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Descendants of Francis Brayton of Fall River, MA

BRAYTON. The first in America by this name, one Francis Brayton, came from England to Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where, in 1643, he was received as an inhabitant, in 1655, became a freeman, and to him nearly if not all the Braytons of New England trace their origin. He early entered into the political life of the country, serving as a member of the General Court of Commissioners for the Colony, for many years as member of the Rhode Island General Assembly, and frequently during the later generations his descendants have held positions of responsibility and trust in the public offices of State and the private offices of the business world. The name is found on the rolls of the United States Army and Navy, and on the professional records of the clergy, the physician, and the lawyer. This article, however, is confined to one of the branches of the family several of whose members chose the commercial world for their sphere and through which, during the phenomenal growth of Fall River’s industrial life, the name of Brayton became prominent and influential. In 1714, Preserved Brayton, grandson of Francis, purchased 138 acres of land from William Little, whose father was one of the proprietors of the ShawomeOKt Purchase in Swanzey, Massachusetts. This farm, since known as the Brayton Homestead, borders on the west bank of the Taunton river and is located in the present town of Somerset, which, in 1790, was set apart from Swanzey (now spelled Swansea). Preserved had already married Content Coggeshall, the granddaughter of John Coggeshall, whose name is handed down in history as that of a...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Greeley Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Adair, C. W. Wf. Bertha; ch. Florence, Maxine, Don. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (37.) Anderson, E. H. Wf. Christina; ch. Russell. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 153.91 ac., sec. 5. (20.) Owner, J. F. Mortinson. Artist, Dan’l. Wf. Sarah; ch. Ada, Sadie, George, John, Elmer, Anna, Clara, Madge, Robert. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 2.5; O. 40 ac., sec. 36. Artist, John H. Wf. Mamie; ch. Homer, Hugh, Helen, Margia, John Jr., Amy. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 160 ac., sec. 25. (38.) Anciaux, Ray. Wf. Hazel; ch.Orlyn. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. B. 120 ac., sec. 15. (33.) Owner, Maria Anciaux. Anciaux, V. J. Wf. Hannah; ch. Gentle, Glee, Mary, Dollie, Lydia, Ruth, Iva. P. O. Exira. O. 200 ac., sec. 29. (40.) Avey, C. F. Wf. Marie; ch. May, Wynona, Clarence, Marie, Elsie. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 134.49 ac., sec. 4. (35.) Baier, E. J. Wf. Vera; ch. Edward, Richard. P. O. Exira, R. 1. R. 40 ac., sec. 27; R. 120 ac., sec. 34; R. 30 ac., sec. 33; R. 40 ac., sec. 28. (27.) Owner, John Riley. Bach, Axel. Wf. Ebba; ch. Annie, Helen. P. O. Exira, R. 1. R.120 ac., sec. 25. (2.) Owner, Emil Wiges. Baier, O. C. Wf. Olga; ch. Howard, Dale, Berdell. P. O. Exira. R. 80 ac., sec. 25; R. 88 ac., sec. 28. (26.) Owner, Jacob Hafer. Bauer, J. L.Wf. Emma; ch. Bertha, George, Walter, Melvin....

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence. The community loyalty and neighborly spirit that typifies this locality is our legacy from these early pioneers. Their sweat and toil made possible many luxuries that we of Washington County now enjoy. Their ambition and foresight resulted in far flung civic improvements that are of lasting benefit. SurnameGiven NameMiddle Name/TitleAddressCame FromDate Arrived AdamEffieMrs.WeiserIowaJuly, 1879 AdamsFrancisCambridgeCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsRichardJWeiserCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsVereWeiserNative1890 AdamsonRosaMidvaleKansas1884 AderBerthaMrs.MidvaleAugust, 1881 AderArthurWeiserMissouri1884 AllenClaudeMrs.Weiser1889 AllisonAlexBCambridgeNative1875 AndersonErnmaO. / Mrs.WeiserSweden1887 ApplegateWilliamWeiserOregon1878 BartonBarbaraS. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1882 BartonCarrieMrs.Weiser1882 BartonMollieWeiserNative1885 BeierAmeliaMrs.WeiserUtah1882 BlackDoraMrs.WeiserMontana1888 BoydLillianHague / Mrs.MidvaleNative1881 BradshawWalterWeiserIllinois1884 BranchBS. / Mrs.MidvaleNative BrooksArthurSWeiserNative1873 BuhlThomasCambridge1869 CalwhiteMaeSalingWeiserNative1883 CalwhiteMartinWeiserGermanySept. 1887 CanaryLizzieMrs.WeiserMontana1881 CarpbbellLenaWeiserNative1882 CarrickBertCambridgeKansas1882 ConnellMaryMrs.WeiserIndiana1880 CopeBenWeiserNative1882 CorbettJRWeiserNative1883 CornettOllieJones / Mrs.MidvaleNative1879 CornettIsaacWMidvaleOregon1882 CousensWJWeiserSept. 1882 CowinsLewisWeiserCalifornia1887 CoxAliceMrs.Cambridge1881 CrowellLoraCravenWeiserNative1880 DalyCarrieM. / MrsWeiserOregonApril 1884 DaytonMaryWeiserJerusalem, Idaho1878 DevennyGeoMrs.WeiserNative1884 DickersonL.M. / MrsWeiserBoise1869 DickersonLMWeiserKansas1877 DodgeMaybelleBrooksWeiserNative1868 DonartGeorgeWeiserNative1890 EcclesWilliamHCambridge1886 EdlinLauraWilsonWeiserIllinois1886 ElliottAndrewWeiserOregon1887 EshomEmmaF. / Mrs.WeiserKansas1875 EvansDudleyMidvaleAugust, 1881 EvansJohnMidvaleNative1882 FavreLouisMidvaleOregon1889 GallowayFrancisHWeiserNative1871 GallowayAFWeiserNative1877 GallowayGuyWeiserNative1880 GallowayKatherineWeiserNative1882 GilderoyGeorgeWeiserIllinoisJuly, 1871 GilderoyNA. / AllieWeiserNative1875 GilderoyMaryMrs.WeiserOregon1878 GlascockGeorgeWeiserNative1882 GrayClaraE. / Mrs.WeiserOregonSpring, 1872 GrayThomasWWeiserNativeJuly, 1882 GrimmettWilliamWeiserOregon1883 HagueGeorgeWeiserNative1888 HarrisFrankJudgeWeiserCalifornia1880 HarrisNettieO. / Mrs.WeiserOklahoma1881 HauntzHJWeiserMissouriJuly, 1882 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserUtah1880 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserNative1881 HixonCL. / Dr.WeiserKansas1882 HoffstatterMaryCambridgeNebraska1879 HopkinsLeeAWeiserOhio1889 HopkinsVernonJWeiser1889 HopperRA. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1876 HopperJohnMMidvaleAugust, 1883 HubbardJW. / Mrs.WeiserSept. 1882 HubbardCoraAWeiserIllinois1882 HubbardJWWeiserOregon1886 JacksonAlexWeiserMissouri1890 JonesMaryMrs.Native1872 JonesIda.WeiserKansas1875 JonesAJWeiserMissouri1878 KeithleySAMidvale1876 KeithleySA. / Mrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySarahMrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySeppie.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithlyEffieMrs.Midvale1881 KimballSallieR. / Mrs.WeiserNative1877 KiserCharlesAWeiserColorado1881 KorupFranz.WeiserGermany1888 LaffertyZellaMrs.WeiserNative1884 LanningRebecca.WeiserKansas1891 LedingtonCalvin.MidvaleKansas1883 LedingtonCal.MidvaleKansas1883 LinderMinnieMrsMidvaleUtah1870 LinderThosMMidvaleColoradoSept. 1875 LinderRoseMidvale1877 LinderRoseGrosecloseMidvale1877 MadisonDave.Weiser1880 MartinDoraKelly / Mrs.WeiserNative1876...

Biographical Sketch of John M. Madison

Within the past two years Tuscola has lost many of its oldest and most prominent citizens by death, but in the list none have been more sadly missed or sincerely mourned than our subject, John M. Madison, whose death occurred Monday, July 13, 1896. He was born in Harrison County, Kentucky, May 6, 1823, and was at the time of his death in the seventy-fourth year of his age. He belonged to a family of ten children; one brother and two sisters are still living: H. B. Madison, Tuscola ; Mrs. Harriet Parrish, of Cynthiana, Kentucky; and Mrs. Parmelia Carter, of Washington. On September 22, 1851, our subject married Miss Jennie Rankin, at Cynthiana, a good and noble woman, who preceded him to the grave only a few years. To them were born Harry, Robert and Fannie, all of whom reside in Tuscola, the two former composing the large clothing- house of Harry Madison & Company. In 1854 Mr. and Mrs. Madison came to Charleston, Illinois, where he opened up a store, and in 1860 they removed to Tuscola, where Mr. Madison engaged in the mercantile business, which he continued up to within two years of his death. For many years he conducted the leading general store in Tuscola and by his honesty and straightforward dealing with his fellow men prospered in a gratifying manner. He was a man of unquestioned character and possessed the fullest confidence of all of our people. He and his wife spent the later years of their lives with their daughter, Mrs. Fannie Loose, who made it the purpose of her life to care...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Robert L. Madison

Niniya Jane, daughter of Cyrus and Lydia (Boggan) Cornatzer was born in Deleware District May 22, 1874 and educated in Kansas. Married at Vinita, November 16, 1892, Robert L., son of Isaac Gray and Elizabeth Madison, born October 8, 1861 in Hickory County, Missouri. They are the parents of Lydia, born April 6, 1894; Dabny Lee, born April 28, 1902 and Joseph Farris Madison, born May 22, 1904. Mr. Madison is a farmer and orchardist near Big Cabin. Cyrus Cornatzer, born in Johnson County, Kansas, February 10, 1852, married in March 1870, Lydia Boggan, born in Wadesborough, North Carolina, December 12, 1852. She died September 4, 1899. Cyrus C. Cornatzer lives in Vinita. He was the last Chief the Shawnee Tribe had before...

Biographical Sketch of Edmond H. Madison

Edmond H. Madison, of Wichita, who died while serving his third term in Congress, was of the younger generation of the energetic and able members of the bench and bar in Kansas. He was born at Plymouth, Hancock County, Illinois, December 18, 1865, educated in the common schools and at the age of eighteen years began teaching. In 1885 he went to Wichita, Kansas, where he studied law in the office of G. W. C. Jones; and in 1888 was admitted to the bar. The same year he was elected county attorney of Ford County, which office he held for two terms. On January 1, 1900, he was appointed judge of the Thirty-first Judicial District and served in that capacity until September 17, 1906, when he resigned to enter the race for Congress. He was elected as the representative of the Seventh Congressional District that year, re-elected in 1908 and again in 1910, but died suddenly from apoplexy while seated at the breakfast table on the morning of September 18, 1911, before completing his third term. While in Congress Mr. Madison was a stanch supporter of President Roosevelt’s policies and was a member of the committee to settle the Ballinger-Pinehot eontroversy. He was president of the Kansas League of Republican Clubs in 1896-97, was a active member of the Sons of Veterans; was frequently called upon to serve as delegate to conventions, and his services were in great demand as a campaign...

Madison, Glen – Obituary

Glen Edward Madison, 92, of Clarkston, Wash., died April 3, 2008 at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center. Glen was born near Bartlett Oregon on Grouse Flat. Glen was a WWII Veteran. He was a farmer, musician, fisherman, friend, and father. Glen is survived by his children Randy and Evelyn Madison, Rhonda and Tom Trullinger, Lynda and George Augir, Carol and Wes Promise, Dan Martin, Carl Martin, Diane Martin, and Lori Ann Martin. Glen had 17 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren. A Memorial Service will be held April 12, 2008 at Merchants Funeral Home in Clarkston at 2:00 PM. Memorials can be made to any Veterans or VFW of choice. Wallowa County Chieftain – April 10,...

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government resembling that of the United States. It is a lesser known fact that there was considerably more intermarriage between Cherokees and Whites than any other tribe, so they have a genealogical significance far out of proportion to their historical numbers. There is also a great deal of genealogical data on the Cherokees, mostly in the form of census records and enrollment records. All of which is to point out the abundance of sources available to Emmet Starr when he came to pen his classic History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folklore. Not to diminish Mr. Starr’s contribution in writing about the early Cherokees, their constitution, treaties with the federal government, land transactions, school system, migration and resettlement, committees, councils, and officials, religion, language, and culture, and a host of other topics upon which he writes eloquently, but his stated purpose in writing the History was “to make it as near a personal history and biography of as many Cherokees as possible.” And in fact more than...

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