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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel. Woven in the narratives of it’s people, however, is the story of Colorado. Initial expeditions by European settlers in this area were for trade with the Natives or as a throughfare to California further west. It wasn’t until one of those wagon trains came a man name of Ralston and he dipped his pan into a creek which would later bare his name and pulled out a troy ounce of gold, worth $5 at the time. A decade later, and other miners began to claim the land in the eastern Colorado area. Pushing ever westward in search of the golden dust they eventually found their way into western Coloado. Some of these miners would eventually settle in the area of their mines and became Colorado’s first residents. Some would have their claim luck out and would stay taking up other responsibilities such as ranching, politics, merchandising, etc. In these people’s lives became the story of Colorado – so while this volume is comprised almost solely of biographies, it is also comprised of the history of early Western Colorado. Click on the page number to view the biography. SurnameGivenMiddleView Bio BurgerFrankMPage 17 TaylorEdwardTPage 18 ZerbeAllenLPage 21 VeatchWilliamLPage 23 HarpHoraceSPage 24 GeorgeAlfredPage 25 BrownHoraceGPage 26 HeatonWilliamVPage 27 ThompsonBenjaminHPage 28 WatsonBenjaminKPage 29 SherwoodBenjaminPage 30 DicksonAmosJPage...

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February.¬†Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again¬†Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his wife, and was at that time on trial for the crime. A writ was issued at once, and the Deputy Marshals were ordered to proceed to “Grimy Snake” Court House, remain until the trial was over, and arrest him, if...

Genealogy of John and Mary Hoskins of Cheshire, England

The Hoskins family came from Cheshire, England, in 1682, and settled in Chester, Pennsylvania, where “The Old Hoskins House” was built in 1688 on Edgemont Avenue, between Front and Second Streets, and was originally used as an Inn. The settling of the city of Chester was entered into with great enterprise and spirit, and those early pioneers established a foundation for all the requirements of living in that age. As early as 1678 they were engaged in laying out roads, building bridges, running ferries, and making possible intercourse between the settlements. Buildings were erected, with a large number to be used for Inns; meeting houses for religious worship, schools, courts where both women and men served on the juries; a House of Correction, where the so-called “Good Old Whipping Post,” Pillory, Tread-mill, Stocks, etc., were included; burial places were made by purchase of plots, including a negro burial ground; business and shipping flourished. We quote from Martin’s History of Chester, Pa.: “Vehicles were not used for traveling in the early days of the Province. The Swedes used boats, as did also the Dutch before them, the creeks and rivers were the natural highways to these people in their own countries, and both nature and necessity made them so in ours. The roads were generally mere paths through the woods, which were free from undergrowth, from the habit the Indians had of firing the woods every fall. The English settlers here traveled, of necessity, on horseback, both men and women. * * * In going to meeting on First-day, the women rode on a pillion, behind their husbands or some...

Biographical Sketch of J.C.C. Hoskins

J.C.C. Hoskins was born in N.H. in 1820; graduated at Dartmouth college in the class of ’41; was engaged in teaching school five years, and afterward followed his profession, that of civil engineering. He was employed by the Cochituate Water works, and afterward by the B. & O.R.R. Co., until the spring of 1857, when he came to this city. In 1863, he was appointed postmaster of Sioux City, and served in that capacity until June 30th, 1878. He was city engineer from 1858 to 1871; has been mayor of the city, and was justice of the peace twelve years; has served on the school board several terms. He was the first engineer for the S.C. & St. P.R.R., and made preliminary surveys, etc. Mr. Hoskins was a director of the Sioux City Savings bank, which was subsequently changed to the Sioux National bank, of which he continues to be a...

Biography of James H. Hoskins

James H. Hoskins, dealer in high grade investment securities, is also well known in the business circles of St. Louis as the president of the Al Fresco Advertising Company. He belongs to that class of enterprising, energetic and farsighted business men upon whose activity the development and prosperity of the city has been built through the past quarter of a century or more. Mr. Hoskins was born in Auburn, New York, December 21, 1859, a son of James H. Hoskins, who was a native of New York and a descendant of John Hoskins, who came from England to the new world in 1632, settling in Connecticut. James H. Hoskins, Sr., was a successful business man who resided in Auburn to the time of his death, which occurred in 1902, when he had reached the age of seventy-two years. In early manhood he had wedded Esther C. Stoner, a daughter of John and Jane (Cuddebach) Stoner. The Cuddebachs are of Holland descent and the family was founded in America by Abram Cuddebach, the great-great-grandfather of James H. Hoskins of this review. Coming to the new world, he settled in the Mohawk valley prior to the Revolutionary war. The ancestry in the Stoner line includes Nicholas Stoner, the great-great-grandfather, who was widely known as a Revolutionary war veteran, trapper and hunter, as was his father, John Stoner. In fact the Stoner family was one of prominence in the state of New York. It was another John Stoner, the grandfather of Air. Hoskins, who settled in Cayuga county, New York, becoming a prosperous farmer there, having come into central New York when...

Hoskins, Jerome – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Jerome “Jerry” Hoskins, 78, of La Grande died Jan. 10 Services are planned 1 p.m. Monday at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in La Grande. Viewing will be on Sunday from 4 until 6 p.m. and again Monday from 9 until 11 a.m. at Daniels Chapel of the Valley. Mr. Hoskins was born Aug. 21, 1928, to Omar K. and Essie C. Hoskins at Havre, Mont. Mr. Hoskins attended grade school at Havre; Mobridge, S.D.; Baker City and Lewiston, Idaho. He attended junior high in Clarkston, Wash., and senior high at Yakima. While in high school Mr. Hoskins earned the Eagle Scout award and was voted outstanding athlete in his senior year, 1946. He attended Washington State College for two years and was affiliated with the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. Mr. Hoskins married the love of his life, Elizabeth June (Bette) Holmes Dec, 31, 1949, at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Yakima. He worked for a railroad, entered into a family ranch operation, later was employed by a Kennewick phone company as a lineman and a foreman, and then moved to Libby, Mont., to rebuilt the phone facilities in preparation of the Libby Day. Mr. Hoskins was promoted to field engineer with GTE and moved to Moscow, Idaho in 1964. Jerry later transferred with GTE to La Grande as a senior outside plant engineer where he retired in 1987. He joined the Episcopal Church in 1949. He was an active member in the Curculio movement and was a member of the site committee at Ascension School. He was also a founding member of the Ascension Barn Crew....

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