Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Staples Family of Taunton, MA

STAPLES (Taunton family). The Staples name is one of long and honorable standing in New England and the country. The family has been a continuous one in the Bay State for two hundred and seventy and more years, and at Taunton, in this Commonwealth, have lived generation after generation of the name down to the present – a worthy race, one representative of the best type of citizenship. Such men in more recent generations as the two Sylvanus Staples, father and son, and the latter’s son Sylvanus Nelson Staples, and the two Ebenezer Staples and Abiel B. Staples – all in line – have played well their part in the affairs of their communities in their day and generation. The Taunton Staples spring from the ancient Weymouth family of the name, from John Staple (the common spelling both in England and America at that period omitting the final “s”), who appears on the records of that town, it is said, in 1636. His wife’s name is given as Rebecca by the late Joseph W. Potter, of Bangor, Maine. John Staple became a freeman of the Colony May 10, 1648. He died July 4, 1683, in Dorchester, leaving according to his will, children John, Jr., of Braintree, Joseph of Taunton, Abraham of Mendon, Rebecca, wife of Samuel Sumner of Dorchester, and Sarah, wife of Increase Sumner, also of Dorchester. John Staple’s son Abraham was a proprietor of Mendon. He married in 1660 Mary, daughter of Robert Randall, of Weymouth, was a weaver by trade, served in King Philip’s war, and was known – probably from service in the militia –...

Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the first or lower dam was, prior to 1826, a part of Steuben, and was called Narraguagus to distinguish it from the settlement in the southwestern part, which was called “Head of the Bay,” and the post office at Cherryfield was called “Narraguagus” until within some twenty-five years past. What is now the flourishing town of Milbridge was a part of Harrington until 1848. Harrington (No. 5) was incorporated as a town in 1791, Steuben (No. 4) in 1795, Cherryfield (No. 11) in 181G, and the northeast part of Steuben was annexed to Cherryfield in 1826. I find that prior to the incorporation of Harrington, that township and No. 11, Cherryfield, held their plantation meetings and kept their records as one organization. At that time most of the settlers in Harrington lived at Mill River, where the earliest settlement was made. There was no settlement at what is now Harrington village until several years later. I have found it impossible to ascertain the date of the very earliest settlement upon the...

Wakefield Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Samuel Wakefield and his wife Mary Burbank, came from Kennebunk in 1756 or 57, and settled at the head of the bay on the lot now comprising a considerable part of Steuben village. Their children were Samuel, Lydia, Ruth, Benjamin, Phebe, Hannah and Sally. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Wakefield m. a widow Small, and their children were James, Myriam and Daniel.

Pin It on Pinterest