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Descendants of Nathaniel Newcomb of Norton, MA

Mr. Newcomb was born April 12, 1797, of the sixth generation in descent from Francis Newcomb, who was born probably in Hertfordshire, England, about 1605, and came to America in the ship “Planter” in 1635, accompanied by his wife Rachel, then aged twenty, his daughter Rachel (aged two and a half years) and son John (aged nine months). After residing in Boston three years Francis Newcomb moved his little family to Braintree (now Quincy, Norfolk Co., Mass.), where he died May 27, 1692, his gravestone says “aged one hundred years.” Tradition says he came from Oxfordshire, England, and was of pure Saxon blood. He owned several tracts of land in Braintree. He had ten children.

Descendants of John Paull of Taunton, MA

JOHN PAULL, for over fifty years at the head of the firm of John Paull & Co., hay and grain dealers in Taunton, was throughout that long period a business man of the highest standing, trusted by all who had relations with him. His honorable methods and upright standards were recognized by all his associates. His success evidenced his ability and placed him among the leading men of the community, although he did not identify himself particularly with its affairs outside the field of commerce. The Paull family of which John Paull was a descendant is one of the oldest and best known among the old families of Southeastern Massachusetts. The first of the name in New England, William Paull, was, according to tradition, a native of Scotland, and was a weaver by occupation. He located in Taunton, where he was an early inhabitant, where also was Richard Paull, who was supposed to have been a brother of William. William Paull married Mary Richmond, daughter of John Richmond, of Taunton. He became one of the original proprietors of what was known as “Taunton South Purchase,” which was purchased from the Indians in 1672. He was a large landowner in that territory which in 1712 was incorporated as the town of Dighton, Mass. He died, according to the inscription on tombstone, on Nov. 9, 1704, aged eighty years, while his wife Mary died Oct. 3, 1715, aged seventy-six years. Their children were: James, born April 7, 1657; John, July 10, 1660; Edward, Feb. 7, 1665; Mary, Feb. 8, 1667; Sarah, July 5, 1668; Abigail, May 15, 1673. James Paull, son...

Descendants of Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman of Taunton, MA

CUSHMAN (Taunton family). The Cushman family of Taunton here briefly reviewed, the family and lineage of the late Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman, long one of the leading citizens and substantial men of Taunton, at one time the city’s chief executive officer, and who had served most efficiently in both branches of the city government, as alderman and councilman, and who in turn has been followed by his son, Seth Leonard Cushman, Esq., who for many years has been president of the Bristol County National Bank, is a branch of the family bearing the name of ancient Plymouth, which with its allied connections is one of the historic families of New England. Its progenitor, though of short life in New England, was one of the leading spirits in all the preliminary movements in both England and Holland incident to the coming of the “Mayflower” Pilgrims to New England, where his descendants soon allied themselves with those of the “Mayflower” passengers. There follow in brief some of the incidents in the lives of members of this Taunton family, and in those of their forefathers, in chronological order beginning with Robert Cushman, one of the leaders among the Pilgrims. Robert Cushman, a wool carder of Canterbury, England, married (second) at Leyden, Holland, June 3, 1617, Mary, widow of Thomas Chingleton, of Sandwich, England. He was associated with William Brewster as agent of the Leyden Church in negotiations for removal. He came to New England in the “Fortune” in 1621, bringing with him his only son, Thomas. He returned to England on business of the Colony, and died there in 1626. He left...

Descendants of Frederick Packard of Brockton, MA

FREDERICK PACKARD, late of Brockton, was not only one of the best known men in the line of shoe manufacturing in that city but also one of its most honorable and respected citizens. He ranked among the city’s most successful business men, one whose start in life was obtained by his energy and push, and these traits, combined with excellent business acumen, had long secured for him a position of affluence, and caused the firm of which he had so long been the head to become one of the best known in its line in the country. Mr. Packard was born Dec. 11, 1836, in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), son of the late Josiah and Betsey D. (Bolton) Packard, and was descended from old and sturdy New England ancestry. The following history of his branch of the Packard family is given in chronological order from the American progenitor. Samuel Packard came from Windham, near Hingham, England, with his wife and child in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, in 1638, John Martin, master, there being 133 passengers on board. Samuel Packard settled first in Hingham, Mass., where he was a proprietor in 1638. Later he removed to the West parish of Bridgewater, where the first interior settlement in the State was made. He was constable in 1644, and licensed to keep a tavern in 1670. His will was probated March 3, 1684-85, from which it appears that the Christian name of his wife was Elizabeth. His children were: Elizabeth, Samuel, Jr., Zaccheus, Thomas, John, Nathaniel, Mary, Hannah, Israel, Jael, Deborah and Deliverance. Zaccheus Packard, son of Samuel, married Sarah Howard,...

Descendants of Joseph Borden of Fall River MA

BORDEN (Fall River family – line of Joseph, fourth generation). The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conquerer, and after the battle of Hastings  – in A. D. 1066 – was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where they resided being named Borden. One John Borden, of a later generation, moved to Wales early in the seventeenth century, where his sons Richard and John were married. These sons returned to Borden, in England, and in May, 1635, embarked for America. (I) Richard Borden is found a settler in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1638, in which year he was admitted an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck, and in that same year was allotted five acres of land. He figured in the surveying and platting of the lands thereabout in 1639, and in the year following was one of those appointed to lay out the lands in Porstmouth, R. I. He was assistant in 1653 and 1654; general treasurer in 1654-55; commissioner in 1654-55-56-57; and deputy in 1667 and 1670. He bought land in Providence in 1661, and not far from 1667 became one of the original purchasers of land in New Jersey from the Indians. He...

Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below; Anna Reynolds, born Nov. 11, 1822, married Theodore Lilley, of North Bridgewater, and died Jan. 28, 1882; Rhoda Perkins, born Oct. 28, 1830, married Barnabas H. Gray, of Kingston, Mass.; Sanford, born Nov. 25, 1833, died in Boston, though he lived at Louisville, Ky., where he was engaged in the shoe business, and where he married Maggie J. Harvey. Charles Keith, the father, died July 29, 1859, and the mother passed away April 22, 1863. Naturally of a “bookish” turn of mind, outdoor occupations had little attraction for Mr. Keith, and in the gratification of his tastes and inclinations farming pursuits were neglected for the less severe physical occupation of the shop. In his younger days he was evidently quite an athlete, for it is related that at the “raising” of Sprague’s Mill, Factory Village, a wrestling match was planned for the occasion, and that he was pitted against several, all of whom he overcame, when, as a last resort, Lieut. Israel Packard was brought forward to contend for the honors; after a protracted struggle he, too, was...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Contributions of the Old Residents’ Historical Association, Lowell MA

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 6 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were continued by the contributions by the Lowell Historical Society. Volume I A Fragment, written in 1843, by Theodore Edson Boott, Kirk, by Theodore Edson Carpet-Weaving and the Lowell Manufacturing Company, by Samuel Fay Dana, Samuel L., Memoir of, by John O. Green Early Recollections of an Old Resident, by Josiah B. French East Chelmsford (now Lowell), Families Living in, in 1802, by Z. E. Stone Green, Benjamin, Biography of, by Lewis Green Hale, Moses, Early Manufacturer of Wool, &c., in E. Chelmsford, by Alfred Gilman History of an Old Firm, by Charles Hovey Jackson, General, in Lowell, by Z. E. Stone Jackson, Patrick T., by John A. Lowell Knapp, Daniel, Autobiography of Letters (Three) of Samuel Batchelder First Census of Lowell; the Hamilton Manufacturing Company; first Manufacture of the Power-Loom Drilling Letters (Three) of Samuel Lawrence John Brown; Milton D. Whipple; the Purchase of the Outlets of the N. H. Lakes, the sources of the Merrimack Lewis, Joel, Reminiscences of, by Joshua Merrill Livingston, William, by Josiah B. French Locke, Joseph, Life and Character of, by John A. Knowles Lowell and Harvard College, by John O. Green Contains a list of alumni and graduates of Harvard University, now or formerly residing in Lowell. July 1877. Lowell and the Monadnocks, by Ephraim Brown Lowell and Newburyport, by Thomas B. Lawson Lowell, Francis Cabot, by Alfred Gilman Lowell Institution for Savings, Semi-Centennial History of, by Geo. J. Carney Lowell, Mayors of...

Lincoln Family of Hingham and Taunton, Massachusetts

From the pioneer days at the settlement at Hingham and Taunton the Lincoln family has been a continuous one in that region of Massachusetts; one of prominence in the start, it has maintained itself both here and in the country at large and in both has long since become numerous. It has been claimed by the late Hon. Solomon Lincoln that all the Lincolns in Massachusetts are descendants of the Lincolns who settled in Hingham in 1636 and 1638. He says: “We have evidence of authentic records that the early settlers of Hingham of the name of Lincoln were four, bearing the name of Thomas, distinguished from each other by their occupations, as miller, weaver, cooper and husbandman; Stephen (brother of the husbandman); Daniel, and Samuel (brother of the weaver).” He adds “our claim is that the early settlers of Hingham above enumerated were the progenitors of all the Lincolns of the country. From Hingham the Lincolns trace their early home to Norfolk County, England.”

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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