Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biography of James C. Murray

Prominent among the enterprising and substantial business men of Jamesport is the subject of this sketch. James C. Murray was born in Belmont county, Ohio, April 8, 1847. He is the son of John and Rose (Moneghan) Murray, natives of Ireland. His education was acquired in the schools of his native State and immediately after leaving school, at the early age of sixteen years, he enlisted under the stars and stripes in Company E, Ninety-eighth Ohio Infantry, but had great difficulty in getting into the army on account of youthfulness, being several times dismissed and ordered home by the drilling officers, but nothing daunted young Murray’s indomitable perseverance and pluck finally prevailed and he was mustered into the army in the month of July, 1862, and subsequently participated in the battles of Perryville, Chicamauga, Missionary Ridge; was wounded at Jonesborough, Georgia, and sent thence to Nashville, Tennessee, arriving in titne to be present on the occasion of the battle in and around Nashville, where the Federal forces, under General George B. Thomas, brought to a disastrous close the Confederate General John B. Hood’s campaign in Tennessee. While convelascing in the hospital he was detailed as steward, and had under his charge one hundred and twenty patients, one of whom was taken with the smallpox, and in assisting. him in an ambulance, he contracted that dread disease and for four weeks was prostrated with a very severe attack. After recovery he was detailed to take charge of the hospital guard, but was averse to this service, and asked to be sent to the front. He was ordered back to his old...

Murray, Robert Owen – Obituary

Robert Owen Murray was born in Fulton County, Indiana, January 4, 1847, and died October 29, 1902. Aged 55 years 9 months 25 days. Married in 1881 to Mary Bowman. Born to them four children, one of whom preceded in death. Survivors are wife, three daughters and relatives. Member United Brethren church. Funeral at the home; Rev. S. P. Korster; Bowman Cemetery. Owen Murray, ex-trustee of Wayne township, died Wednesday night at 8 o’clock and was buried Friday at 10 o’clock; Bowman Cemetery. Contributed by: Shelli...

Genealogy of Marion Marvin Spracklin

Marvin M. Spracklin, son of George Spracklin and Arloa Turner Minor, remained a resident of Shelby County, Illinois for the rest of his life. On October 13, 1870 he married Mary Elizabeth Deal, daughter of Elias and Francis Elizabeth Broyles Deal. In 1877 Marvin became “our new groceryman, (had) adopted for his motto ‘quick sales and small profits,’ in consequence of which together with his affable nature and genial smiles, he (had) already secured for himself his full share of ‘public patronage’.” In 1906 Marvin had another occasion to smile since he had entered the Shelbyville Democrat office “Tuesday noon wearing a broad smile ‘the which won’t come off.’ Another grandboy to trot on his knee. The youngster (had) arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Murray early Tuesday morning and (tipped) the beam at ten pounds.” By 1918 Marvin and his wife owned six acres in Section 20 Cowden Township. Shortly thereafter they moved to Shelbyville, Illinois. Toward their later years in life, a surprise birthday dinner was given for Mrs. Spracklin’s 75th birthday. “Sixty-four of her relatives and friends gathered at the Spracklin home at noon. Among those present were her two brothers and their wives, Mr. and Mrs. James Deal of Lakewood, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Deal and son Leon of St. Elmo; a sister, Mrs. Joseph Forsyth of Tower Hill. Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Spracklin of Tower Hill were present. A good time was reported by all and they departed wishing Mrs. Spracklin many more happy birthdays. Marvin M. Spracklin “passed away at his home in this city (Shelbyville) at 3:15 o’clock Friday...

Treaty of May 6, 1828

Articles of a Convention, concluded at the City of Washington this sixth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, between James Barbour, Secretary of War, being especially authorized therefore by the President of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs and Head Men of the Cherokee Nation of Indians, West of the Mississippi , they being duly authorized and empowered by their Nation. Whereas, it being the anxious desire of the Government of the United States to secure to the Cherokee nation of Indians, as well those now living within the limits of the Territory of Arkansas, as those of their friends and brothers who reside in States East of the Mississippi, and who may wish to join their brothers of the West, a permanent home, and which shall, under the most solemn guarantee of the United States, be, and remain, theirs forever- a home that shall never, in all future time, be embarrassed by having extended around it the lines, or placed over it the jurisdiction of a Territory or State, nor be pressed upon by the extension, in any way, of any of the limits of any existing Territory or State; and, Whereas, the present location of the Cherokees in Arkansas being unfavorable to their present repose, and tending, as the past demonstrates, to their future degradation and misery; and the Cherokees being anxious to avoid such consequences, and yet not questioning their right to their lands in Arkansas, as secured to them by Treaty, and resting also upon the pledges given them by the President of the United...

Biography of Thomas Murray, M.P.P.

Thomas Murray, member of the Local Parliament for North Renfrew, is a native of the county of Carleton, Out., dating his birth in the township of Gouldbourn, January 18, 1836. His father, James Murray, from King’s county, Ireland, came to Canada about 1825, and was engaged in commercial pursuits and afterwards farming, dying at Gouldbourn about 1846. The mother of our subject was Elizabeth Burrows, who died in 1854. Mr. Murray received his education in his native township, and at Smith’s Falls; and when fourteen years of age became an apprentice to the mercantile business with the late W. R. R. Lyon, of Richmond, county of Carleton. Mr. Murray married Miss Jane Copeland, of Richmond, in 1855, being about that time in business for himself in Ottawa; in 1859 removed to Pembroke, where, in company with his late brother Michael, under the firm of Murray Brothers, he commenced and did an extensive business as general merchants, for about five years, when Michael, who was a shrewd business man and very popular, died of brain fever, leaving a young widow and one child, now Miss Elizabeth Murray. He then took his next youngest brother, William, as a partner, and changed the name of the firm to T. and W. Murray, and has since carried on a large general business, dealing in lumber, and extensively in produce and raw furs. They have had their set back in the last four or five years, like hundreds of other lumber dealers, but remembering the good luck of former years, they are pushing on, full of hope and good cheer, fortune already beginning to...

Biographical Sketch of M. Murray

M. Murray, banker, stock raiser and dealer in general merchandise, was born in Scotland in 1840; came to America at the age of seventeen years, located at Little Sioux, and was in the employ of the mail service at fifteen dollars per month until 1862, when he removed to Denver, Col, and engaged in the stock and freight business. Six years later he returned to this place and engaged in his present business. He owns a fine stock farm of several hundred acres near town, on which still stands the little old log house that he arrived at in 1857, a penniless Scotch lad. It was the first building used for a store in Harrison...

Slave Narrative of Rev. Eli Boyd

Person Interviewed: Rev. Eli Boyd Location: Dade County, Florida Dade County, Florida, Folklore Ex-Slaves Reverend Eli Boyd was born May 29, 1864, four miles from Somerville, South Carolina on John Murray’s plantation. It was a large plantation with perhaps one hundred slaves and their families. As he was only a tiny baby when freedom came, he had no “recomembrance” of the real slavery days, but he lived on the same plantation for many years until his father and mother died in 1888. “I worked on the plantation just like they did in the real slavery days, only I received a small wage. I picked cotton and thinned rice. I always did just what they told me to do and didn’t ever get into any trouble, except once and that was my own fault. “You see it was this way. They gave me a bucket of thick clabber to take to the hogs. I was hungry and took the bucket and sat down behind the barn and ate every bit of it. I didn’t know it would make me sick, but was I sick? I swelled up so that I all but bust. They had to doctor on me. They took soot out of the chimney and mixed it with salt and made me take that. I guess they saved my life, for I was awful sick. “I never learned to read until I was 26 years old. That was after I left the plantation. I was staying at a place washing dishes for Goodyear’s at Sapville, Georgia, six miles from Waycross. I found a Webster’s spelling book that had...

Biography of Lilburn H. Murray

LILBURN H. MURRAY, Springfield. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is one of the best known men in Greene County. For many years engaged in business enterprises in which his name was always a synonym of integrity, he has in more recent years been the proprietor and publisher of the Springfield Democrat, which he has conducted in a liberal and able manner. He springs from sterling Scotch-Irish stock. John Murray, the father of our subject, was born in North Carolina, and received the common education of his day, and married Sarah Luttele, in Tennessee, where he lived some time. After marriage, 1834, he moved to Crawford County, Missouri, where he settled on a farm. He came to Greene County in 1835, and settled seven miles north of Springfield; 1837 he settled in what is now Murray Township, where he died in 1867. He was one of the substantial men of his township, owning 700 acres of land and some slaves. He reared a large family of children: James A.; M. L.; John K.; Marshall C., who died at sixty years of age, the father of a family; L. H.; Rhoda M.; Arimentia T. and David L. All the children except L. H. were born in Tennessee, within twenty miles of Knoxville. Mr. Murray was one of the prominent pioneers of Greene County. In religious opinion he was a Methodist, one of the founders of the Methodist Church in this county. His house was the home of the Methodist circuit riders of those early days, and many interesting religious meetings were held there. He was a Democrat in political...

Biography of David Murray

DAVID MURRAY. – This gentleman is a well-known capitalist. He has retired from active business, and is now reaping the benefits of a life full of even and unceasing hard work. David Murray is a name that every youngster in the Kittitass valley, Washington, is familiar with. It might be well for those very same youths if they had a few of the hardships to go through that Mr. Murray did in his early life. He was born in Maine in 1831, and at the age of twenty left his home to seek his fortunes in the Golden state of California. he embarked onboard one of the sailing vessels that brought a dry dock to the Pacific coast. Rounding the “Horn” with that massive bulk in cargo was no very safe undertaking. However, reaching California, he settled at Vallejo, on San Francisco Bay; and, not having been overstocked with money upon leaving his home, he was forced to accept what work he could obtain. He did the first work that was ever done on Mare Island, where the government works and navy yard now are. After finishing his employment there, he led a life of various pursuits for a period of ten years, among which were mining, lumbering and ranching during the great Caribou gold excitement of 1862 he made his way to that field, and took up a ranch on the Fraser river, 150miles above Fort Yale, He was the first rancher in that locality, and worked assiduously on his claim for a period of six or seven years. In 1870 he gave up the ranch there, and...
Page 2 of 3123

Pin It on Pinterest