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Slave Narrative of Scott Mitchell

Interviewer: Margaret Bishop Person Interviewed: Scott Mitchell Location: Breathitt County, Kentucky As told by Scott Mitchell, a former slave: Scott Mitchell, claims his age as somewhere in the 70’s but his wool is white on the top of his head. Negroes don’t whiten near as quickly as white people, evidently he is nearly 90, or there-a-bouts. “Yes’m I ‘members the Civil Wah, ’cause I wuz a-livin’ in Christian County whah I wuz bohn, right wif my masteh and mistress. Captin Hester and his wife. I wuz raised on a fahm right wif the, then I lef there. “Yes, Cap’n Hester traded my mother an my sister, ‘Twuz in 1861, he sent em tuh Mississippi. When they wuz ‘way from him ’bout two years he bot em back. Yes, he wuz good tuh us. I wuz my mistess’ boy. I looked afteh her, en she made all uv my cloes, en she knit my socks, ’cause I wuz her niggah. “Yes, I wuz twenty yeahs old when I wuz married. I members when I wuz a boy when they had thet Civil Wah. I members theah wuz a brick office wheah they took en hung colohed folks. Yes, the blood wuz a-streamin’ down. Sumtimes theah hung them by theah feet, sometimes they hung them by theah thumbs. “I cum tu Kentucky coal mines when I wuz ’bout twenty years old. I worked for Mistah Jenkins. I worked right here et the Davis, the R.T. Davis coal mine, en at the Bailey mine; that was a-fore Mistah Bailey died. “When I worked for Mistah Davis he provided a house in the...

Hester, Ray C. – Obituary

Troy, Wallowa County, Oregon Ray C. Hester, who was engaged in stock raising at Troy a few years beginning in 1918, died at Pendleton Monday after a short illness. He was born at Emmetsburg, Iowa, 54 years ago, and the family moved to Lewiston, Idaho in 1904. After leaving Troy he moved to Pendleton, and at the time of his death he was assistant cashier of the branch of the First National Bank of Portland. Surviving are the widow, a son and a daughter and a brother and a sister. Source: Enterprise Record Chieftain, Enterprise, Oregon, February 29, 1940, page 2 Contributed by: Sue...

Biography of Captain George B. Hester

The name of Captain George B. Hester figures prominently on the pages of Oklahoma’s history. About the middle of the nineteenth century he became a resident of the Indian Territory and from that time forward left the impress of his individuality and ability upon the history of this great region which is now known as the state of Oklahoma. He was born in North Carolina on the 26th of March, 1832, and was a young man of but twenty-three years when in 1855 he came to the Indian Territory, settling at Tishomingo, in what is now Johnson County, then the capital of the Chickasaw Nation. There he established a store and his business as a merchant brought him into close relations with the Indians and with political and social affairs. His influence as a man of honor and fair dealing left a deep impress on the life of the community. The Indian people soon recognized his entire trust-worthiness and his advice and counsel were frequently sought. He possessed an unprejudiced mind of a judicial caste and his opinions were fair, impartial and ever given for the benefit of those who sought his aid. He worked untiringly for the peace and progress of the community in which he lived and thus aided in smoothing the way for the advent of the white settlers and for the new and better order of things existing in the state. On June 7, 1859, Captain Hester was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Fulton, who was then a missionary in the Indian country. She is a daughter of the Rev. D. T. Fulton, a...

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