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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel. Woven in the narratives of it’s people, however, is the story of Colorado. Initial expeditions by European settlers in this area were for trade with the Natives or as a throughfare to California further west. It wasn’t until one of those wagon trains came a man name of Ralston and he dipped his pan into a creek which would later bare his name and pulled out a troy ounce of gold, worth $5 at the time. A decade later, and other miners began to claim the land in the eastern Colorado area. Pushing ever westward in search of the golden dust they eventually found their way into western Coloado. Some of these miners would eventually settle in the area of their mines and became Colorado’s first residents. Some would have their claim luck out and would stay taking up other responsibilities such as ranching, politics, merchandising, etc. In these people’s lives became the story of Colorado – so while this volume is comprised almost solely of biographies, it is also comprised of the history of early Western Colorado. Click on the page number to view the biography. SurnameGivenMiddleView Bio BurgerFrankMPage 17 TaylorEdwardTPage 18 ZerbeAllenLPage 21 VeatchWilliamLPage 23 HarpHoraceSPage 24 GeorgeAlfredPage 25 BrownHoraceGPage 26 HeatonWilliamVPage 27 ThompsonBenjaminHPage 28 WatsonBenjaminKPage 29 SherwoodBenjaminPage 30 DicksonAmosJPage...

The Meeting of Folsom and Nittakachih

When the council, convened for the adjustment and final distribution of the annuity, adjourned in such confusion, together with the animosity manifested and openly expressed by both contending parties the one toward the other, (a similar scene never before witnessed in a Choctaw council) I feared the consequences that I was apprehensive would follow; but hoped that the conflicting opinions then agitating my people would be harmonized upon calm reflection and the adoption of wise and judicious measures. But when I ascertained that Nittakachih and Amosholihubih were truly assembling their warriors, I began to view the matter in its true and proper light. I knew those two chiefs too well to longer doubt the full interpretations of their designs as set forth in their actions; for they both were men who indulged not in meaningless parade, or delighted in empty display. Inevitable war kindred against kindred and brother against brother with all its horrors and irreparable consequences now seemed to stare me in the face, with no alternative but to speedily prepare to meet it; therefore Le Flore and myself, after due deliberation, resolved, if we must fight, to confine the fighting as much as possible within Amosholihubih’s and Nittakachih’s own districts. We at once took up our line of march south toward Demopolis, which was in the district of Amosholihubih, and where they had assembled their warriors. At the termination of our second days march, we ascertained through our scouts, that Amosholihubih and Nittakachih were also advancing with their warriors to meet us. In vain I still sought for some pacific measures that might be advanced to stop...

The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew Jackson, who witnessed a similar one that of Tecumseh in council assembled with the Muskogee’s, shortly afterwards of which I will speak in the history of that once powerful and war-like race of people. Colonel John Pitchlynn was adopted in early manhood by the Choctaws, and marrying among them, he at once became as one of their people; and was named by them “Chahtah It-ti-ka-na,” The Choctaws Friend; and long and well he proved himself worthy the title Conferred upon, and the trust confided in him. He had five sons by his Choctaw wife, Peter, Silas, Thomas, Jack and James, all of who prove to be men of talent, and exerted a moral influence among their people, except Jack, who was ruined by the white man s whiskey and his demoralizing examples and influences. I was personally acquainted with Peter. Silas and Jack, the former held, during a long and useful life, the highest positions in the political history of his Nation, well deserving the title given him by the...

Treaty of August 20, 1851

TREATY MADE AND CONCLUDED AT CAMP LU-PI-YU-MA, AT CLEAR LAKE, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AUGUST 20, 1851, BETWEEN REDICK McKEE, INDIAN AGENT ON THE PART OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE CHIEFS, CAPTAINS AND HEAD MEN OF THE CA-LA-NA-PO, HA-BI-NA-PO, ETC., ETC., TRIBES OF INDIANS. A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at Camp Lu-pi-yu-ma, on the south side of Clear Lake, between Redick McKee, one of the Indian agents specially appointed to make treaties with the various Indian tribes in California, on the part of the United States, and the under-signed chiefs, captains and head men of the tribes or bands of Indians now in council at this camp, known as the Ca-la-na-po tribe, represented by the chief, Ju-lio and captains; Ha-bi-na-po tribe, represented by the chief, Pri-e-to and his captains; Da-no-ha-bo tribe, represented by the chief, Ku-kee; Mo-al-kai tribe, represented by the chief, Mob-shah and his captains; the co-tribe, represented by the chief, Cal-i-a-him and his captains; How-ku-ma tribe, represented by the chief, Chi-bec and his captains; Cha-nel-kai tribe, represented by the chief, Con-chu; and the Me-dam-a-dec tribe, represented by the chief, Co-e~u-e. ARTICLE 1. The said tribes or bands acknowledge themselves, jointly and severally, under the exclusive jurisdiction, authority, and protection of the United States, and hereby bind themselves to refrain hereafter from the commission of all acts of hostility and aggression towards the government or citizens thereof, and to live on terms of peace and friendship among themselves and with all other Indian tribes which are now or may hereafter come under the protection of the United States. ARTICLE 2. Lest the peace and...

Slave Narrative of Jenny McKee

Interviewer: Perry Larkey Person Interviewed: Jenny McKee Location: London, Kentucky Age: (about) 85 Mrs. Jenny McKee, of color, who lives just North of London can tell many interesting things of her life. “Aunt Jenny” as she is called, is about eighty-five years of age, and says she thinks she is older than that as she can remember many things of the slave days. She tells of the old “masters” home and the negro shacks all in a row behind the home. She has a scar on her forehead received when she was pushed by one of the other little slaves, upon a marble mantle place and received a deep wound in her head. The old negro lady slaves would sit in the door way of their little shacks and play with pieces of string, not knowing what else to do to pass off the time. They were never restless for they knew no other life than slavery. Aunt Jenny McKee was born in Texas though she doesn’t know what town she was born in. She remembers when her mother was sold into the hands of another slave owner, the name of the place was White Ranch Louisiana. Her mother married again, and this time she went by the name of Redman, her mother’s second husband was named John Redman, and Aunt Jenny altho her real name was Jenny Garden, carried the name of Redman until she was married to McKee. During the War her mother died with cholera, and after the war her step-father sold or gave her away to an old Negro lady by the name of Tillet,...

Biography of Thomas H. McKee

Thomas H. McKee is a representative of farming interests in Dover Township, his home being near Burlington. It was in that Township that he was born, May 16, 1854, his parents being James and Rebecca (Wilson) McKee. The father was born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1808 and the mother in Donegal, Ireland, in 1839. In early life they came to the new world and were married in Dover Township, Racine County, where their remaining days were passed, the father’s death occurring in 1873, while the mother survived until 1909. At the time of his arrival the country was wild and undeveloped, there being still evidences that at. a not very remote period the Indians had occupied the district. The homes were primitive and were widely scattered but progressive men from the east and other parts of the country were making their way into the district and bringing about a marked transformation. James McKee secured two hundred acres of land from the government and with characteristic energy began to break the sod turning the first furrows in the fields. He was a poor man when he came but as the years passed he won success and when his death occurred was in very comfortable circumstances. He was also a well educated and well read man and was widely and favorably known. He belonged to the Presbyterian Church and he gave his political allegiance to the Republican Party, being a firm believer in the efficacy of its principles as factors in good government. Mr. and Mrs. McKee were the parents of eight children, of whom six are yet living: John, a...

Biography of Leonard V. McKee

Leonard V. McKee. The life, the personal character and the influence of Leonard V. McKee impressed themselves strongly upon the formative period of Marshall County’s history. He was founder and president of the Frankfort State Bank, was a large land owner and one of the leading business men and citizens of the community. He was born in Allen County, Ohio, August 18, 1845, and died at his home in Frankfort, Kansas, December 22, 1916, aged seventy-one years, four months and four days. His parents, Robert and Sarah (Dunlap) McKee, were both natives of Ohio. His father was a cabinet maker by trade, and after his marriage engaged in farming in Ohio. In 1872 he came to Kansas and then lived retired until his death in 1880. His wife passed away at Seneca, Kansas, in 1875. Leonard V. McKee grew up in Ohio, attended the district schools of that state and gained his education in a time when schools were very inferior in point of equipment and efficiency of instruction to those of modern days. While attending school he also worked on the farm with his father. He was eighteen years of age when in May, 1864, he felt inspired by patriotism to enlist in the Union army. He went into Company E of the One Hundred and Fifty-first Ohio Infantry and was with that regiment about four months, engaged chiefly in the defenses around the City of Washington. After being mustered out he returned home and continued to live with his parents until at the age of twenty-five he married. Starting his independent career as a farmer, he left...

Biography of Ralph M. McKee

Ralph M. McKee is superintendent of the consolidated city schools at Neal in Greenwood County. He is one of the younger men engaged in educational work in Kansas, and had a highly creditable record for the work he had already done and stands high both among his fellow teachers and in his home community. Mr. McKee was born at Xenia, Ohio, December 1, 1893. His McKee ancestors were early settlers in America. Mr. McKee had strains of English and Irish ancestry, and inherits good qualities through both lines. His father, W. T. McKee, was born in Ohio in 1861, and first came to Kansas in 1880. For several years he was engaged in the cattle business about Grenola, and he was married at Concordia that state, where he farmed for several years. Later he returned to Xenia, Ohio, where he resumed farming, and in 1908 came back to Kansas, and had since been a farmer at Elk Falls. He is a democrat in politics. He married Anna E. Liggett, who was born in Ohio in 1862. Of their children, Austin, the oldest, died at Elk Falls, Kansas, at the age of twenty-four, having finished his education in Berea College in Berea, Kentucky. The second in age is Ralph M. and the youngest child is Julia, a graduate of the Howard High School and teaches at Howard, Kansas. Ralph M. McKee received his early training in the public schools at Xenia, Ohio, and in 1913 graduated from the high school at Moline, Kansas. The following year he spent as teacher in a rural school near Howard, the next year was...

Biographical Sketch of H. A. McKee

H. A. McKee of Santa Ana, was born in Friendship, Allegany County, New York. At the age of seventeen years he entered the army, enlisting in the Twenty-third New York Volunteer Infantry, and served two years; then for several years he was engaged in the live-stock business in Kansas, and for a few years in merchandising at Wichita; married in Junction City, Kansas, in 1869, to Miss Jennie Paxton, a native of the Buckeye State. She has been a school-teacher; taught her first term in her native State and subsequently in West Virginia, Illinois, Kansas and Texas. Mr. McKee moved to Texas in 1874, and for a period of fifteen years was successfully engaged in the rearing of sheep. In 1888 he came to California and bought a residence near Santa Ana, where he is now enjoying life and expects to spend the remainder of his days. At present he is a partner in a grocery store on Main Street, the firm name being McKee &...

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