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Slave Narrative of Annie Morgan

Interviewer: Mamie Hanbery Person Interviewed: Annie Morgan Location: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Age: 65 Place of Residence: 207 W. 2nd St., Hopkinsville, Ky Story of Annie Morgan: (age 65, 207 W. 2nd St., Hopkinsville, Ky.) Annie was born of slave parents. Her mother and father were slaves of the Payne family. Ques: Annie can you give me or rather tell me of some of your earlier life with your parents, or what your mother and father has told you of things before and after the Civil War. Ans: Wal, wal, I do declare it has ben so long I’se jes don’t remember. I’se seem to remember de big days we uster hav on Proclamation Day wen we used ter go to Grandmums who lived in Trigg County. Foh days befur weuns would git redy ter go in a wagon and as dar was a heap of chilluns it tuk quite a time an weuns would start by day break and dem wen we got dar why all de rest of the daughters en sons of dar chilluns was alredy that, den weun’s hev a big time wid watermullins and ebything good to eat. Some times Uncle Ben brot hid bajo and us chilluns would dance. Ques: Annie did you ever have a dream to come true? Or do you believe in dreams? Ans: Sho does, sho does, why chile all my dream come true. I recollect one wen my son was sick, I felt he wont gwine to git well. I asked him, “Was he right with God”, he says, “Dar is nuthin between me and de Lawd”. Den afterwards, I...

Will of Charles Morgan – 1668

CHARLES MORGAN, Gravesend. Makes wife Katharine sole executrix. Leaves to son Charles the lot or Plantations recorded to him in the Towne Books of Gravesend. To my other three sons, Thomas, John, and Daniel, the land and Plantation I now live on, and the barn that was formerly Slynihah Loras. His wife is to have the use of the said premises, “to dwell in soe long as shee shall keepe herself a widow. All this is my mynde and will soe to be.” Mentions daughters Mary, Rachel, and Susannah. Dated “Thirteenth day of 7th month 1668.” Witness Wm. Goulding, Sam’l Spicer. Proved Oct. 7, 1668. Inventory mentions a very large number of articles of domestic use, and 6 acres of wheat, 5 acres Corn, 4 acres Oats, 2 acres Rye, 7 acres Peas. LIBER 1-2, page...

Biographical Sketch of Daniel Morgan

DANIEL MORGAN was born December 23, 1796, in Chatham County, N. C. His parents were William and Milla (Brewer) Morgan, both natives of the same State. They both died of a fever the same day in 1804. They are buried on Hall River, N. C. Our subject came to Christian County, Ky., in 1805, with his grandfather and uncle-Nathaniel and George Brewer. Daniel is one of the two oldest men in this part of the county, James Wilke being the other. Father Morgan had five brothers. These brothers never lived together after the death of their father, and so far as known, he is the only brother living. He was the second child, and started without means. He now owns 500 acres of land, which he has divided among his children. He was married to Abarilla Martin, of this county, November 18, 1817. She died in 1847. She was a member of the Baptist Church. In 1848, he married Rebecca Tucker, of this county. She died in 1860. She was a member of the Baptist Church. She left four children, viz.: William D., James A., Nannie E. and Mary E., all of whom are living. Nannie E. is the wife of Samuel Cowan. Their children are Samuel F. and William D. In 1862 he married Susan Leveritt, of this county, but a native of South Carolina. She died in 1872, aged fifty-seven years. She also was a member of the Baptist Church. Father Morgan has been a member of the Baptist Church the past fifty years, and a Deacon in that church nearly forty...

Biographical Sketch of Lelia Morgan

(See Oolootsa)-Gideon Morgan, born April 3, 1851, married June,25, 1874, Mary Llewellyn Payne, born Oct. 1, 1855 in Sebastian County, Arkansas. Mr. Morgan was elected Senator from Tahlequah District August 5, 1901 ; and was elected a member of the State Legislature from Mayes County in the fourth and seventh Legislatures. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan were the parents of Houston Mayo, Mary Llewellyn, Martha Lelia, Margaret Elizabeth, Amanda Payne, Sallie Mayo, and Nellie Payne...

Biography of Gideon Morgan

This well-known citizen of Tahlequah was born April 3, 1851, in Athens, Tennessee, the son of Major William Morgan and grandson of Colonel Gideon Morgan, of Stonewall Jackson’s army. His father was an officer in General John H. Morgan’s command, and was killed at the battle of Lexington, Kentucky, in 1862. The Morgans originally came from Wales. Colonel Gideon Morgan, already referred to, married Margaret Sevier, a granddaughter of General Sevier, who was half Cherokee, through his family connection with the Lowreys. Martha Mayo, daughter of G. W. Mayo, a white man, was mother to the subject of our sketch. He was educated by a female tutor, Miss Bettie Messimer, of Monroe County, Tennessee, until his twentieth year, when he came to Fort Gibson (in 1871), and in three years afterward married Mary Llewellan Payne, the most beautiful young woman of her time, and equally accomplished. Since then Mr. Morgan has spent most of his time farming, and at the present owns 70 acres of land on the edge of Fort Smith, one acre of which he has sold for $370. His ranch, twelve miles from the capital, contains 100 acres in cultivation, and a fine orchard. He also owns the Capital Hotel and a residence with four acres of land, beside the Baptist Mission House, in Tahlequah. In 1879 Mr. Morgan was a strong supporter of the National party, but declined a nomination for the senate. In 1891 he ran for circuit judge on the Liberal ticket, and was defeated; this is the only office which he ever sought. Mr. Morgan is a progressionist, and believes in allotment,...

Biography of H.B. Morgan

J. L. Bryant & Co. This firm is now composed of H. B. Morgan and J. W. Motlow. It was first established in 1872, by J. L. Bryant (now deceased) and H. B. Morgan. J. L. Bryant had himself been in business in Lynchburg since 1806. He was born September 25, 1824, in Lincoln County, and was reared in west Tennessee, and when a young man returned to Moore County, and on August 24, 1845, married Finetta B. Leftwich, and engaged in merchandising at Charity, in this county, continuing in mercantile pursuits until his death. In 1865 he was at Shelbyville, and removed from there to Lynchburg. He was also an extensive farmer and stock trader. He was drowned April 5, 1883, at Shelbyville. He was a very popular man, and was identified with the social and public interests, and was one of the most successful business men of Moore County. There now survives him a family of two daughters and his widow. H. B. Morgan was born October 14, 1842, in Lincoln County, Tennessee, being a son of W. A. and Mary (Davidson) Morgan, both now living near Montgomery, Alabama. Young Morgan remained on the farm until 1861, when he enlisted with the “boys in gray” and served till the battle of Franklin, in 1864, in which he lost an arm. He returned home in June 1865, and farmed for one year. He then became deputy sheriff of Lincoln County, holding that office four years, and was then elected sheriff for four years. In 1872 he entered the above named firm, and has been very successful. He was...

Biographical Sketch of S. H. Morgan

S.H. Morgan, of the firm of Morgan & Berry, grocers, was born in Ind.; moved to Lucas County, Iowa, in 1859. He enlisted in 1861, in Co. C., 13th Ia. Vol.; served until Sept., 1862; then returned to Lucas County and engaged in farming; removed to Harrison County in 1864 and settled in St. Johns and engaged in the drug business; removed to Missouri in 1868, and came back to Harrison County in 18777 and located at Missouri Valley and engaged in his present...

Biographical Sketch of M. Morgan

M. Morgan, of the firm of Butler & Morgan, grocers, was born in Scott County, Ia., in 1846. He enlisted in May 1864, in the 44th Ia. regiment, and was discharged in the autumn of the same year. He re-enlisted in Jan., 1865, in the 20th, Ia., Co. G.; was transferred to the 29th Ia. regiment, and in Sept. 1865, returned to Iowa, and engaged in farming. He located at Mapleton in 1879, and entered his present business in Jan.,...

Biography of General Daniel Morgan

General Daniel Morgan was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1737, and moved to Virginia in 1755. He was a private soldier under General Braddock, and after the defeat of that officer returned to his occupation of a farmer and a wagoner. When the war of the Revolution broke out, he joined the army under General Washington, at Cambridge, and commanded a corps of riflemen. He was with General Montgomery at Quebec, and with General Gates at Saratoga, in both of which battles he greatly distinguished himself. For his bravery he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General, and joined the army in the South. After the battle of Camden, when General Greene assumed the chief command, General Morgan was detached to raise troops in the western part of the State and in South Carolina. He soon became distinguished as a partisan officer, inspiring confidence and arousing the despondent Whigs to a more active sense of duty. His victory at the Cowpens was justly considered as one of the most brilliant and decided victories of the Revolution, and Congress accordingly voted him a gold medal. At the close of the war, he returned to his farm. In 1794 he was appointed by General Washington to quell the Whisky Insurrection in Western Virginia, and after the difficulties were settled, he was elected a member of Congress and served from 1797 to 1799. His health failing, he declined a re-election. His farm in Clarke county, a few miles from Winchester, Va., was called Saratoga. In 1800, he removed to Winchester, where he died on the 6th of July, 1802, in...

Biographical Sketch of Capt. Henry E. Morgan

CAPT. HENRY E. MORGAN. – This well-known pioneer of 1849 is a native of Groton, Connecticut, and was born October 30, 1825. He moved with his parents to Meriden, in the same state, residing there until April, 1849, when he set forth for California in a bark via Cape Horn, arriving in San Francisco the following September. A short time afterwards he began a sea-faring life, and for fifteen years sailed the ocean. During that time he entered nearly all the noted foreign ports, and later purchased a vessel of his own and followed a coasting trade. In 1858 he located in Port Townsend, Washington territory, and after quitting the sea began to till the soil, and followed farming for six years. In 1863 he was elected representative from Jefferson county, and ably filled that office for two terms. In 1879 he was appointed inspector of hulls for the Puget sound district. He has invested from time to time in real estate in Port Townsend, and is now one of the largest property owners of the city, and after the buffetings of many years is safely anchored in a happy home, esteemed by his acquaintances and honored by the citizens of the town in which he lives. His family consists of a wife and one...
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