Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Biography of John W. Jacks

The value of the local newspaper in the upbuilding of the best interests of any community is universally conceded. The rule is that good papers are found in good towns, inferior journals in towns of stunted growth and uncertain future. It is not so much a matter of size as excellence and of adaptability to the needs of its locality. These conditions given, in an appreciative and progressive community, the size of the paper will take care of itself in a way mutually satisfactory to publishers and patrons. Montgomery City is fortunate in having the Standard as its local instrument. This paper is owned, edited and published by John W. Jacks and is conducted upon only the highest and most honorable principles. John W. Jacks was born five miles north of Paris, in Monroe county, Missouri, on the 1st of September, 1845, a son of John Richmond Jacks. His father was born to Kentucky in 1815 and came with his parents to Missouri when twelve years of age. The first pair of shoes John R. Jacks ever owned he made himself. In Missouri he engaged in farming and the mercantile business and was a prominent man in the community in which he resided. He was the first marshal of the Court of Common Pleas of Sturgeon, Boone county, and was a man of the highest integrity and personal worth. His father was William Milton Jacks, a native of North Carolina, who married Miss Nancy White in Kentucky and moved to Missouri in 1827. The mother of John W. Jacks was Sarah Keithley. She was born in Pike county, a...

Pin It on Pinterest