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Staples Family of Taunton, MA

STAPLES (Taunton family). The Staples name is one of long and honorable standing in New England and the country. The family has been a continuous one in the Bay State for two hundred and seventy and more years, and at Taunton, in this Commonwealth, have lived generation after generation of the name down to the present – a worthy race, one representative of the best type of citizenship. Such men in more recent generations as the two Sylvanus Staples, father and son, and the latter’s son Sylvanus Nelson Staples, and the two Ebenezer Staples and Abiel B. Staples – all in line – have played well their part in the affairs of their communities in their day and generation. The Taunton Staples spring from the ancient Weymouth family of the name, from John Staple (the common spelling both in England and America at that period omitting the final “s”), who appears on the records of that town, it is said, in 1636. His wife’s name is given as Rebecca by the late Joseph W. Potter, of Bangor, Maine. John Staple became a freeman of the Colony May 10, 1648. He died July 4, 1683, in Dorchester, leaving according to his will, children John, Jr., of Braintree, Joseph of Taunton, Abraham of Mendon, Rebecca, wife of Samuel Sumner of Dorchester, and Sarah, wife of Increase Sumner, also of Dorchester. John Staple’s son Abraham was a proprietor of Mendon. He married in 1660 Mary, daughter of Robert Randall, of Weymouth, was a weaver by trade, served in King Philip’s war, and was known – probably from service in the militia –...

Descendants of Joseph Borden of Fall River MA

BORDEN (Fall River family – line of Joseph, fourth generation). The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conquerer, and after the battle of Hastings  – in A. D. 1066 – was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where they resided being named Borden. One John Borden, of a later generation, moved to Wales early in the seventeenth century, where his sons Richard and John were married. These sons returned to Borden, in England, and in May, 1635, embarked for America. (I) Richard Borden is found a settler in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1638, in which year he was admitted an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck, and in that same year was allotted five acres of land. He figured in the surveying and platting of the lands thereabout in 1639, and in the year following was one of those appointed to lay out the lands in Porstmouth, R. I. He was assistant in 1653 and 1654; general treasurer in 1654-55; commissioner in 1654-55-56-57; and deputy in 1667 and 1670. He bought land in Providence in 1661, and not far from 1667 became one of the original purchasers of land in New Jersey from the Indians. He...

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Hamlin Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Aagaard, Geo. Wf. Marie. P. O. Exira, R. 5. O. 160 ac., sec. 20. (2.5.) Aagaard, Hans.Wf.Inger; ch.Sena, Bertha, Emmert. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 78 ac.. sec. 10; O.37 ac.,  sec. 15. (27.) Albertson, John. Wf. Esther. P. O. Exira. R. 120 ac., sec. 35. (5.) Owner, Jorgen Hansen. Andersen, A. H. Wf. Christena; A. Egidia and Alfred. P. O. Audubon, it. 4. O. 80 ac., sec. 18;O. 120 ac., sec. 17. (23.) Andersen, Andy. Wf. Alice. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 272.48 ac., sec. 3. (15.) Owner, E. S. Gorder. Andersen, Chas. Wf. Charlotta; ch.Thamer, David, Margaret, Walter, Herman, Esther, Harold, Iner, Agnes and Augusta. P. O. Exira, R. 5. R. 160 ac., sec. 16. (3.) Owner, E. Dryden. Andersen, Chris N. Wf. Annie; ch. Andrew F. P. O. Exira, R. 5. O. 160 ac., sec. 19. (32.) Andersen, Hans, Wf. Hannah; A. Egdia, Ben, Theodore, llartha, Hilda and Harold. P. O. Exira, R. 5. O. 160 ac., sec. 26; O. 30 ac., sec. 23. (34.) Atkinson, Sam. Sister Mary. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1.O. 13 ac., sec. 10.(45.) Burr, H. W. Wf. Glee; ch.Emmert A. and Mary L. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 40 ac., sec. 11; O. 80 ac., sec. 2. (36.) Campbell, F. E. Wf. Mabel; ch. Wm. F. and Louis G. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 240 ac., sec. 13. (20.) Carroll, John D. Wf. Lola; ch. Loraine. P. O. Hamlin, Box 133. R. 160 ac., sec. 11. (2.) Owner....

Claybank Cemetery Ozark Alabama

Margaret Claybank Cemetery is located about two miles from Ozark, Alabama on Ozark – Daleville Highway. This cemetery enumeration was performed in 1948 by Eustus Hayes and as such will provide details on headstones which may no longer be present in the cemetery. Lizzie E. Dowling June 25, 1853 – Oct 31, 1938. Wife of N. B. Dowling. N. B. Dowling Aug 15, 1853 – Mar 28, 1938. Hus of Lizzie E. Dowling. Leila Belle Dowling May 26, 1876 – Jan 14, 1933. Dau of S. L. & Sarah Jane Dowling. Samuel L. Dowling Nov 3, 1841 – Jan 15, 1919. Sarah Jane Windham Feb 22, 1839 – June 15, 1925. Wife of Samuel L. Dowling. Rev. John Dowling July 20, 1818 – Feb 28, 1900. Son of Rev. Dempsey Dowling. Charlotte Dowling Oct 20, 1888 -. Wife of Rev. John Dowling Sr. Erin Elizabeth Dowling Feb 10, 1902 – Sep 11, 1902 Inf. Dau of R.Y. & Melissa Dowling. Pauline Dowling Feb 13, 1897 June 24, 1899 Inf. Dau of RY & Melissa Dowling. Alonzo G. Dowling Dec 26, 1888 June 16, 1922. F. Melissa Prigden July 1, 1866 Apr 18, 1943. Wife of R.Y. Dowling. Robert Y. Dowling June 14, 1865 Aug 30, 1924. J. B. Dowling July 16, 1903 Oct 20, 1928. Sarah E. Thomas Feb 23, 1839 – Sep 10, 1917. Wife of F.M. Prigden. F.M. Prigden Apr 10, 1838 – Feb 21, 1908. Jefferson Dowling May 6, 1848 – Mar 12, 1887. Margaret Dowling Oct 7, 1850 – Aug 16, 1887. Wife of Jefferson Dowling. Nellie Parker July 16, 1855 – Nov 2, 1887....

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. C. Hood

The Story of Mrs. C. Hood: Once upon a time during the Civil War my grandmother was alone with just one old faithful servant. The Union troops had just about taken everything she had, except three prize saddle horses and one coal black mare which she rode all the time. She was very fond of the mare and valued it very much. One night my grandmother heard a noise, and called old Joe to go to the barn and see what was the matter. As he was nearing the barn someone yelled “Halt”; and Joe being a black man and a servant, stopped just where he was. My grandmother, who had also heard the command, paid no attention whatsoever; she went straight through the dozen or more Union soldiers who were stealing her stock to the one who appeared to be the leader. He was holding her mare; she jerked the briddle from his hand, led her mare back to the kitchen door, where she held her the remainder of the night. A Story: When my mother was a girl she was staying with some kinfolks for one month. These people owned several slaves and among them was one old man-servant who was very old and had served out his usefulness. It was war time and food was scarce even for the white folks. The younger and stronger slaves got most of the food, and old Tom was always hungry. My mother finding this out, and feeling sorry for him would slip him bread and other food through a hole in the kitchen floor. A short time after this,...

Will of Thomas Hood – 1671

THOMAS HOOD, New York. “I, Thomas Hood, lately a souldier in ye Garrison of Fort James, being since my arrivall taken sick,” makes loving friends, Richard Patum and John Bugby, executors, and leaves them “my share of Log wood in the Ketch, ‘Society,’ now riding, at anchor in the road of New York, of which Thomas Edwards is master.” “I give ye summe of 300 guilders, wampum, or ye value thereof, to be spent among my fellow-souldiers in the Garrison of Fort James.” Legacies to friends John Clarke and Richard Charlton. Dated October 7, 1671. Witnesses, Francis Yates, John Laureson. Above executors were confirmed October 14, 1671. States that he had “formerly been a soldier, hut had lately come from the West Indies, in the ketch, ‘Society,’ and had a share of log wood, a chest of silks, and some other things.” LIBER 1-2, page...

Biography of John C. Hood

John C. Hood, clerk of the circuit court of Racine County and a native of the city of Racine, was born October 18, 1869. a son of Samuel and Alice A. (Coy) Hood. The father, whose birth occurred in Oxford, Pennsylvania, was a son of Thomas Hood, also born in the Keystone state. In the year 1838 Thomas Hood brought his family to Racine and entered a government claim of one hundred and sixty acres near the city. With the pioneer development of the district he was closely associated and he became a prominent and influential resident of his Township. His son, Samuel Hood, embarked in the lumber business in Racine and was for many years proprietor of one of the leading lumber yards of the city, conducting a growing and profitable business. He was interested in all projects for the welfare and benefit of the community and at one time served on the school board. He married Alice A. Coy, a native of England and a daughter of John Coy, who came with his family to the United States in 1832, settling at Utica, New York. The year 1848 witnessed his arrival in Racine, after which he engaged in business here as a contractor. Both Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hood were members of the Baptist church and in politics he was an earnest republican. He died September 21, 1905, after a residence of sixty-seven years in this County, and his widow departed this life May 15, 1912. They were both representatives of old families of the County and from early pioneer times down to the present representatives of...

Biography of William C. Hood

William C. Hood, who since 1898 has been manager for the American Seating Company at Racine, was born in this city April 21, 1860, a son of Samuel and Alice (Coy) Hood. The father was a son of Thomas Hood, who came from New York to Racine in 1836, when the work of development and improvement had scarcely been begun in this section of the state. He secured government land and became one of the pioneer settlers of the district. Hood’s creek was named in his honor. His son, Samuel Hood, engaged in farming to the age of twenty-one years and afterward entered the employ of J. I. Case, with whom he remained for several years. Subsequently he established a lumberyard which he conducted for many years, carrying on a growing and profitable business. Later he retired and spent his last days in the enjoyment of well earned rest, passing away after reaching the eightieth milestone on life’s journey. His wife is also deceased. Mr. Hood had served as a member of the school board and was interested in all that pertained to public progress and improvement. At the time of the Civil war he became a member of the commissary department and in politics he was always a republican, standing loyally by the party which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of civil strife. William C. Hood acquired a public school education in Racine and made his initial step in the business world as a clerk, spending a year and a half in different stores. In 1880 he entered the employ of the Racine...
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