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Biographical Sketch of Ferguson Owen

One of San Mateo County’s most efficient peace officers is Ferguson Owen, constable of the 2nd Township. As well as the important part Owen has played in the suppression of crime in his township, he has figured in many important criminal cases. One of the best known is the capture of Nick Greelish (James C. Greelish), the highwayman, who assaulted Mrs. L. Guggenheim in the Home of Peace Cemetery. While a thousand officers were in pursuit of this criminal, Constable Owen cleverly worked out his own set of clues and tracked him into a saloon on the state highway. Working single-handed Owen had Greelish handcuffed before the desperate criminal even realized that Owen was looking for him. Greelish is now serving a twenty-five year sentence for highway robbery. Three years ago Owen’s bravery saved the lives of a score of San Mateo citizens. A drink crazed Austrian was standing on a balcony on Main street shooting with a rifle at every passerby. Exposing himself to the fire of the maniac Owen took a dead aim at the man and shot him through the arm which held the gun. By trade Constable Owen is a painter but he has had to put aside the brush most of the time because of his arduous duties as constable. He was born in Virginia City, Nevada on July 25, 1875 and has lived in California 35 years, eight of which were spent in this county. He is a member of the Eagles, the Knights of Pythias and the Masonic...

Owen Family Records

Reliable authorities have the following to say regarding the name “OWEN; whence comes Bowen. “OWEN: a British personal name (a prince). Danish-Owen. French-Ouin. Domesday Book-Ouen. ” ‘Ap,’ the Welsh equivalent of our English `son,’ when it has come before a name beginning with a vowel, has in many instances become incorporated with it. Thus–`Ap-Owen’.” The Owen family has been prominent in the British Empire and in America, its members having played important roles in war and in peace. Family pride is a commendable trait and should be cultivated. All Owens have just cause to be proud of their family history and tradi­tions. The U. S. Marine Corps Headquarters at Washington reports that there were 103 Owens who served in the U. S. M. C. during the World War. The data in this volume is gathered from reliable sources. Those desiring further information are advised to consult volumes mentioned in list of references given in the back of this volume. The writer and his associates will be glad to give their cooperation to any members of the family who may be interested in having a complete genealogy of the family published. Unless otherwise plainly shown, the persons in this volume whose names are accompanied by three figures are sons or daughters of the immediately preceding persons bearing immediately preceding consecutive numbers. All persons in each group, bearing the same letter as a part of their respective numbers, are directly related. The generations of the descendants of those bearing numbers of three figures are represented as follows: Generations: 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th Symbols:(1), etc. (A),...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs.Thomas H. Owen

(See Grant) Louise Scott, daughter of James Orval and Mary E. (Davis) Hall, was born near Vinita, August 23, 1877. She was educated at Vinita and Harrell Institute, and is a graduate from the latter institution. She married November 2, 1898, Luman Franklin Parker, born August 23, 1872, in Phelps County, Missouri. He died Aug. 14, 1912. Mrs. Parker married Thos. H. Owen March 12 1916. They are residents of Oklahoma...

Slave Narrative of Cora Torian

Interviewer: Mamie Hanberry Person Interviewed: Cora Torian Location: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Place of Birth: Christian County KY Age: 71 Place of Residence: 217 W. 2nd St., Hopkinsville, KY Story of Cora Torian: (217 W. 2nd St., Hopkinsville, Ky.-Age 71.) Bell Childress, Cora’s Mother, was a slave of Andrew Owen. He purchased Belle Childress in the Purchase and brought her to Christian County. Cora was born in Christian County on Mr. Owen’s farm and considered herself three years old at the end of the Civil War. She told me as follows: “I has dreamed of fish and dat is a sure sign dat I would git a piece of money, an I always did. Dreamed of buggy and horse an it was a sign of death in family and I no’s hits tru. Dream of de ded hit always rains. My Mistus and Marster fed and clothed us good and we lived in a little log cabin of one room and cooked on an open fire. Some Marsters wud whoop ther slaves til the blood would run down daw backs dese slaves would run away sometimes den sum would come to Ise Marse and would have to send dem back to dar own marsters and how my ole marster hated to see dem go. “I hang horse shoes oer my door to keep the Evil Spirits away. My Mammy always wore and ole petticoat full gather at de waist band wid long pockets in dem and den to keep peace in de house she would turn de pocket wrong side out jes as she would go to somebodys elses house. “I...

Biography of Capt. C. C. Owen

CAPT. C. C. OWEN. The greater part of the life of Capt. C. C. Owen has been devoted to husbandry, but now, in the sixty-fifth year of his age, he is retired from that life, and is a notary public of Protem, Missouri. He was born in Barren County, Kentucky, in 1829, a son of George W. and Martha S. (Dickerson) Owen, natives of North Carolina and Kentucky, respectively, the birth of the former occurring in 1801 and that of the latter in 1805. George W. Owen was taken by his parents to Kentucky, and there he attained man’s estate and was married. In 1842 he came, by wagon, to Benton County, Missouri, the journey thither occupying one month. For ten years or more the father operated a tan yard in Benton County, and became a well-known man in that section. At the opening of the Civil War he enlisted in the Federal Army, but was soon rejected on account of his age. Up to the opening of the great conflict between the North and South, he was a Democrat, but he afterward became a stanch Republican. He became a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and held to that faith until his death in 1870, his widow surviving him until 1886. His father, John Holland Owen, was born in bonnie Scotland, but when quite young came with his parents and five brothers to America, and located in North Carolina, later in Virginia, and in 1802 in Kentucky, which region was then in a wild and unsettled condition. Here he passed the remainder of his life, dying about 1850....

Biography of John J. Owen

The history of the first things is always interesting. In any town the first settler’s is the name most carefully preserved. The places where he established his home and first worked at his primitive vocation are carefully noted, and his deeds and words are recounted often and with increasing interest as generations succeed one another. There lives in Genesee, Idaho, a man, now the postmaster of the city, who was its pioneer in more ways than one and it is the purpose of the biographer to record now a brief statement of the facts of his life and of his residence in the town with whose progress he has been so long and closely identified. John J. Owen is of English and Welsh ancestry and was born in Birmingham, England, January 30, 1843, a son of John and Matilda (Jordan) Owen. In 1849, when he was six years old, the family came to the United States. It consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Owen, John J. and two sisters. Charles, an older son, had been lost at sea. W. H., the youngest of the family, was born after the others came to this country and is now living in Minnesota. The family settled at Jacksonville, Illinois, where the elder Owen found work as a tinner, a trade which he had learned and at which he had been employed in England. Later the family lived successively in Mason county and in Iroquois county, Illinois: and there John Owen died at the age of seventy-seven, after having survived his wife several years. They had been reared in the Baptist faith, and later...

Biography of William Owen

William Owen. Much of the pioneer history of Kansas might be written around the names Owen and Packard. The late William Owen was one of the men who came from the East in the days of the ’50s for the purpose of assisting in the movement to make a free state out of Kansas. His father-in-law, Cyrus Packard, was also a prominent leader in the free state movement. Born in Rhode Island in 1827, William Owen came to Shawnee County, Kansas, in 1856, about the time the first territorial government was organized. As a young man in Rhode Island he learned and followed the trade of carpenter, and for a time was in the same vocation in Kansas. Later he conducted a sawmill, his being one of the first mills in the territory. He also was a merchant and kept a store at Rochester. After the war he was a farmer and carpenter, but in 1880 concentrated all his efforts upon farming and continued in that work for eighteen years, when he retired from business and moved to Topeka. Mrs. William Owen before her marriage was Olive Packard, and the Packard and Owen families lived close neighbors after coming to Kansas. Her father, Cyrus Packard, who was born in the State of Maine June 5, 1796, served as a soldier in the War of 1812. He was a man of deep religious convictions, an active supporter of the Congregational Church and carried his religious beliefs and his social principles into practical action on every occasion. At the time of the abolition movement in Maine Cyrus Packard and one other...

Biographical Sketch of Franklin Buchanan Owen

Owen, Franklin Buchanan; insurance; born, Talbot County, Md., Sept. 27, 1882; son of William Tilghman and Mary Tilghman Buchanan Owen; educated, public schools of Talbot County, Md., St. John’s College, Annapolis, Md., University of Maryland, School of Law, Baltimore, Md.; first lieut. Maryland National Guard; resigned in 1904; in November, 1897, entered the employ of Messrs. Lawford & McKim, general insurance agts. and brokers, of Baltimore; remained there until April, 1899; resigned to accept a position with the American Bonding Co. of Baltimore; was with that Company in various positions, until Dec. 31, 1906, resigning as sec’y and treas., to become mgr. of Baltimore branch of The American Surety Company of New York; resigned, and came to Cleveland, Jan. 31, 1909, and entered the employ of the late E. Shriver Reese, then gen. agt. of the Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland; member firm of Resse, Owen, Clark Agency, Suretyship and insurance; resident vice pres. Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland; member Society of Colonial Wars, Sons of American Revolution, and United Sons of Confederate Veterans; member Union, Tavern; Mayfield Country, Athletic, City and Church Clubs; member executive committee National Association of Casualty and Surety Agents; member executive committee Cleveland Board of Surety...

Marvin J. Owen

Private, 1st Class, Co. C, 28th Div., Reg. 303, Field Artillery. Son of W. E. and Alice L. Owen, of Davidson County. Entered service June 25, 1918, at Lexington, N.C.; was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C.; transferred to camp at Hill, Va.; sailed for France August 22, 1918; fought at Toul sector in November, 1918, and in the same month was on the offensive at Marchville, Privetville, Butgneville, Bois de Hartville; arrived in United States latter part of April and was mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., May 15,...

Biographical Sketch of C. E. Owen

C. E. Owen, a pioneer of 1849, residing on the corner of Olive and Eureka streets, Redlands, was born in Sheffield, Ohio. March 16, 1840, he left Ohio for California, shipping his horses and wagons to Chicago. At St. Joe, Missouri, he traded his horses for oxen. He left Iowa Point, May 10, 1849, with a company consisting of 100 wagons, and September 10 of the same year they arrived in the Sacramento valley with eighty-three wagons, under Captain Dorland. Mr. Owen can tell some interesting incidents of the journey across the plains, and of his experiences as a miner in the early days. For several years he engaged in buying and selling cattle and in the butcher business in Placer and Shasta counties. After this he again went to mining. In 1851 he went into the mercantile business at French Gulch, Shasta County, and lost heavily. He then went to the mines. After leaving the mines he followed the cattle business for twenty years, and at the end of that time went to farming in Napa valley, where he remained five years. In 1873 he came to San Bernardino County and purchased thirty acres of land on Base Line and A streets, which he improved and afterward sold, and purchased twenty-five acres in Redlands. Here he has a most beautiful orange orchard of fourteen acres, which is beginning to yield a handsome income, and here he expects to spend the rest of his days. He has been twice married, but has no children, except an adopted daughter, who is an artist and a teacher in the public...
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