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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel. Woven in the narratives of it’s people, however, is the story of Colorado. Initial expeditions by European settlers in this area were for trade with the Natives or as a throughfare to California further west. It wasn’t until one of those wagon trains came a man name of Ralston and he dipped his pan into a creek which would later bare his name and pulled out a troy ounce of gold, worth $5 at the time. A decade later, and other miners began to claim the land in the eastern Colorado area. Pushing ever westward in search of the golden dust they eventually found their way into western Coloado. Some of these miners would eventually settle in the area of their mines and became Colorado’s first residents. Some would have their claim luck out and would stay taking up other responsibilities such as ranching, politics, merchandising, etc. In these people’s lives became the story of Colorado – so while this volume is comprised almost solely of biographies, it is also comprised of the history of early Western Colorado. Click on the page number to view the biography. SurnameGivenMiddleView Bio BurgerFrankMPage 17 TaylorEdwardTPage 18 ZerbeAllenLPage 21 VeatchWilliamLPage 23 HarpHoraceSPage 24 GeorgeAlfredPage 25 BrownHoraceGPage 26 HeatonWilliamVPage 27 ThompsonBenjaminHPage 28 WatsonBenjaminKPage 29 SherwoodBenjaminPage 30 DicksonAmosJPage...

Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is believed that the history of one party of these emigrants will enable the reader to understand what kind of hardships and deprivations all the others were forced to undergo. Major General Phineas Lyman, a native of Durham, a graduate of Yale, a distinguished lawyer, and a member of the legislature of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, became commander of the Connecticut forces in 1755. He served with so much distinction, during the Canadian war, that he was invited, by persons high in office, to visit England. He had formed an association composed of his brothers in arms, called the “Military Adventurers,” whose design was, the colonization of a tract of country upon the Mississippi. He sailed to England, as agent for this company, with the sanguine, yet reasonable hope, that the King would make the grant. Arriving there he found, to his astonishment, that land in a wilderness was refused to those who had fought so valiantly for it, and whose contemplated establishment would have formed a barrier against enemies, who might seek to acquire it. In his own country Lyman had never solicited favor, otherwise than by faithful public services. The coolness which he now experienced deeply mortified him — his spirits sank, and he lost all his former energy. Shocked at the degradation...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Slave Narrative of Patsy Hyde

Person Interviewed: Patsy Hyde Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Residence: 504 9th Avenue N., Nashville, Tennessee “Dunno how ole I ez. I wuz bawn in slavery en b’longs ter de Brown family. Mah Missis wuz Missis Jean R. Brown en she wuz kin ter Abraham Lincoln en I useter y’ar dem talkin’ ’bout ‘im livin’ in a log cabin en w’en he d’ed she had her house draped in black. Marster Brown wuz also good ter his slaves. De Missis promus Marster Brown on his de’th bed nebber ter let us be whup’d en she kep her wud. Sum ob de oberseers on urthur plantations would tie de slaves ter a stake en gib dem a good whup’in fer sump’in dey ought not ter done.” “All cul’ed people wore cotton goods en de younger boys run ’round in der shurt tails. Mah Missis nit all de white chilluns stockin’ en she made me sum. I had ter hold de yarn on mah hans w’en she wuz nittin’. I members one time I wuz keepin’ flies off de table usin’ a bunch ob peacock feathers en I went ter sleep standin’ up en she tole me ter go back ter de kitchen.” “I went en finish mah nap.” “One day ole Uncle Elick woke Marster Brown fum his atter-noon nap tellin’ ‘im dat de prettiest men dat I ever seed wuz passin’ by on de road. He went ter de winder en said, “Good Gawd, hit’s dem damn Yankees.” Mah white folks had a pretty yard en gyarden. Soldiers kum en camped dere. I’d slip ter de winder en lissen...

Biographical Sketch of C. L. Hyde

C.L. Hyde, clerk of the courts, was born in Otsego County, N.Y., in 1843; came to Ia. in 1866, and first located at Little Sioux, Harrison County; has been a resident of the county ever since. He was elected to his present office in 1876 on the republican ticket. He enlisted in 1862 in the 20th Wis. Inft.; was discharged after seven months, and then joined the 41st Wis. Inft. He married Mary Russell, and has three...

Biographical Sketch of Daniel Hyde

Daniel Hyde came in from Claverack, Columbia county, in 1801, and settled two and one-half miles north of Afton, at what is known as Ayrshire or North Afton, on the farm now occupied by Edward Wilkinson, where he died. His children were: Edward, who married Lydia, daughter of Nathan Bateman, and settled in the same locality, and who afterwards removed to Masonville and died there; Daniel, who married a woman named Graham, and settled in Ashtabula county, Ohio, where he died; Chauncey G., who married Lucretia, daughter of Amasa Newton, and settled and died near the old homestead; Elijah, who married Jemima, daughter of Amasa Newton, and also settled and died near the homestead; Sophia, who married a man named Martin, and removed with him to Paris, Canada, and died there; Polly, who married Leighton Joyce, and settled in Greene county, and died in Brooklyn; Cynthia, who married Dr. Archibald Welch, and settled and died in New Haven, Conn.; and Olive, who married Wells Newton, and settled in Bainbridge and died there. The grandchildren living in the county are: A. C. Hyde, only child of Chauncey G., a druggist in Afton; and Daniel A., Rosanna, wife of Jas. M. Olendorf, William E., Lodosca, wife of George Knight, Chauncey G., and Harriet, wife of Justus Carr, children of Elijah, also in...

Biography of Albert A. Hyde

Albert A. Hyde. A native of Champaign County and one who has spent his entire life within its borders, watching its development throughout the years of its greatest growth, Albert A. Hyde is so well known to the citizens of this great agricultural center that it may seem supererogatory to give his record in detail in a work of this kind. On the other hand, Mr. Hyde is one of those who have helped to make history in the county. He has not merely been a witness to progress he has also been a participant in the movements which have made for the same, and his record of citizenship is also worthy of note. Albert A. Hyde was born November 7, 1856, in Champaign County, Illinois, the third in a family of six children born to Adolphus W. and Sophia H. (Choate) Hyde. Of these children five are living: Elizabeth, who is the wife of G. E. Durbin, an agriculturist in the vicinity of Backus, Minnesota; Peoria, who is the widow of Joseph L. Neal, also resides at Backus; Albert A., of this review; Carrie A., who is the wife of J. H. Abbott, a retired farmer of Lincoln, Illinois; and Adolphus Bruce, a prosperous farmer and miller of East Bend Township. The father of these children was born in Switzerland County, Indiana, February 16, 1835, and in his youth learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, which he had mastered before coming to this State in young manhood. In Illinois he was married, but returned to Indiana and spent four years in the Hoosier State, then coming back...

Biographical Sketch of Walker F. Hyde

Hyde, Walker F.; building contractor; born, England, Oct. 12, 1866; son of James Butler and Elizabeth Love Hyde; educated, public schools of England, graduated from Ardingly College, Eng.; married, Cleveland, May 3, 1897, Mary B. Markham; issue, four children; at the age of eighteen after leaving college assisted his father, who was in the general contracting business in England; came to America in 1898, and started work as a carpenter; has been associated with several large firms as foreman and supt.; organized the firm of W. F. Hyde Co., in 1909; pres. and gen. mgr. the firm has had a rapid business growth, handling large contracts in the city and other...

Biographical Sketch of Edward Pechior Hyde

Hyde, Edward Pechior; physicist; born, Baltimore, Md., Jan. 3, 1879; son of Edward Ingle and Caroline Clemm Hyde; educated, public schools, Baltimore City, Md., A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1900; fellow and fellow by courtesy, Johns Hopkins University, 1900-1906; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, February, 1906; married, Baltimore, Md., May 4, 1904, Virginia Getzendenner; one daughter, Dorothy Virginia, born Aug. 25, 1906; physicist, director the physical laboratory National Electric Lamp Ass’n, 1902 to 1908; laboratory asst. and asst. physicist and asso. physicist Bureau of Standards, Washington; while at the Bureau of Standards, undertook a foreign trip for purpose of comparing the United States unit of light with the official units of Germany, England and France; was largely instrumental in bringing about national and international agreement on a common unit of light (candle power) for England, France, and the United States; conceived, and to a large extent organized the epochmaking course of lectures on “Illuminating Engineering,” given at Johns Hopkins University, in October and November, 1910: organized physical laboratory National Electric Lamp Ass’n, for study of physical physirotozical and psychological problems in light and illuminations; non-resident member Franklin Institute, Fellow A. A. A. S.; member American Psychological Society, American Electrochemical Society, Illuminating English Society. (pres. 1910 and chairman Research committee), National Electric Light Ass’n; correspondent member, London, Eng., Illuminating Society; Ass’n member American Institute, Electric Engineers, member Electrophysics Com.; member American Gas. Inst. (chairman Photometric commission); member Phi Beta Kappa Fraternity, Cleveland Chamber of Commerce; member Union and Mayfield Country Clubs, Cleveland, and John Hopkins Club, Baltimore, and John Hopkins University Alumni...
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