a resolution was introduced by Dr. S. R. Welles, and adopted by the Society, that a committee be appointed which should prepare biographical sketches of members of the Society from its earliest history to the present time. As a result, this manuscript was published which includes 75 biographies of the early pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society.

Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you want, click on the newsletter edition and then browse the pages until you find the specific biography you were looking for. This should help you find these wonderful biographies a little easier. SurnameGivenNewsletter Edition AckleyBenjaminSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleyJacobSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuel J.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 3 AlexanderWilliam H.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 2 AllenSilasSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 AlmySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 1 ArmstrongJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 1 BachmanJosephSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 1 BaileyEbenezerSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 4 BaileyGeorge & SamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeMahlonSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgePeterSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BaldwinJonas C.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 2 BangsAbnerSeneca County History...

Geographical Names of the Norwich VT Locality

Of the little settlements in the township of Norwich which seem to be existing in the sunset of their former glory, may be mentioned Beaver Meadow, or West Norwich. This place presents a notable instance of that decline in population and decay of business interests in a rural community, of which Vermont affords many examples since the advent of railroads and the fever of western emigration set in. For more than thirty years population, wealth, and enterprise have been drifting away from that section of the town. Probably the settlement reached the height of its prosperity previous to 1840. During the decade that preceded this date two churches were built here, a Baptist church in 1835, and Methodist church about two years later. Regular meetings were held, and full congregations gathered from the immediate neighborhood. Large families of children filled the schools, to the number of sixty pupils of a winter, sometimes. The village had for many years its well-stocked country store, and a variety of mechanics’ shops. Intelligent and thrifty farmers cultivated the productive farms. Before 1850 the exodus commenced. The Baptist society had its last settled minister in 1869, and a few years later, the church having become nearly extinct, the meeting house was taken down, and the lumber used to build a parsonage for the Baptist church in Sharon village. Four years earlier the Methodists had their last regular appointment from the Conference, though regular preachers were had some portion of the time much later. Many farms tilled forty years ago are wholly abandoned as homesteads, and others are in process of abandonment. It is impossible...

History of the Bridges Between Hanover NH and Norwich VT

The earliest form of transportation across the Connecticut River between Norwich and Hanover of which we have any information was the canoe of Nathan Messenger, who sometime in the summer of the year 1765 established a hunting camp near the bank of the river, a few rods south of where the west end of Hanover bridge now is. In this canoe the family and household goods of John Hutchinson were brought over from the Hanover side in the late fall of the same year, at the completion of their long journey from Ashford, Conn., to their new home. This family with that of Mr. Messenger, were the first white persons known to have passed the winter in Norwich, occupying together the log hut of Mr. Messenger. Jerome Hutchinson, a son of John, then a child of about three years, was fond in his old age of recounting his recollections of crossing the river on that occasion, some incidents of which never faded from his memory. The grotesque appearance in the water of an old white-faced cow (which the family had driven from Connecticut) as she swam behind the canoe during the passage of the river, was indelibly fixed in his mind. Mrs. Messenger, at her home on the Norwich side of the river, was first made aware of the arrival of the Hutchinsons by hearing the cry of their baby from the opposite bank, which she afterwards declared was “the sweetest music she ever heard, ”breaking thus unexpectedly the stillness of her solitary life in the woods. After the founding of Dartmouth College and the settlement of adjacent parts...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied themselves into the Connecticut at the northeastern part of the town. As he was inclined to engage in the settlement of the new town, the next year (June 7, 1763) his father transferred to him as ‘a token of his...

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