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Grinnell Family of New Bedford, MA

Since the early settlement of Newport and Portsmouth, R. I., shortly after 1638, the Grinnells have been identified with Rhode Island and Massachusetts history, the earlier generations living largely in the towns of Newport county, R. I., and for the past hundred and more years branches of this southern Rhode Island family have been representative of the best citizenship in the old Massachusetts town of New Bedford. At New Bedford lived Capt. Cornelius Grinnell, a patriot of the Revolution, and long engaged in the merchant service, who married into the old historic Howland family, and one of whose sons, Joseph Grinnell, for almost a decade represented the New Bedford district in the United States Congress, and was long prominent as a merchant and manufacturer and banker of the town; and there lived the late Lawrence Grinnell, father of the late Frederick Grinnell, who so long was at the head of the Providence Steam and Gas Pipe Company and the General Eire Extinguisher Company, a man of genius in mechanical lines, whose inventions gave him distinction, and one of whose sons, Russell Grinnell, is at this time vice president of the General Fire Extinguisher Company. It is with this New Bedford branch of the Grinnell family this article deals.

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report1 that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen, and accompanied by Major Long, topographical engineer, had left that city for the purpose of establishing a military post on the Arkansas near the Osage boundary. Major Stephen H. Long, at “Post of Ozark fifty miles up the Arkansas,” reported2 that he was ordered on a mission to the Forks of the Arkansas thence across country by land to Red River; thence to return by land to Saint Louis. “On the Arkansaw near the place where the Osage line strikes this river, I am to select a position for a military post to be under the command of Major Bradford, who is now at this place with his company, destined for that command. This business I am in hopes to accomplish by the first of December.” The point chosen by Long and Bradford for a military post was at the junction of the Poteau and Arkansas rivers called by the French, Belle Point, and after some years known as Fort Smith, after General Thomas A. Smith.3 On this expedition, Long ascended as high as the falls of the Verdigris, and made an observation of the longitude and latitude at...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Muster Roll of Captain Benjamin Beals’ Company

Muster Roll of Captain Benjamin Beals’ Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when mustered. Captain Benjamin Beals. Lieutenant Lora B. Stevens. Ensign Daniel Foss. Musicians George Austin. Leonard Griffin. Sergeants George Gould. John E. Sawyer David Wheeler, Ellas L. Lothrop. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Corporals Harrison Rose. Loren Parcher. Gustavus Gilbert. William Day. Privates Additon, Charles A. Bishop, Zadoc. Carver, Caleb. Caswell, Chandler. Caswell, Marcus. Clark, Amos, Jr. Coffin, James, Jr. Cummings, Jesse A. Day, Samuel B. Dunn, David T. Foss, Levi. George, George W. Gilbert, John N. Gilbert, Judson. Grover, John. Gould, Joseph. Harvey, Harrison. Hodgdon, Ebenezer. Mitchell, Jesse. Palmer, Manley. Pettengill, Jason. Ricker, Harris. Sedgely, Edward. Stetson, Benjamin F. Stetson, Nathaniel. Stubbs, Lorenzo D. Thoms, Peter...

Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the first Theodore, b. in Boston in 1636, m. Sarah Myrick, Apr. 27, 1664, and lived on the side of the “Upper Green,” in Newburyport, Mass. His son, John Atkinson, m. Sarah Woodman, in 1693, and had Thomas, b. Mar. 16, 1694, who m. Mary Pike, of Salisbury, Aug. 5, 17 19. He was the father of: Humphrey Atkinson, b. June 12, 1720; m. Sarah Hale, of Newburyport, May 25, 1743, and lived in that town until 1760, when he came to Buxton. He had purchased land in the township previously; was a shipwright. He d. in 1775, and with his wife was buried at Pleasant Point. Children named as follows, being born in Newbury: Sarah Atkinson, b. June 25, 1744; m. Jabez Bradbury. Joseph Atkinson, b. Aug. 24, 1745; m. Olive, dau. of Capt. Joseph Woodman, Dec. 18, 1767, and in 1769 his father conveyed to him forty acres of land, upon which he settled and died. He was deacon of the Baptist church. He and his brother m....

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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