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A History of Seneca Falls New York Newspapers

The following information is an attempt to provide details into not only the history of Seneca Falls New York newspapers, but also the sources available online and offline for the genealogist and historian to access the newspapers, or transcriptions therefrom. Newspapers remain a vital source of material for genealogists. They often provide vivid insight into the lives of our ancestors unlike other factual records.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you want, click on the newsletter edition and then browse the pages until you find the specific biography you were looking for. This should help you find these wonderful biographies a little easier. SurnameGivenNewsletter Edition AckleyBenjaminSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleyJacobSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuel J.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 3 AlexanderWilliam H.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 2 AllenSilasSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 AlmySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 1 ArmstrongJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 1 BachmanJosephSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 1 BaileyEbenezerSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 4 BaileyGeorge & SamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeMahlonSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgePeterSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BaldwinJonas C.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 2 BangsAbnerSeneca County History...

Olcott Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Peter Olcott was born at Bolton, Connecticut, April 25, 1733; married Sarah, daughter of Peletiah Mills, Esq., of Windsor, Conn., October 11, 1759, and removed to that place in 1772. That year or the following one he came to Norwich, Vermont. He was the oldest of his parents’ four children (two sons and two daughters), and the only one of them to come to Norwich to reside. Mr. Olcott‘s name first appears in the town records of Norwich in 1773, when he was chosen one of the overseers of the poor, at the annual March meeting. He early took a leading part in public affairs in his new home. He was elected to the most important town offices, and soon came to be regarded as one of the leading men of the place. It is probable that he was a man of considerable means when he came to Norwich, which, united with his superior talents, gave him a commanding influence in the community. The next year (1774) the annual town meeting was held at his house, and such meetings continued to be so held until 1779, after which they were held at the meeting house, except in severe winter weather. Probably his influence was potent in fixing the location of the first meeting house very near to his residence and upon land which he gave for a site. He also gave the land for the old burying ground adjoining. Mr. Olcott was the first justice of the peace in town, being chosen to that office at a special town meeting called for that purpose April 7, 1778. In...

Slave Narrative of Francis Bridges

Person Interviewed: Francis Bridges Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Red River County, Texas Date of Birth: 1864 Age: 73 Occupatio I was born in Red River County, Texas in 1864, and that makes me 73 years old. I had myself 75, and I went to my white folks and they counted it un and told me I was 73, but I always felt like I was older than that. My husband’s name is Henry Bridges. We was raised up children together and married. I had five sisters. My brother died here in Oklahoma about two years ago. He was a Fisher. Mary Russell, my sister, she lives in Parish, Texas; Willie Ann Poke, she lives in Greenville, Texas; Winnie Jackson, lives in Adonia, Texas, and Mattie White, my other sister, lives in Long Oak, Texas, White Hunt County. Our Master was named Master Travis Wright, and we all ate nearly the same thing. Such things as barbecued rabbits, coon, possums baked with sweet potatoes and all such as that. I used to hang round the kitchen. The cook, Mama Winnie Long, used to feed all us little niggers on the flo’, jest like little pigs, in tin cups and wooden spoons. We ate fish too, and I like to go fishing right this very day. We lived right in old Master Wright’s yard. His house sat way up on a high hill. It was jest a little old log hut we lived in a little old shack around the yard. They was a lot of little shacks in the yard, I can’t tell jest how many, but...

Biography of Hon. Thomas G. Mills

HON. THOMAS G. MILLS. This very successful farmer and stockraiser of Shannon County, Missouri, is a native of Rutherford County, N. C., where he was born in 1833 to Calvin and Margaret (Jackson) Mills, who were also born in that State and county. When the subject of this sketch was two or three years old they removed to Lumpkin County, Ga., where the father died in 1866, and the mother in 1867, the latter having long been a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. The paternal grandfather, John Mills, had been a soldier of the Revolutionary War, was of Irish parentage, and during his life was engaged in tilling the soil. He died in Rutherford County, N. C., having reared a family of two sons and three daughters. The maternal grandfather, David Jackson, was of Dutch descent, as was also his wife, was a Revolutionary soldier, and was a worthy tiller of the soil, which occupation he was following in Rutherford County, N. C., at the time of his death. Thomas G. Mills was the youngest of six children, the other members of the family being: John, who died in Lumpkin County, Ga., after the war; Caroline, who died in Cherokee County, Ga., the wife of Pleasant Worley; William, who died in Cherokee County, Ga.; Zilpha, who also died there, the wife of David Cochran, and Jane, the widow of William Cochran. The advantages of the common schools were given to Thomas G. Mills in his youth, and in assisting his father in the work on the farm he strengthened his constitution and learned lessons of industry and economy...

Biography of Z. C. Mills

Z.C. MILLS. – Z.C. Mills of Seattle, Washington is a native of the Empire state, and was born in 1834. While yet in his boyhood, his parents moved to Illinois, where he grew to manhood and received his education. After he had reached his majority, he engaged in business with his father. He was successful; but, when an American has once felt the excitement of moving, it is almost impossible for him to be contented, so long as there are new countries to be found beyond the Western horizon. Accordingly, in 1859, when the Pike’s Peak gold excitement reached his home, young Mills started for the new El Dorado, and settled in the new town of Denver, where he opened a tin store. That country, not proving as productive as expected, Mr. Mills, with others, pulled up stakes in 1862, and started for the Salmon river diggings, which were then just reaching their fame as the richest strike yet. The party crossed the Rocky Mountains, the Bitter Creek Desert, Green River, the Wasatch Range, went down the Bear River past the famed soda springs, and had reached a point above Fort Hall, when news reached that the Salmon river gold bubble has burst reached them. They retraced their steps to Fort Hall, and there joined a train bound for Oregon. In the eastern part of that state they stopped, and went to mining in the diggings on the headwaters of Powder and Burnt Rivers. In three months time the Boise gold excitement swept them back to Idaho. They located in the beautiful Payette valley, and built the “Pickett Corrall,”...

Biography of George W. Mills

A self-made man who has not despised the day of small things, and who has used obstacles as stepping-stones to higher successes, has a right to regard his advancement with pride. It is comparatively easy for a man of reasonably good ability to achieve a business success on capital borrowed or inherited, but it requires real force of character to earn the capital by hard, persistent work, and save it and invest it successfully. George W. Mills, who enjoys the distinction of being one of the leading butchers of southeastern Idaho, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, September 13, 1854, a son of John and Amy (Clymens) Mills, and is descended from Scotch ancestry, inheriting many of the sterling qualities of that sturdy people. His father, John Mills, was born in Pennsylvania, and died there in his fifty-fourth year. His widow lived to be seventy-seven years old. They were lifelong members of the Presbyterian Church, and were of the most admirable character, industrious, economical, philanthropic and helpful to every worthy movement having the public good for its object. They had five sons and three daughters, and five of the eight are living at this time. After gaining a primary education in the public schools near his Pennsylvania home, George W. Mills began in 1867, when he was thirteen, to earn his own living. For twenty-seven years he worked for others, without getting on financially to any satisfactory extent. He came to Idaho Falls in 1885 and was first employed at carpenter’s trade. Later he did about any honest work his hands found to do and that any one would...

Biographical Sketch of George McKim Mills

Mills, George McKim; see ‘y E. F. Houseman Co.; born, Cleveland, Aug. 11, 1881; son of F. C. and Anna M. McKim Mills; educated, Cleveland public and Central High School and Case School of Applied Science; married, Cleveland, Sept. 4, 1912, Iris Ethel Weiner; sec’y the E. F. Horseman Co.; member The Cleveland Engineering Society; member Beta Theta Pi...
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