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Descendants of Peter Crapo

Through the greater part of the last century and up to the present writing, the name of Crapo has stood in and about New Bedford as a synonym for useful citizenship. Here have lived during that period Henry Howland Crapo and William W. Crapo, father and son, of whom a recent biographer says: “Among the many citizens of New Bedford and Dartmouth who have achieved high honor, and whose names are held in respect wherever they are known, are Henry H. Crapo and his son William W. Crapo. Born on a Dartmouth farm, from the sterile soil of which his parents could no more than wrest a livelihood, Henry H. Crapo showed his inborn attributes by closing his life in the highest office which the people of the State of Michigan could confer upon him.” And again, “The strong mental as well as physical resemblance of the son to the father is a striking; illustration of Galton’s doctrine of heredity,” this last having especial reference to William W. Crapo. The Crapo family with its allied connections is of original New England stock. (I) Peter Crapaud (Crapo), the progenitor of the family, was a young French lad cast ashore from a wreck off Cape Cod about 1680. His real name is unknown, but he was nicknamed “Crapaud,” the generic designation of a Frenchman. He was “put out” to Francis Combes, an inn-holder, of North Rochester, Mass. On May 31, 1701, he was married to Penelope White, daughter of Samuel White of Rochester, a son of Resolved White, who came to Plymouth in the “Mayflower” with his father, William White, in...

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as The Waterloo Gazette, which thus became known also as the first paper published in that village. A partial file of these papers is preserved in the rooms of the Historical Society at Waterloo. The oldest copy is Vol. I., No. 6. It is printed upon coarse paper, and is simply plain in execution. Its terms were: Delivered, S2.00 a year; at office, $1.75; club rates, S1.50, and deductions made to post-riders. Herein John Goodwin informs the public that he has added another boat to his ferry, which will enable him to keep one on each side of the Lake Seneca. William Thompson, Esq., gives an order of sale at vendue of a part of the real estate of Thomas W. Roosevelt, of Junius. Lewis Birdsall, then sheriff, offers for sale his tavern-stand near the turnpike gate in Junius. John Watkins gives notice for debtors to settle under penalty of a positive prosecution, and a lover of beer enters his protest against adulterating his favorite beverage with Indian cockle. Postmasters Jesse...

A History of Ovid New York Newspapers

The following information is an attempt to provide details into not only the history of Ovid New York newspapers, but also the sources available online and offline for the genealogist and historian to access the newspapers, or transcriptions therefrom. Newspapers remain a vital source of material for genealogists. They often provide vivid insight into the lives of our ancestors unlike other factual records.

Biography of William S. Hyatt

William S. Hyatt is one of the leading corporation attorneys of Southeastern Kansas, and has handled a large and profitable practice at Parsons for the past thirteen years. He is a native of Kansas and his family have been identified with the state since the early days. The Hyatts were of Scotch descent but came from England to North Carolina in colonial times. One or more of them served with the army of the noted “Swamp Fox” of the revolution, Francis Marion. Mr. Hyatt’s grandfather, Benjamin A. Hyatt, was born in South Carolina in 1820. He grew up in that state, was married in Knoxville, Tennessee, and before the Civil war moved to Shoal Creek in Jasper County, Missouri. Like many southerners he was an ardent admirer of racing horses and enjoyed that sport. In Missouri he raised horses for racing purposes. At the outbreak of the war, being a Union sympathizer, he was compelled to leave Shoal Creek, and while his family refugeed into Kansas he went north to Minnesota and Michigan, taking his horses, and did not get in touch with his family again until they had located at Lawrence. After the war he settled in Labette County, Kansas, and was a farmer and stock raiser, chiefly horses, until his death in Hackberry Township of Labette County in 1889. Politically he was a republican. Benjamin S. Hyatt married Melinda Tipton, who was born in Tennessee and died in Labette County. Her ancestry were identified with the very beginning of the revolutionary war. William Tipton was a commissioned officer in the Patriot army, and in one battle had...

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