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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War,1 “when we had not a correct knowledge of the location of the Creek Indians nor of the features of the country.” This situation produced much unhappiness and contention between the people of the two tribes. The Indians had other grievances, and the Creeks took the lead in calling the attention of the officials to their needs by the preparation of a memorial in which they complained of frequent attacks upon them by bands of wild Indians from the south and west of their location. They asked the Government to appoint a commission to meet with them for the redress of their wrongs, and to call a council of the different tribes for the adoption of measures to establish peace and security in their new home. The Creek memorial and a long report by the Secretary of War on February 16, 1832, were transmitted to Congress by President Jackson,2 who recommended that three commissioners be appointed as requested in the memorial, and recommended by the Secretary. It appeared from the report of the Secretary of War that there were then west of the Mississippi twenty-five hundred Creeks, six thousand Choctaw, thirty-five hundred Cherokee and...

Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors.1 French Influence in Arkansas One of the first of the French traders up the Arkansas whose name has been recorded was Joseph Bogy, an early resident of the old French town, Arkansas Post, from which point he traded with the Osage Indians in the vicinity of the Three Forks. On one of his expeditions he had ascended the Arkansas with a boatload of merchandise, to trade to the Osage near the mouth of the Verdigris. There on the seventh of January, 1807, he was attacked and robbed of all his goods by a large band of Choctaw Indians under the famous chief, Pushmataha.2 When charged with the offense, Pushmataha admitted it and justified the robbery on the ground that they were at war with the Osage, against whom they were proceeding at the time; and that as Bogy was trading with their enemies, he was a proper subject for reprisal. Bogy laid a claim before the Government for nine thousand dollars damages against the Choctaw, based on the protection guaranteed by his trader’s license. This claim was pending until after 1835, before it was allowed. Among the interesting papers in connection with the claim, is Bogy’s report of having met on...

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Business Men of Northern Maine

The Northern Maine, its Points of Interest and its Representative Business Men manuscript provides historical sketches of the nine towns featured within it’s embrace, as well as biographical sketches of the businesses and the men and women who owned and ran those businesses found within the towns of Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou, Ft. Fairfield, Danforth, Lincoln, Mattawamkeag, Winn, and Kingman.

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biography of Alexander M. Irving

Alexander M. Irving was born in Chambersburg, Pike county, Illinois, January 16, 1842. He attended the common schools of his native place and thus acquired the foundation for his present educational advantages. When he had reached the age of sixteen, his father died and he was compelled to earn his own living and assist his mother, and was engaged in work upon the farm until the mutterings of coming war spread over the land in 1861, when he espoused the cause of the Union, and enlisted in Company H, Ninety-ninth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in August of the year last mentioned, and served three years. He went to Harrison county, Missouri, during the fall of 1864, taught school the following winter and came to Gallatin in April, 1865, and engaged in the business of manufactaring wagons in company with his brother, until the summer of 1866. Next he engaged in the insurance business, continuing in said business until the fall of 1869, then went to work in the hardware store of A. D. Brown, continuing in that until the fall of 1870, when he entered in the drug business with C. C. Gillilan and did a thriving business until the fall of 1872, under the name of Gillilan & Irving. Retiring from the firm he served as deputy sheriff under James T. Dunn during 1873 and 1874, and then as deputy circuit clerk until the spring of 1875, under A. F. McFarland, when he again engaged in the drug business at his old stand with D. F. Long under the firm name of Long & Irving. In the...

Slave Narrative of Charles Lee Dalton

Interviewer: Miss Nancy Woodburn Watkins Person Interviewed: Charles Lee Dalton Location: Madison, North Carolina Age: 93 Ex-Slave Biography–Charles Lee Dalton, 93. In July, 1934, the census taker went to the home of Unka Challilee Dalton and found that soft talking old darky on the porch of his several roomed house, a few hundred feet south of the dirt road locally called the Ayersville road because it branches from the hard surfaced highway to Mayodan at Anderson Scales’ store, a short distance from Unka Challilie’s. Black got its meaning from his face, even his lips were black, but his hair was whitening. His lean body was reclining while the white cased pillows of his night bed sunned on a chair. His granddaughter kept house for him the census taker learned. Unka Challilie said: “I’se got so I ain’t no count fuh nuthin. I wuz uh takin’ me a nap uh sleepin’ (‘ AM). Dem merry-go-wheels keep up sich a racket all nite, sech a racket all nite, ah cyan’t sleep.” This disturbance was “The Red Wolfe Medicine Troop of Players and Wheels” near Anderson Scales’ store in the forks of the Mayodan and the Ayresville roads. In 1937 in the home of his son, Unka Challilie ninety-three, told the cause of his no “countness.” “I wuz clean-up man in de mill in Mayodan ontill three years ago, I got too trimbly to git amongst de machinery. Daze frade I’d fall and git cut.” I cum tuh Madison forty-five yeah ago, and I bought one acre, and built me a house on it, an’ razed my leben chillun dyah. My wife...

Biography of Andrew Irving

Andrew Irving, the pioneer school teacher in what is now the town of Pembroke, and registrar of the county of Renfrew since 1866, is a native of the Province of New Brunswick, his birth being dated at Miramichi, December 14, 1820. His father, Andrew Irving, senior, a second cousin of the celebrated Edward Irving, was born in the parish of Middlebee Dumfriesshire, Scotland; came to New Brunswick in 181; was a farmer many years at Miramichi, and died in 1864. His mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Henderson, also a native of Dumfriesshire, came to this country in 1820, and died in 1871. Her grandfather John Henderson, owned Cleugh Brae. He married Clarinda Douglas, the daughter of Sir Archibald Douglas, of Castle Milk, and had the Cleugh-Brae farm presented to him by Sir Archibald on the day of the marriage. He died at the age of about fifty-five years. His will was made only eight days before his death, and was declared by the courts to be illegal. It appears by the laws of Scotland that the testator must attend both kirk and market after the making of his will, and be alive six weeks. When the eldest son, Dr. John Henderson, arrived, home from Antigua, in search of health, he discovered the mistake about the will, and commenced a suit to break it, and enter upon the possession of the estate himself, which was eventually sold and eaten almost wholly up in costs, each of the family receiving only one hundred pounds. The Doctor died about a month after the sale of the estate so he did not...

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