Johnson Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Historical Sketches of Bluehill Maine

Family genealogy of Moses Johnson and Robert Johnson, both sons of Obed Johnson and Joanna Wood, who resided in Blue Hill, Maine and each raised large families.



Ewer Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Historical Sketches of Bluehill Maine

Robert P. Ewer married, Sept. 5, 1839, Nancy Fisher, daughter of Joseph W. and Sally (Grindle) Johnson. She was born May 4, 1818. They had children as follows: Sarah, Mary, Lewis, Harriet and Franklin.



Mitchell Valley Cemetery, Mitchell, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

Rebecca Mitchell Proctor Grave Marker

Transcription of Mitchell Valley Cemetery in Mitchell, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska.



High Butte Cemetery, McGrew, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

Rebecca Mitchell Proctor Grave Marker

Transcription of the High Butte Cemetery in McGrew, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska



Creighton Valley Cemetery, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

Rebecca Mitchell Proctor Grave Marker

Transcription of Creighton Valley Cemetery in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska.



Caldwell Cemetery, Scotts Bluff County Nebraska

Rebecca Mitchell Proctor Grave Marker

Transcription for Caldwell Cemetery in Scotts Bluff County Nebraska.



Biographies of Western Nebraska

History of Western Nebraska and its People

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the



Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Title page to the Munro Family. Click on book image to read book. Must be "checked out" first.

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.



Wood Genealogy of Bluehill, Maine

Historical Sketches of Bluehill Maine

Capt. Joseph Wood was an early settler in Blue Hill arriving in 1763 with some of his sons: Israel, Joseph and Robert. Across the road from the schoolhouse is the cellar over which it is said the house of which he built stood, when he removed from the island at the Fore Falls.



Sir William Johnson and the Six Nations

Sir William Johnson and the Six Nations

The Mohawk Valley in which Sir William Johnson spent his adult life (1738-17 74) was the fairest portion of the domain of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. In this valley William Griffis had lived nine years, seeing on every side traces or monuments of the industry, humanity, and powerful personality of its most famous resident in colonial days. From the quaint stone church in Schenectady which Sir Johnson built, and in whose canopied pews he sat, daily before his eyes, to the autograph papers in possession of his neighbors; from sites close at hand and traditionally associated with the lord of Johnson Hall, to the historical relics which multiply at Johnstown, Canajoharie, and westward, — mementos of the baronet were never lacking. His two baronial halls still stand near the Mohawk. Local traditions, while in the main generous to Johnson’s memory, was sometimes unfair and even cruel. The hatreds engendered by the partisan features of the Revolution, and the just detestation of the savage atrocities of Tories and red allies led by Johnson’s son and son-in-law, had done injustice to the great man himself. Yet base and baseless tradition was in no whit more unjust than the sectional opinions and hostile gossip of the New England militia which historians have so freely transferred to their pages.



Newsletter Signup

We currently provide two newsletters. Why not take both for a run?

Genealogy Update: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new, or significantly updated, collection or database on our website.

Circle of Nations: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new (or significantly updated) Native American collection or database on our website.

Once you've clicked on the Subscribe button above you'll receive an email from us requesting confirmation. You must confirm the email before you will be able to receive any newsletter.

Connect With Us!

Pin It on Pinterest