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Descendants of Leonard Crocker Couch of Taunton MA

COUCH (Taunton family). The family bearing this name at Taunton whose representative head is now Leonard Crocker Couch, Esq., who since boyhood has been a resident of the city, occupied in mechanical and business lines, and for years one of the substantial men and useful citizens of the community, is one of long and honorable standing in the neighboring State of Connecticut and of distinction in our country. And through its Taunton alliance of a generation ago – that of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, of Civil war fame, the father of the present Leonard Crocker Couch just alluded to – with the family of Crockers, it is connected with some of the first families of Ancient Taunton and of the Bay State, among them the Leonards. Simon Couch, ancestor of the Taunton family of the name, appears as a freeman of Fairfield, Conn., in October, 1664. From manuscript in the possession of a descendant a tradition is found that Thomas and Simon Couch ran away from England, secreting themselves on board a vessel; sailed for America; that they landed at New Haven, where they separated, Thomas going to the east and Simon westward as far as Greens Farms, etc. Simon Couch married Mary, daughter of Francis Andrews, of Bankside. He became a large land-holder at Greens Farms. His will was probated in 1689. He was buried on land belonging to him at Frost Point, looking out over the sound, which he had set apart as a family burying ground and which was long known as the Couch Burial Hill. His wife survived him, dying in 1691. In his...

Wright Family of Boston, MA

WRIGHT. The family of this name is an early Boston family, which through marriage is allied with some of the historic families of New England, among them those of Adams, Winslow and Wentworth. We give herewith an outline of the earlier generations, beginning with the first ancestor in this country. (I) Richard Wright, born about 1607, died in Plymouth, Mass., June 9, 1691. In 1644 he married Hester Cook, and they had children: Adam, Esther and Mary. (II) Adam Wright, born about 1644, died Sept. 20, 1724. He was twice married, having by his first wife, Sarah (Soule), two children, John and Isaac, and by his second wife, Mehitable (Barrows), four children, Samuel, Moses, James and Nathan. (III) Samuel Wright, born about 1700, died Jan. 5, 1773. He was of Plympton. By his wife, Anna (Tillson), born about 1704, died Nov. 16, 1792, he had children as follows: Ruth, born Aug. 12, 1723; Ruth (2), March 1, 1725; Sarah, June 3, 1726 (married a Hall); Samuel, Oct. 6, 1728; Edmund, Oct. 28, 1730; Jacob, April 17, 1733; Lydia, Sept. 22, 1736. (IV) Jacob Wright, of Plympton, born April 17, 1733, son of Samuel and Anna (Tillson) Wright, died March 30, 1818. He married Deborah Torrey, of Weymouth, born Sept. 18, 1731, died Dec. 31, 1820. Children: Ann, born Jan. 1, 1753; Zadoc, April 17, 1754 (served in the Revolutionary war); Joseph, Oct. 31, 1756; Deborah, April 14, 1761; Edmund, July 26, 1763; Jabez, July 13, 1765; Silas, March 7, 1773 (died in Boston). (V) Edmund Wright, of Boston, born July 26, 1763, died in Boston, Dec. 10, 1837. He...

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the first or lower dam was, prior to 1826, a part of Steuben, and was called Narraguagus to distinguish it from the settlement in the southwestern part, which was called “Head of the Bay,” and the post office at Cherryfield was called “Narraguagus” until within some twenty-five years past. What is now the flourishing town of Milbridge was a part of Harrington until 1848. Harrington (No. 5) was incorporated as a town in 1791, Steuben (No. 4) in 1795, Cherryfield (No. 11) in 181G, and the northeast part of Steuben was annexed to Cherryfield in 1826. I find that prior to the incorporation of Harrington, that township and No. 11, Cherryfield, held their plantation meetings and kept their records as one organization. At that time most of the settlers in Harrington lived at Mill River, where the earliest settlement was made. There was no settlement at what is now Harrington village until several years later. I have found it impossible to ascertain the date of the very earliest settlement upon the...

Sawyer Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Josiah Sawyer, about 1757, came from Cape Elizabeth and settled near the river in what is now Milbridge Maine. His wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse Brown. There were born to them four sons and four daughters, Josiah, Jr., William, George B., John, Lydia, Sally, Jane and Hannah.

Patten Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Isaac Patten, by trade a tanner, born in Billerica, Mass., and who married there and had some family, having lost his wife, came to Gouldsboro to set up his trade, about or near the time that Campbell and Nickels came to Steuben. In Gouldsboro, he married for a second wife Amy Allen. The children of Isaac and Amy Patten were John, Mary, William, Elizabeth, Tobias, Lydia, David and Nathaniel.

Leighton Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

About 1760, two brothers, Thomas and Samuel Leighton, came from Falmouth to this River. Samuel settled on the lot now in possession of Richard P. Willey. His sons were Theodore Leighton, Isaac Leighton, Parritt Leighton and Phineas Leighton. Thomas Leighton, the brother of Samuel Leighton, settled upon a lot at the head of Pigeon Hill Bay. He had a family of six sons and five daughters. Robert, Joseph, Thomas, Annie, Molly, James, Ross, Abigail, Betsey, Sarah and Benjamin. Nearly at the same time that Thomas and Samuel Leighton came and settled, Thomas Leighton 2d came from Dover, N. H., to Gouldsboro. His wife was Lydia Tracy. It is not known that there was any relationship between these two Thomas Leightons. From Gouldsboro, Thomas 2d soon removed to Steuben and settled upon the lot afterwards known as the Henry Leighton lot. He had ten children, Jonathan, Mark, Charity, Alexander, Hatevil, Pamelia, Isaiah, Daniel, Israel and Asa.

Descendants of Captain Michael Pierce

The Pierce family is one of the ancient Colonial families of the Commonwealth, the forerunners of the name playing a conspicuous part as masters of vessels bringing hither emigrants from England. For several generations there has lived in New Bedford a branch of the old Rehoboth and Swansea Pierce family, descendants of Capt. Michael Pierce, who have been leading-spirits in the community — names especially conspicuous in the industrial life of the town and vicinity. Reference is made particularly to some of the descendants of the late Otis Norton Pierce, whose son, the late Hon. Andrew Granville Pierce, was for forty-two years treasurer of the Wamsutta Mills Company, an extensive and the most successful cotton industry of New Bedford, serving, too, for a time as its president, and who was officially connected with many other enterprises of New Bedford and elsewhere; and who, too, was hardly less prominent in the public affairs of the place, serving as the chief executive officer of the city and as a member of the city government; to another son, Otis Norton Pierce, Jr., who was long chief clerk of the Wamsutta Mills Company and of the New Bedford and Taunton Railroad Company, and has been officially identified with a number of corporations of New Bedford, being at present president of the Grinnell Manufacturing Company; to the sons of the first mentioned of these brothers, Andrew G., who are now actively carrying forward to even greater success the work of their father; to Charles M. Peirce, deceased, who was long in business in New Bedford, active and influential in municipal and legislative work; and...

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