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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Biographical Sketch of John John Kinney

Kinney was born March 31, 1853, near Lawrence, Kansas, son of Denny Kinney, a full-blood Cherokee. John attended public school till 1865 and in 1867 moved to the Cherokee Nation. For the first year John did little more than enjoy himself hunting and riding around, after which he began farming. In 1875 he commenced learning the carpenter’s trade, which trade he still continues, in connection with farming. Mr. Kinney married Miss Niday, February 14, 1888. She is the daughter of Jacob Niday, a white man. Mr. Kinney has 60 acres of farm in cultivation, a good, comfortable residence, four head of horses and a stock of hogs. He does considerable business at his trade. Mr. Kinney is above the middle height, and is a man of intelligence and good, practical education. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and looked upon as a good, charitable Christian, and is very...

Edith Morris Todd Kinney McFee

KINNEY MCFEE, Edith Morris Todd10, (Robert B.9, Joshua M.8, Eli M.7, Eli6, Jonah5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) was twice married, first, to Adelbert T. Kinney, second, Wilton A. McFee. Child by Wilton A. McFee: I....

Biography of Robert Couch Kinney

ROBERT COUCH KINNEY. – Oregon will always treasure with respect and admiration the memory of the men and women who came in the days when the Pacific Northwest was the home of savage tribes, mountain men and a few traders, to plant homes and lay the foundation of an empire on the waters of the Columbia. They dared much when they accepted the roll of pioneers to the Pacific. Some became notable for success, and developed character that gave standing to the new state; for the constitution and early legislation of Oregon showed statesmanship seldom equaled in the erection of a commonwealth. Among those who preceded the gold excitement was Robert Couch Kinney, who illustrates the capacity of a new country to develop character and insure success. He was the son of a pioneer and nephew of another who went in early days to Illinois and inherited qualities necessary to success in a new country. Mr. Kinney was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, July 4, 1813. At the age of twenty-five he married Eliza Lee Bigelow, who survives him, and moved to Burlington, Iowa. He went boating and afterwards ran steamboats on the Mississippi with success, then conceived the idea of founding a city, and located and helped build Bloomington, now the prosperous city of Muscatine, Iowa. He engaged there in milling, and acquired a knowledge of that business which he afterwards put to good use in Oregon. Early circumstances had not been favorable to education above the grade of the common schools; and circumstances here favored him. By arrangement with his partner he was off duty half...

Biography of Samuel Kinney

SAMUEL KINNEY. – Samuel Kinney, a brother of Robert C. Kinney, was one of the founders of our early society in Oregon, and a man of unusual force and of marked worth. He was born in 1810 in the State of Illinois. He was brought up on a farm, acquiring nerve and muscle and an intrepid spirit, and gained the education of the times in his native district. He was early married to Miss Ann Maria Porter, who was also a native of Illinois, where she was born in 1814. Soon after his marriage, about 1832, he removed to Iowa, locating at Bloomington, now Muscatine, a city founded by his brother Robert. Here he was engaged for a time in teaming, and also with his brother in operating Vanetta & Deshler’s sawmill. His wife’s health being poor, however, and being himself possessed of an enterprising and adventurous spirit, he determined to find a new home in Oregon, and in 1847 made the trip across the plains. Little difficulty was experiences on the journey; and there was no trouble from the Indians except that near the Umatilla the Cayuses were found to be impudent, among other things making request to buy some of the girls, and even threatening to steal them. One saucy fellow went so far as to ride up and seize the eldest daughter in order to drag her from her horse, and appropriate her. Mr. Kinney, however, was on the spot instantly, and with his whip-stalk knocked the Indian from his horse into the dust. The emigrants – the train was now divided off from forty to...

Biography of Kinney, Asa, Hon.

Kinney, Asa Hon. The parents of Mr. Kinney were Abel and Freelove Kinney, of Cortland County, N Y.; their place of nativity being New London, Conn. They were among the early settlers of Cortland County, N. Y., and the father was a man of influence and prominence. His grandparents were of revolutionary stock, having served their country in the struggle for liberty. Asa Kinney was the fourth son of the family, and was born at Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., May 21, 1810. He received a common school education; was also noted as a debater when a young man. He resided in Homer, N. Y., Preston City, Conn., and Cattaraugus County, N. Y. Previous to coming West, he went to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1836, and settled at Oak Creek on the 5th of July of the same year, where he followed farming. Previous to coming West he had been identified with several town offices, and was promoted Lieutenant Colonel of his regiment in New York. He was one of the first Justices of the Peace in Milwaukee County; was a member of the last Territorial Legislature of Wisconsin, and he was elected as a Representative from Milwaukee County to the Constitutional Convention of 1846, and served on the committee on the organization and affairs of counties and towns, and their powers and duties. He was noted for good, solid sense, but not for speech making. He served in the State Senate in the sessions of 1848 and 1849. In 1852 he went to California and was a member of the Legislature of that State State (sic) Senate in the...

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