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Descendants of John Paull of Taunton, MA

JOHN PAULL, for over fifty years at the head of the firm of John Paull & Co., hay and grain dealers in Taunton, was throughout that long period a business man of the highest standing, trusted by all who had relations with him. His honorable methods and upright standards were recognized by all his associates. His success evidenced his ability and placed him among the leading men of the community, although he did not identify himself particularly with its affairs outside the field of commerce. The Paull family of which John Paull was a descendant is one of the oldest and best known among the old families of Southeastern Massachusetts. The first of the name in New England, William Paull, was, according to tradition, a native of Scotland, and was a weaver by occupation. He located in Taunton, where he was an early inhabitant, where also was Richard Paull, who was supposed to have been a brother of William. William Paull married Mary Richmond, daughter of John Richmond, of Taunton. He became one of the original proprietors of what was known as “Taunton South Purchase,” which was purchased from the Indians in 1672. He was a large landowner in that territory which in 1712 was incorporated as the town of Dighton, Mass. He died, according to the inscription on tombstone, on Nov. 9, 1704, aged eighty years, while his wife Mary died Oct. 3, 1715, aged seventy-six years. Their children were: James, born April 7, 1657; John, July 10, 1660; Edward, Feb. 7, 1665; Mary, Feb. 8, 1667; Sarah, July 5, 1668; Abigail, May 15, 1673. James Paull, son...

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War,1 “when we had not a correct knowledge of the location of the Creek Indians nor of the features of the country.” This situation produced much unhappiness and contention between the people of the two tribes. The Indians had other grievances, and the Creeks took the lead in calling the attention of the officials to their needs by the preparation of a memorial in which they complained of frequent attacks upon them by bands of wild Indians from the south and west of their location. They asked the Government to appoint a commission to meet with them for the redress of their wrongs, and to call a council of the different tribes for the adoption of measures to establish peace and security in their new home. The Creek memorial and a long report by the Secretary of War on February 16, 1832, were transmitted to Congress by President Jackson,2 who recommended that three commissioners be appointed as requested in the memorial, and recommended by the Secretary. It appeared from the report of the Secretary of War that there were then west of the Mississippi twenty-five hundred Creeks, six thousand Choctaw, thirty-five hundred Cherokee and...

Indians in Mason County Michigan 1880 Census

These 355 people were identified as Indians (I) in column 4 (color) of the 1880 census for Mason County Michigan. In order to have been enumerated they are believed to either have renounced tribal rule, and under state law, exercised their rights as citizens; or because they “mingled” with the white population of these Michigan towns were enumerated under the expanded definitions.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Muster Roll of Captain Daniel W. Clark’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Daniel W. Clark’s Company of Infantry, in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Calais, Maine to the fifth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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