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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Descendants of Peter Crapo

Through the greater part of the last century and up to the present writing, the name of Crapo has stood in and about New Bedford as a synonym for useful citizenship. Here have lived during that period Henry Howland Crapo and William W. Crapo, father and son, of whom a recent biographer says: “Among the many citizens of New Bedford and Dartmouth who have achieved high honor, and whose names are held in respect wherever they are known, are Henry H. Crapo and his son William W. Crapo. Born on a Dartmouth farm, from the sterile soil of which his parents could no more than wrest a livelihood, Henry H. Crapo showed his inborn attributes by closing his life in the highest office which the people of the State of Michigan could confer upon him.” And again, “The strong mental as well as physical resemblance of the son to the father is a striking; illustration of Galton’s doctrine of heredity,” this last having especial reference to William W. Crapo. The Crapo family with its allied connections is of original New England stock. (I) Peter Crapaud (Crapo), the progenitor of the family, was a young French lad cast ashore from a wreck off Cape Cod about 1680. His real name is unknown, but he was nicknamed “Crapaud,” the generic designation of a Frenchman. He was “put out” to Francis Combes, an inn-holder, of North Rochester, Mass. On May 31, 1701, he was married to Penelope White, daughter of Samuel White of Rochester, a son of Resolved White, who came to Plymouth in the “Mayflower” with his father, William White, in...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Bloody Scenes in Alabama and Georgia

At this period, some exciting scenes occurred in the region now known as North Alabama. We have already followed a party of emigrants to the Cumberland. Many others flocked to that country, and it soon became well settled, for a wild country. The Upper Creeks and Cherokees continually made war upon these Cumberland people. The French, upon the Wabash, had, for a long time, carried on a commerce, near the sites of the present towns of Tuscumbia and Florence. So long as M. Viez was at the head of this trade, the Cumberland people were not harassed; but, recently, he had been succeeded by others, who supplied the Indians with arms, and encouraged them to attack the American settlements. The latter had only acted upon the defensive, but it was now determined to advance upon the frontier towns of the Indians. June 1 1787: One hundred and thirty men assembled, from different parts of the Cumberland region, and marched, under Colonel James Robertson, to the Tennessee river, piloted by two Chickasaws. David Hays was dispatched from Nashville with boats, laden with provisions, destined for the Muscle Shoals. Descending the Cumberland, he was furiously attacked by the Indians, at the mouth of Duck River, and, after some of his men had been killed and others wounded, he returned to Nashville with his boats. Owing to this the horsemen were without food during the greater part of the expedition. June 1787: Striking the Tennessee at a point very near the present town of Florence, Colonel Robertson concealed his men. A well-beaten path was discovered, leading down the banks, and on the...

Biographical Sketch of E. J. Mathews

Mathews, E. J., Middlebury, was born in Middlebury, Vt., on May 5, 1827. His parents were Eli and Annis (Lothrop) Mathews. Deacon Eli Mathews was born in Stoneham, Mass., on February 16, 1794, and came to Addison county, Vt., with his father, Captain Timothy Mathews, soon after 1800, and first settled in Middlebury village, where Timothy Mathews followed his trade of shoemaking. He was a Revolutionary soldier, and commanded a company from Addison county, Vt., in the War of 1812. He died on September 4. 1857. Eli was a blacksmith by trade, and followed that business in Middlebury village until 1848, when he purchased the place which is now owned by his son, E. J., and which was formerly the old Stowell place. It consists of 138 acres of land, and is now a very fine place. Deacon Eli Mathews was in the War of 1812, and was for many years deacon of the Congregational Church. He never desired public office. He died on October 4, 1864. E. J. Mathews was educated in the common schools, and was brought up to farming on the old place. He was married on March 18, 1850, to Mary Moore, a daughter of Warren Moore, a former and well-known resident of the town of Middlebury, Vt. They have had one son born to them — Charles James, born on October 16, 1855. He is a farmer by occupation, and now conducts the home place. He was married in May, 1880, to Jennie Brooks, and they now have two...

Biographical Sketch of Geo. A. Mathews

Geo. A. Mathews, of the firm of Mathews & Kling, dealers in lumber, grain and machinery, was born in Troy, Walworth County, Wis., in 1843. He was for twelve years engaged in the manufacture of brooms, at Stoughton, Wis. In 1877 he came to Woodbine, Ia., and engaged in present business, with Mr. Kellogg and Mr. Kling. The former sold his interest in the fall of 1881. Mr. M. was married in Troy, Wis. in 1867, to Mary E. Kling. They have two sons and one...

Biographical Sketch of Herbert Mathews

Mathews, Herbert; law and real estate; born, Canada, Nov. 21, 1864; son of Aaron and Caroline (Crabtree) Mathews; educated, public schools and Western Reserve Law School, Cleveland; one of the earliest developers of Lakewood, well-known suburb; one of the original committee of the Chamber of Industry; helped to frame the law establishing a County Park Board; pres. The Cleveland Real Estate Board and Home Exposition; director-general West Side Industrial Exposition; in 1900, organized Rocky River Bank; charter member Phi Delta Phi, Legal Fraternity; member Chamber of Commerce, Chamber of Industry, Hermit, Athletic, and Keswick Golf...

Biographical Sketch of James Mathews

Mathews, James; lawyer; born, Bellwood, Pa., Sept. 4, 1868; educated at Mifflintown; graduated, Princeton University, 1890, degree A. B., Cincinnati Law School, 1893, degree LL. B.; admitted to the bar, and began practice in the United States attorney’s office, in Pittsburgh, Pa., 1893; come to Cleveland in 1894, as attorney for Cleveland, Akron & Columbus R. R.; formed partnership with Senator H. W. Wolcott, continuing until Wolcott was made gen. mgr. Kansas City & Leavenworth Ry.; then with Berkley Pearce, firm name Mathers & Pearce; member Century, Euclid and Hermit Clubs; politically...

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