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Lindsey Family of Fall River, MA

The Fall River family of Lindseys here considered is a branch of the earlier Bristol, R. I., family. Beyond the marriage at that point of John Lindsey, the first of the name of record there, 1694, nothing definite seems known. It is a tradition in the Bristol family, however, that their ancestor came from Scotland long prior to the American Revolution. Reference is made here to the genealogy and family history of the Fall River branch of the Bristol family, the head of which was the late William Lindsey, who was through a long life a prominent business man and substantial citizen, followed by his son, the late Hon. Crawford Easterbrooks Lindsey, for many years prominently identified with the manufacturing interests of Fall River and of Pawtucket, R. I., a member of both branches of the city government of Fall River and twice its chief executive officer.

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Descendants of John Ames of West Bridgewater MA

The Ames surname is of early English origin, and the family living at Bristol bore the following coat of arms: Argent, on a bend cotised sable, three roses of the field. Motto: Fama Candida rosa dulcior. Crest: A white rose. (I) John Ames was buried at Bruton, Somersetshire, England, in 1560. (II) John Ames (2), son of John, died in 1583; married Margery Crome. Children: John Ames. Launcelot Ames. William Ames. (III) John Ames (3), son of John (2), born in 1560, died in 1629, married Cyprian Browne. Children: William Ames. John Ames, went to New England, settling first at Duxbury, where his name was on a list of those able to bear arms in 1643; removed to Bridgewater, and married Oct. 20, 1645, Elizabeth Heyward; died and left his estate to his brother’s heirs. (IV) William Ames, son of John (3), born in 1605, came to New England and settled in Braintree as early as 1638. He was admitted a freeman May 26, 1647. The Christian name of his wife was Hannah. After his death, which occurred Jan. 1, 1653-54, she married (second) April 6, 1660, John Heiden (Hayden). Children: Hannah Ames, born May 12, 1641; Rebecca Ames, born in October, 1642; Lydia Ames, born in 1645; John Ames, born March 24, 1647; Sarah Ames, born March 1, 1650; Deliverance Ames, born Feb. 6, 1653.” (V) John Ames (4), son of William, born March 24, 1647, married Sarah, daughter of John Willis. He settled in West Bridgewater, Mass., as early as 1672. He served in King Philip’s War. He died about 1726, when his estate was settled. Children:...

Death of Cyrus Kingsbury

Early in the year 1820, an English traveler from Liverpool, named Adam Hodgson, who had heard of the Elliot mission when at home, visited the mission, though he had to turn from his main route of travel the distance of sixty miles. He, at one time on his sixty miles route, employed a Choctaw to conduct him ten or twelve miles on his new way, which he did, then received his pay and left him to finish his journey alone. Of this Choctaw guide Mr. Hodgson, as an example of noble benevolence and faithful trust, states: “After going about a mile, where we became confused in regard to the correct direction and were halting upon two opinions, my guide suddenly and unexpectedly appeared at my side, and pointed in the direction I should go, as he could not talk English. I thanked him and again we parted; but again becoming confused by a diverging path, half a mile distant, as suddenly and unexpectedly, appeared again my guide who had still been, silently and unobserved, watching my steps. Again he set me right, and made signs that my course lay directly toward the sun, and then disappeared;” and by carefully keeping the course as directed by the Choctaw, Mr. Hodgson safely reached the mission, where he was warmly received by the missionaries. Yet the Indian is still called a savage, who “cannot be educated out of his savagery.” God pity such ignorance, and forgive their duplicity in assuming to be enlightened Christians, and yet seek to hand down to the latest posterity a part of God’s created Intelligences the Red...


The first conversion among the full blooded Choctaws was that of an aged man, who lived near Col. David Folsom, chief of the Choctaws, named Tun-a pin a-chuf-fa, (Our one weaver) hitherto as ignorant of the principles of the religion of Jesus Christ as it is possible to conceive. He manifested an interest in the subject of religion about six months before any other of his people in the neighborhood, and soon began to speak publicly in religious meetings, and gave evidence, by his daily walk and conversation, of a happy and glorious change, to the astonishment of his people, who could not comprehend the mystery. The old man, but now a new one, lived the life of a true and devoted Christian the few remaining years of, his life, and then died leaving bright evidence of having died the death of the righteous. When he was received into the church, he was baptized and given the name of one of the missionaries, viz.: William Hooper, by his own request, to whom Mr. Hooper had endeared himself by many acts of kindness conferred upon the aged and appreciative Choctaw. Shortly after he professed religion, he dictated a letter to Col. David Folsom, his nephew, which was written and translated into English by Mr. Loring Williams, of which the following is a copy: “Ai-Ik-Hum-A; Jan. 30, 1828,” (A place of learning.) “Brother; Long time had we been as people in a storm which threatened destruction, until the missionaries came to our land; but now we are permitted to hear the blessed Gospel of truth. You, our brother and chief, found for...

Biography of Frank G. Hooper

Frank G. Hooper has lived in Pottawatomie County since 1885. He had shown exceptional ability in accumulating those things which mean a high degree of material prosperity, and for many years was identified with farming and had one of the largest single estates in Pottawatomie County. He is now living zetized at Belvue and is vice president of the Belvue State Bank. Mr. Hooper was born at Palmyra in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, February 16, 1860. His grandparents were George and Elizabeth Hooper, both natives of England. George Hooper was born in 1799 and in 1845 brought his family to the United States and established a pioneer home in the wilds of Wisconain, then a territory. He developed a farm there and died at Palmyra in 1863. Of his children only one is now living, John, who was born in Cornwall, England, in 1830 and is still living as a farmer in Palmyra, Wisconsin. George Hooper, father of Frank G., was born in Cornwall, England, May 8, 1834, and was eleven years of age when brought to America. He grew up in the wild country around Palmyra, Wisconsin, and turned his early training as a farmer to good account after he started an independent career. His life was largely spent in the Township of Palmyra, but for the last twenty years he lived retired in the village of that name and died there August 28, 1916. He was a republican and honored with various township offices, and was a trustee and steward of the local Methodist Episcopal Church. George Hooper married Jane Strike, who was born February 23, 1834, and...

Biography of William W. Hooper

William W. Hooper has been a resident of Kansas thirty-five years and since 1888 had been a practicing lawyer at Leavenworth. He had long ranked among the leaders of the Leavenworth bar, and while studying law he had the good fortune to be associated with as preceptors such eminent jurists as Hon. Edward Stillings and with the firm of Baker & Hook. His subsequent career in the profession had fully justified the confidence reposed in him by his instructors. Mr. Hooper was born in Fremont, Nebraska, September 12, 1865, and came to Kansas on July 20, 1882. His parents were Richard and Elizabeth (Goodman) Hooper, both now deceased. Richard Hooper was a native of England, came to America when a young man, and spent much of his life as a farmer. As a contractor he at one time had the contract for construction work on the Union Pacific Railway west of Fremont. One of a family of ten children, five sons and five daughters, all of whom are still living, William W. Hooper grew up in Nebraska, attended the Fremont public schools and for one winter was in the normal school there. At the age of seventeen he came to Kansas, and at Leavenworth learned telegraphy in the offices of the Union Pacific Railway. His brother-in-law, Leonard Hohl, was at that time chief train dispatcher at Leavenworth. Mr. Hooper continued active in railway work until June, 1890. He was an expert telegrapher, and was given posts of responsibility at various stations. The latter part of his employment as a railroad man was with the Rock Island road. In 1885...

Hooper, Arthur W. – Obituary

Arthur W. Hooper, 70, Madras, a former longtime Richland resident, died Sunday, November 23, 1980, at the Mountain View Hospital in Madras. His funeral will be at 2 p.m. Friday at the Christian Church in Richland, with the Rev. Chester Stewart officiating. Interment will follow at the Eagle Valley Cemetery in Richland. Mr. Hooper was born in Richland on October 31, 1910, to Gordon and Lura Hoover. He attended school in Richland and had been a member of the Christian Church in Richland since 1940. He farmed in the Richland area from 1937 to 1960. He then worked in construction in Oregon until his retirement in 1975 when he moved to Madras. He married M. Winifred Weir in Baker on June 9, 1937. Survivors include his wife, M. Winifred Hoover of Madras; Six daughters, Lucille Humphrey of Coburg, W. Jean Barkhurst of Puyallup, Wash., Darlene Hampton and Juanita DeBois, both of St. Helens, Catherin Barker and Ruth Lewis, both of Beaverton; a son, Harland of The Dalles, and 16 grandchildren. Baker Democrat Herald – – November 25,...

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