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The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the first or lower dam was, prior to 1826, a part of Steuben, and was called Narraguagus to distinguish it from the settlement in the southwestern part, which was called “Head of the Bay,” and the post office at Cherryfield was called “Narraguagus” until within some twenty-five years past. What is now the flourishing town of Milbridge was a part of Harrington until 1848. Harrington (No. 5) was incorporated as a town in 1791, Steuben (No. 4) in 1795, Cherryfield (No. 11) in 181G, and the northeast part of Steuben was annexed to Cherryfield in 1826. I find that prior to the incorporation of Harrington, that township and No. 11, Cherryfield, held their plantation meetings and kept their records as one organization. At that time most of the settlers in Harrington lived at Mill River, where the earliest settlement was made. There was no settlement at what is now Harrington village until several years later. I have found it impossible to ascertain the date of the very earliest settlement upon the...

Lovett Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Isaac Lovett, a young Englishman, came to this river with Joseph and Benjamin Wallace. He was clerk and bookkeeper for Major Joseph for several years. He was a fine penman, as shown by the old books that he kept, some of which are yet in existence, and a man of considerable education. He married Annie Sawyer, daughter of John Sawyer of Jonesport. Their children were Daniel, Annie, Rebecca, Ruth, Elizabeth, Jane and Mary.

Leighton Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

About 1760, two brothers, Thomas and Samuel Leighton, came from Falmouth to this River. Samuel settled on the lot now in possession of Richard P. Willey. His sons were Theodore Leighton, Isaac Leighton, Parritt Leighton and Phineas Leighton. Thomas Leighton, the brother of Samuel Leighton, settled upon a lot at the head of Pigeon Hill Bay. He had a family of six sons and five daughters. Robert, Joseph, Thomas, Annie, Molly, James, Ross, Abigail, Betsey, Sarah and Benjamin. Nearly at the same time that Thomas and Samuel Leighton came and settled, Thomas Leighton 2d came from Dover, N. H., to Gouldsboro. His wife was Lydia Tracy. It is not known that there was any relationship between these two Thomas Leightons. From Gouldsboro, Thomas 2d soon removed to Steuben and settled upon the lot afterwards known as the Henry Leighton lot. He had ten children, Jonathan, Mark, Charity, Alexander, Hatevil, Pamelia, Isaiah, Daniel, Israel and Asa.

History of the Methodist Church at Norwich Vermont

Prior to the year 1800, Methodism had scarcely gained a foothold in Vermont. The first Methodist society in the State is said to have been formed at Vershire by Nicholas Suethen in 1796. Two years later, only one hundred church members were returned as residents in the Vershire Circuit, then including the whole of eastern Vermont. Zadock Thompson, in the first edition of his Gazetteer of Vermont, published in 1824, gives the number of preachers, traveling and local, at that time as about one hundred, and the number of societies much greater. Probably no religious body ever made so rapid a growth in the state or the country as did the Methodists during the first twenty-five years of the nineteenth century. Although largely outnumbering every other at the present time, its later rate of increase is comparatively slow. We have no information that fixes the time at which Methodist meetings began to be held in Norwich. The earliest preaching was by circuit preachers, and of these Eleazer Wells and Nathaniel Stearns were among the first. Both of these men had the certificates of their ordination to the ministry (as early as 1810 or 1811) by Bishop McKendree entered upon the town records, and both doubtless labored here more or less about that time. Rev. Amasa Taylor was also here some part of the time about 1813. About 1815, the first church building was erected by the Methodists, a wooden structure of modest dimensions, which stood near the forks of the highway leading from Union Village to Norwich Plain, and about two miles south of the former place. Some members...

Biographical Sketch of Isaac Lovett

Lovett, Isaac, Middlebury, was born in Pittsfield, Rutland county, Vt., on October 24, 1806. His parents were Joseph and Sally (Jepperson) Lovett. Isaac Lovett was educated in the common schools of Warren, Vt., where his family had removed to in 1816. He was brought up to farming and remained at home until he was of age, when he picked up the trade of shoemaking, a trade which he followed at intervals during his life. In 1830 he purchased the place on which he now resides, and which then consisted of forty-three acres; it now contains over ninety acres. He was married on April 20, 1835, to Minerva Cleveland. He then settled in his present home, and has lived there ever since, putting up buildings and improving the same. Mrs. Lovett died in December, 1872. He was married the second time in September, 1874, to Mrs. Edith Stowe, a daughter of Daniel Twichell, who was a former well-known resident of New Haven, Vt. Mrs. Lovett was born in New Haven, Vt., on August 7, 1810. Mr. Lovett is a self-made man, who is esteemed by...

Biographical Sketch of Heman L. Lovett

Lovett, Heman L., Middlebury, was born in Middlebury, Vt., on August 23, 1837. His parents were David and Betsey (Huston) Lovett. David was a son of Joseph and Sally Lovett, and was born in Pittsfield, Rutland county, Vt., on October 10, 1808; was educated in the common schools, and with his brother, Isaac, came to Addison county in 1825, where they engaged in the shoemaking trade; purchased a place together, where he lived with his brother until shortly before his marriage, which occurred in 1835; the residence is now owned by his son, Heman L. After his marriage he bought fifty acres of land, and engaged in shoemaking and blacksmithing. He had a family of one daughter and three sons, all of whom are now living. He was a successful business man, and died on August 30, 1881. Heman L. was educated in the common schools, and was brought up to farming and shoemaking, a trade which he followed during his father’s life. After his father’s death he became owner of the home place. He was married on March 10, 1880, to Sevilla Foster, a daughter of Kendall R. Foster, a well-known resident of Ripton. They have a family of two daughters and one son — Lizzie Agnes, Clara V., and...

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