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Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

Murdock Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Thomas Murdock removed to Norwich from Preston, Connecticut, as early as 1767 (in which year he was recorded a voter in town), and located on the farm a little north of Norwich Plain and subsequently occupied by Jared Goodell, George Blanchard, Harvey Knights, and now by Judd Leonard. He married Elizabeth Hatch (sister of John and Joseph Hatch, early settlers in Norwich), to whom were born: Asahel, Constant, Jasper, Thomas, Jr., Anna, who became the wife of Ebenezer Brown, Esq., the first lawyer to locate in Norwich, and Margaret, who married Elisha Partridge, November 14, 1765. Mr. Murdock was prominent in both state and local matters, the offices held by him being noticed in other chapters of this book. He died Dec. 5, 1803, followed by his wife in 1814. Asahel, the eldest son, was a voter in Norwich as early as 1782. He married Elizabeth Starkweather in 1779, and they became the parents of six children. He returned to Connecticut in 1800. Constant was a voter in Norwich as early as 1784. By his first wife, Sarah Jewett, he had one child, and by his second wife, Lucy Riley, he had eight children. His home was in the fine residence now occupied by Albert Davis, on the hill a little north of Norwich village. He died in Norwich in 1828, aged 67 years. His first wife died in 1790, aged 22 years, and his second wife in 1825, aged 48 years. Jasper was born October 5, 1759. It is likely that he came to Norwich with his father. He erected at Norwich Plain an elegant private residence...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biography of E.R. Jewett

JEWETT, E. R. Willow Lawn is in some respects the handsomest estate in Buffalo. It lies on Main Street, near the railroad over which the Belt Line trains conveniently run at short intervals. Its grounds stretch back through acres of farm land to the City Park. The finest half-mile avenue in the city limits for pleasure driving sweeps down past the place and merges into the park roads. The house, lacking the pretensions of many a more modern and expensive city residence, is large, roomy, and has an unmistakable air of comfort and convenience. The long path that leads up to it from the street crosses a lawn well set with trees and shrubs. The chief pride of the lawn, however, the cherished object which has given the estate its pleasant name, is a willow tree. Its great trunk, six feet in diameter and nineteen in circumference, divides, a dozen feet or so above the ground, into many huge branches. A simple seat encircles the tree. It is probably the largest tree in Buffalo; nor do we know of any so large within many miles of Buffalo. It is not the only large willow at Willow Lawn, but it dwarfs its companions. Who planted it is not known. The legend lives that around the tree the Senecas used to gather. Beyond that its history must be supplied by the imagination. Willow Lawn is the home of Mr. Elam R. Jewett. He was a pioneer of the printing and publishing business in Buffalo; has for almost half a century been one of Buffalo’s leading citizens; and there is none to-day...

Jewett, Helen M. – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Helen M. Jewett, 93, of La Grande, died Aug. 17 at Grande Ronde Hospital. A memorial service will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday at Cove Christian Camp. Helen was born June 22, 1914, to Harold and Thena Mae Moak Fry in Montesano, Wash. Helen spent most of her childhood on a ranch on the Wynooche River near Montesano, with a brief time spent in Alberta, Canada. She attended a one-room school, and graduated high school in Montesano. She attended Eugene Bible College (now called Northwest Christian College) in Eugene. She and her husband, Joe, ministered during college at the Christian Church in Florence. They traveled to Enid, Okla., for Joe’s graduate studies where their daughter, Joanne, was born. Two years later, their twins, Doris and Robert, were born. Back in Oregon, they began a five-year ministry at Milton-Freewater Christian Church on Pearl Harbor Day. In 1946, they moved to Heppner and ministered for two years at the Christian church. In 1948, the family moved to Baker, where they ministered for 21 years at the Baker First Christian Church. Their final years of ministry before retirement were at the Enterprise Christian Church. Helen was active in the church, teaching Bible classes, working as church secretary, and teaching and directing youth camps. She was the main cook at Cove Christian Camp for many years. Helen and Joe were considered one of the driving forces for Cove Christian Camp. During retirement, Helen managed Red’s Horse Ranch for a summer with her husband, then spent two summers at Minam Lodge. Helen loved being in the mountains, and was able to...

Biography of Mrs. Harriet Jewett

MRS. HARRIET JEWETT.- A mournful personal as well as historic interest lingers about those who survived the dreadful affair at Waiilatpu in 1847. Many of these feel that those who died were the happier; and no sympathetic friend, as every reader of this book must be, will care to inquire more minutely than is given in the pages of the general history of this work. But all will be glad that these sufferers from Indian atrocity outlived their great sorrow, – the butchering of a husband or father or friend, – and have for all these years been useful and contented citizens. Mrs. Jewett was born in Lower Canada in 1809, and at the age of twenty moved with her parents to the United States, where she was soon married to Nathan Kimball. The young couple removed to Indiana, and in 1847 joined a company bound for Oregon. Mr. Kimball was ambitious, a good mechanic, and had considerable money. Purchasing an excellent outfit, two ox-teams, milk cows, and clothing for two years, the journey was undertaken with high hopes and good cheer. What extra money was on hand was sewed up in belts, and worn by the older members of the family. On the journey misfortune overtook the family (there were seven children) in the death of a girl of three and a boy of fourteen. On no place than the plains is death more gloomy. The loved ones must be buried and left. The graves must be guarded against the prowling of wolves on the scent of blood, and of Indians ready to rifle even the dead of...

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