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Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

Contributions of the Old Residents’ Historical Association, Lowell MA

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 6 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were continued by the contributions by the Lowell Historical Society. Volume I A Fragment, written in 1843, by Theodore Edson Boott, Kirk, by Theodore Edson Carpet-Weaving and the Lowell Manufacturing Company, by Samuel Fay Dana, Samuel L., Memoir of, by John O. Green Early Recollections of an Old Resident, by Josiah B. French East Chelmsford (now Lowell), Families Living in, in 1802, by Z. E. Stone Green, Benjamin, Biography of, by Lewis Green Hale, Moses, Early Manufacturer of Wool, &c., in E. Chelmsford, by Alfred Gilman History of an Old Firm, by Charles Hovey Jackson, General, in Lowell, by Z. E. Stone Jackson, Patrick T., by John A. Lowell Knapp, Daniel, Autobiography of Letters (Three) of Samuel Batchelder First Census of Lowell; the Hamilton Manufacturing Company; first Manufacture of the Power-Loom Drilling Letters (Three) of Samuel Lawrence John Brown; Milton D. Whipple; the Purchase of the Outlets of the N. H. Lakes, the sources of the Merrimack Lewis, Joel, Reminiscences of, by Joshua Merrill Livingston, William, by Josiah B. French Locke, Joseph, Life and Character of, by John A. Knowles Lowell and Harvard College, by John O. Green Contains a list of alumni and graduates of Harvard University, now or formerly residing in Lowell. July 1877. Lowell and the Monadnocks, by Ephraim Brown Lowell and Newburyport, by Thomas B. Lawson Lowell, Francis Cabot, by Alfred Gilman Lowell Institution for Savings, Semi-Centennial History of, by Geo. J. Carney Lowell, Mayors of...

Biography of R.C. Nesmith

R. C. Nesmith, attorney at law of Smithville, was born in Dekalb County in 1837, a son of William A. and Elizabeth M. (McDowell) Nesmith. The father is of Scotch- Irish decent, born in 1799, in York District, South Carolina. In 1809 with his father, William Nesmith, immigrated to Blount County, E. Tenn. A year later they went to northern Alabama, where for a number of years they lived among the Cherokee Indians. In 1824 he came to Dekalb County, and three years later married. He settled in the Nineteenth district, where he engaged in wagon making and farming. There were but two wagons in the county when he settled there. He has lived in various portions of the county, but for past few years has made his home in Smithville. From 1859 to 1862 he was county tax collector. He is the oldest living man in the county, and until the last seven years was unusually vigorous and active. He is rather eccentric, witty and humorous. He is now quite feeble. His wife was born in Wilson County in1803, and died April, 1885. She was the mother of eleven children, of whom nine are living, our subject being the seventh. He attended the common schools but a short time. At the age of seventeen he began teaching, continuing four sessions. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, Forty-fifth Tennessee Infantry. He was engaged in the battle of Murfreesboro, was captured and made prisoner of war. He was retained at Camp Douglas three months, then exchanged at City Point and rejoined his command at Tullahoma. In August, 1863, he...

Biography of Hon. James Willis Nesmith

HON. JAMES WILLIS NESMITH. – Oregon has given a few men to the nation; and the luster of their memory still shines in the galaxy of her heroes. Colonel Baker, one of the most brilliant men ever at Washington, District of Columbia, has coupled with his title that of senator from Oregon. Yet he was in no sense an Oregon-made man, but rather made use of Oregon to elevate him to a seat which it was impossible for him to attain from Illinois. With Colonel Nesmith, however, the case was the reverse. He was as truly an Oregon man as one of his age could be, not only coming to our state with the first immigration, but gaining largely here his education, principles and manners. As a commanding historical figure, it will be proper here to notice the circumstances of his life, his political career, and his mental and moral characteristics. We do not often find distinguished ability without finding also antecedent capacity in the ancestry. The family to which our senator belonged is remotely of Scotch Presbyterian blood, but as early as 1690 removed to the north of Ireland, becoming thereafter of the Scotch-Irish race, who have made themselves famous on both sides of the Atlantic. In 1718 the family removed to America; and William Morrison Nesmith, the father of our subject, connected himself by marriage, about 1814, to Miss Harriet Willis, of a distinguished old family of New Jersey, her father owning the site of Elizabethtown in that state. The young couple, however, made their home in Maine; and their third child and only son, James Willis,...

Biography of William L. Nesmith

William L. Nesmith is one of the Kansas pioneers. He had lived in this state more than forty years, having come here in 1874 with his young wife and their wagon trip from Iowa was in the nature of a honeymoon journey. For a great many years William Nesmith was actively engaged in merchandising and in other affairs at Wilson, and is now a resident of Salina and a member of the grocery house of Nesmith & Son. His public spirit as a citizen and his generous contributions to educational institutions and moral movements have been on a par with his notable business success. His birth occurred April 24, 1852, in a log house on a farm in Van Buren County, Iowa. His parents were Joseph T. and Jane (Truscott) Nesmith, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of England. His father was born September 1, 1823, and spent his life as a farmer. For many years he lived in Ellsworth County, Kansas, and died at Wilson in this state December 1, 1898. He was an active member of the Methodist Protestant Church. In 1845, in Van Buren County, Iowa, he married Miss Truscott, who was born in 1829 in England, and came to America in 1836 with her parents, Stephen and Ann (Benny) Truscott, who lived to be past ninety years of age. Both the Nesmith and Truscott families were among the early pioneers of Iowa, having settled there when Iowa was still a territory. Mrs. Joseph Nesmith died in Iowa County of that state in 1904. All her life she was very sincere and devoted...

Biography of Jeremiah Garvin

Jeremiah Garvin, of Chichester, an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature and a veteran of the Civil War, was born January 3, 1842, at the family homestead on Garvin Hill, where he now resides, son of Jesse and Eunice (Leavitt) Garvin. The father, a native of Pembroke, N.H., was reared upon a farm near Garvin Falls, Pembroke. When a young man he was engaged for several years in rafting logs on the Merrimac River. Subsequently turning his attention to agricultural pursuits, he purchased a large farm in Chichester. This property, situated in the southern part of the town, is known as Garvin’s Hill, which is twelve hundred feet above the level of the sea. In 1840 Jesse Garvin erected the present substantial brick residence, which is still one of the principal landmarks in Chichester; and he resided here for the rest of his life. He was twice married. His first wife, in maidenhood named Morrison, and who was a native of Pembroke, bore him two children. Of these Wilson D. survives, and resides in Concord, N.H. He wedded Olive Ann Leavitt, of Chichester, and his children are: William, Etta, Idalette, and Alonzo. Jesse Garvin‘s second wife, Eunice (Leavitt) Garvin, a daughter of Jonathan Leavitt, of Chichester, became the mother of thirteen children, of whom there are living-Benjamin, Nancy, Lucretta, Solomon L., Mary, John E., Ann Maria and Jeremiah (twins), and Emma L. Benjamin married Adeline Kimball, of Hillsborough, N.H., and has four sons-Jefferson, Herbert, Frank, and Jesse. Nancy is now the widow of Moses O. Pearson, late of Manchester, N.H.; and her children are: Nellie, Elizabeth, and Bertha. Lucretta...

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