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Descendants of Nathaniel Newcomb of Norton, MA

Mr. Newcomb was born April 12, 1797, of the sixth generation in descent from Francis Newcomb, who was born probably in Hertfordshire, England, about 1605, and came to America in the ship “Planter” in 1635, accompanied by his wife Rachel, then aged twenty, his daughter Rachel (aged two and a half years) and son John (aged nine months). After residing in Boston three years Francis Newcomb moved his little family to Braintree (now Quincy, Norfolk Co., Mass.), where he died May 27, 1692, his gravestone says “aged one hundred years.” Tradition says he came from Oxfordshire, England, and was of pure Saxon blood. He owned several tracts of land in Braintree. He had ten children.

Howland Family of Duxbury, MA

HOWLAND. Arthur and Henry Howland are believed to have come to America together and probably before 1625; they appeared in Plymouth Colony in the early days of its settlement. They were members of the Society of Friends and most of their descendants for many generations were, and many at the present time are, Friends. Arthur lived for a few years in Plymouth, then became a landholder and resident of Marshfield; while Henry, the progenitor of the Ancient Dartmouth Howland family, the branch here specially considered, lived at Duxbury. The first mention of him in New England is that made in the allotment of cattle to the different families in Plymouth in 1624. Perhaps none of the colonists have a better record for intelligence, thrift, uprightness and unmixed faith in the Divine One than Henry Howland, and these virtues have permeated the lives of his posterity. In general they are a family of great respectability, and as a people thrifty, economical and good managers of finance, most of them having a fair share of this world’s goods, some amassing millions. Henry Howland was made a freeman in 1633; was chosen constable for Duxbury in 1635; bought land there in 1640; was for some years surveyor of highways; served repeatedly on the grand jury, etc. He joined the Society of Friends, perhaps 1657, and was not a little persecuted thereafter on this account. In 1652, associated with others, he bought a large tract of land in Dartmouth; was one of the twenty-seven purchasers of what is now Freetown in 1659, and in the division of 1660 he received for his share...

Lincoln Family of Hingham and Taunton, Massachusetts

From the pioneer days at the settlement at Hingham and Taunton the Lincoln family has been a continuous one in that region of Massachusetts; one of prominence in the start, it has maintained itself both here and in the country at large and in both has long since become numerous. It has been claimed by the late Hon. Solomon Lincoln that all the Lincolns in Massachusetts are descendants of the Lincolns who settled in Hingham in 1636 and 1638. He says: “We have evidence of authentic records that the early settlers of Hingham of the name of Lincoln were four, bearing the name of Thomas, distinguished from each other by their occupations, as miller, weaver, cooper and husbandman; Stephen (brother of the husbandman); Daniel, and Samuel (brother of the weaver).” He adds “our claim is that the early settlers of Hingham above enumerated were the progenitors of all the Lincolns of the country. From Hingham the Lincolns trace their early home to Norfolk County, England.”

History of Cayuga County New York

This history of Cayuga County New York published in 1879, provides a look at the first 80 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. One value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Cayuga County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 90 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a regiment by regiment basis.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Frank Herrick Newland

Dr. Frank Herrick Newland, one of the rising young physicians of Clifton Springs, whose practice is an unusually large one for the time it has been in existence, is a son of Fred H. and Elivy (Crandall) Newland. Dr. Newland was born in East Bloomfield, New York, December 13, 1873. He attended the schools at Clifton Springs, Cook Academy at Montour Falls, New York, and Colgate University. He then became a student at the Homoeopathic Medical College, in Cleveland, Ohio, from which he was graduated in the class of 1902 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He immediately established himself in practice in July of that year at Clifton Springs, and has been very successful in his choice of a profession. His political affiliations are with the Republican party. His fraternal associations are with the following organizations : Sincerity Lodge, No. 200, Free and Accepted Masons, of Phelps; Newark Chapter, No. 117, Royal Arch Masons; Zenobia Conmmandery, No. 41, Knights Templar, of Palmyra, New York; Clifton Springs Lodge, Knights of Pythias. Dr. Newland married at Clifton Springs, January 19, 1904, Maud B., born in Clifton Springs, daughter of Frank and Sarah (Peachey) Van Dyne, the former steward of the Sanatarium for the past twenty-five years. Child, Paul Van Dyne, born August 8,...

Biographical Sketch of R. C. Newland

Mr. & Mrs. R. C. Newland were married March 20, 1856, in Bedford, Indiana, which was also their birth place. Mrs. Newland’s maiden name was Catherine J. Swan and she was born August 17, 1834. Mr. Newland was born Dec. 24, 1836. In 1864, they moved to Galva, Illinois, where they resided until 1881 when they moved to Ida County, Iowa and made their home on a farm near Clarendon. Through the influence of Mrs. B. M. Miller (their daughter) who was born at Galva, Illinois, the name of Clarendon, Iowa, was changed to Galva, Iowa. They had 5 children: James T. Newland, Mrs. C. M. Cole, Mrs. B. M. Miller, Mrs. Charles A. Davis, and John C....

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